How do you hire the best talent in a competitive marketplace?

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Kapwing, a scrappy startup out of SF wrote this excellent piece how they hired 10 employees in the very tight bay area market. It caught my attention because the demand for great people has never been higher.

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Here are the ways they found great people…

1. Events

Meetups are always an excellent way to find great people. Tech networking, can be one part selling your ideas, projecting your prowess or career building for your own people. And meanwhile career forward, self-actuated employees are scoping you out too.

Check out: What did Matt Ranney discover scaling Uber to 1000 microservices?

2. Friend referrals

Connecting through your own people is always a good way to find talent. These referrals are also great because you already have a handle on the hires real-world experience and personality. Good for everybody.

Also: What happened when I offered advice outside my pay grade?

3. Press

As your startup grows, you get some press in TechCrunch or ReCode. This generates some household recognition in the tech community, or posts on HackerNews. From there you get inbound requests because smart people are on the prowl for a great company. Done & done!

Related: Can humility help you in your career?

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What do senior engineers do differently?

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I recently stumbled up on this piece at Pivotal, The art of interrupting software engineers. It caught my attention because i like to read from a different vantage from my own.

What is it like to interrupt us?

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What I really got from the article though, was how different types of engineers will think about problems differently.

1. Under the hood

For junior engineers who are still a bit green, and new to working in industry, they’re downward facing. Focusing solely under the hood, they may not see how their work contributes to a product, or how it fits into the overall picture for the business.

“When asked about their progress on a story, they would make an effort to ensure I understood what was happening under the hood and what tradeoffs they were facing using a vocabulary I was familiar with. ”

For her it was technical competence that stood out – or at least not the only thing – but rather how they were strategizing, and communicating their problems, challenges, and progress.

Read: What happened when I offered advice outside my pay grade?

2. Communicate discoveries

A more intermediate engineer, would sometimes anticipate & communicate better.

“In some cases, those engineers would come to me before I even had a chance to enter the paranoid zone and give me a simple explanation of how the team had learned new information since they first estimated the complexity of a story. ”

She is also speaking of situational awareness. So not working in a vacuum, communicating & incorporating that new information as it becomes available.

Read: What did Matt Ranney discover scaling Uber to 1000 microservices?

3. Anticipate in advance

Senior engineers, she says would really stay ahead of the curve. They were even anticipating what might be a roadblock for her product delivery.


“Some of the very best practitioners would ask me in advance how urgently we should deliver a particular user story and what we were ready to give up in order to ship faster.”

Weighing tradeoffs, and prioritizing is a huge factor in velocity. If you can tame that beast, you’ll go very far indeed!

Related: Can humility help you in your career?

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How I use 5 daily habits to help me stay on track

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1. Keep a tight todo list

I shoot for five tasks on my todo list. Be sure they are small, 15-30 minute tasks because things have a way of ballooning. If what you’re doing takes longer, break it down into smaller pieces. This keeps you moving, and always making progress.

You might be tempted to have more items. But chances are you’ll spend an hour on emails and time on phone calls, and other distractions. And there will be preemptive tasks that suddenly require your attention. So keeping this list small, allows you to hit close to 100% success.

Sure there will be days when you’re *more* productive. It doesn’t hurt to pull some items off the long term list. 🙂

Related: When you have to take the fall

2. Zero inbox

I’m relentless about this. Terse replies, stay focused, and remember the reward you’ll give yourself when you finish your day.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Take a break every hour or two

Smokers have an easy time with this. And perhaps coffee drinkers. If you’re anyone else, you may get into the habit of staying in your chair. Don’t. Regular breaks promote creative thinking, and physically moving helps get the mind in motion too.

Sometimes when I work in a coffeeshop I don’t bring my charger. That way I’m forced to take a break when the battery runs low.

Related: Why i ask for a deposit

4. Reward yourself

Pat yourself on the back when you complete all your tasks. If it’s 4pm, so be it. Jet a bit early. You know there will be other days when you’re working until 8pm too. Promise yourself something when you finish. A treat, or a stroll through the park, or an extra ten minutes to walk your dog, or a frosty IPA. Whatever it is, rewards help remind is we’ve done well.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

5. Always be networking

If you’re in a FT role, you may do most of your socializing with coworkers. That’s fine, but be sure to go to some regular meetups too. And followup with people. Maybe even give a few talks now and then. Networking is the most surefire way to build your career and always be growing. And it’s a little bit each day that it takes to build lasting momentum.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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How to find freelance work

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I’ve decided to take the plunge, and begin a career as a freelancer. What do you think of services like UpWork? Can I build a business around that?

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There are lots of services that promise the same thing. Headshops too are businesses built around reselling you to customers.

1. Whose relationship?

On those platforms you are a commodity. And further you don’t control the relationship. Upwork becomes your customer.

This is a crucial point. You can’t negotiate additional services or fees, or build on the relationship. Because your customer is UpWork. They control the business they bring to you.

Just remember, your boss/client/customer is the one who writes you a check.

Related: When you have to take the fall

2. Learn sales

If you think you’re not so great at sales, join the club. It’s a real talent, and one everybody is not born with.

But if you want to work for yourself, it’s absolutely crucial. So get practicing!

Related: When clients don’t pay

3. Go to events

The ways i have found, network, meetups, blog weekly and have a newsletter that you send out monthly. Add everyone you ever meet to your newsletter. Write interesting things & appeal to a broad audience. Some receiving your newsletter will not read it but they will see your name pop up in their inbox once a month.

Related: Why i ask for a deposit

4. Expand

As you network, ask others for recommendations. Events, private email lists, single day conferences, forums etc.

Related: Can progress reports help consulting engagementss succeed?

5. Craft an origin story

And don’t forget to tell your story. And tell it well. Craft a memorable origin narrative. Practice & and add or remove things that resonate with people you meet. Even ask people, what do you think about my presentation? Any suggestions? Is it confusing, enticing, exciting?

Related: Why do people leave consulting?

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What does your dream job look like?

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I see this question a lot because I’m often on the lookout for new opportunities. So I speak with a lot of recruiters, hiring managers and CTOs. It’s an interesting question.

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When I think about it, there are a few ways to break it down. Here’s what differentiates firms for me.

1. What pace are you looking for?

Is the work-life balance the most important thing for you? That is do you want to leave at 5pm and not be oncall nights and weekends?

Alternatively are you after the fast-paced, always on, blistering hockey stick growth startup phase? That’s also exciting, although it may make work-life balance tougher.

Not to say the world is divided up into only two types, I do think this is an interesting way to divide up the world.

Related: Why I don’t work with recruiters

2. What engineering culture do you like?

Do you prefer an engineering organization, that is doing things cleanly, concisely, with truly best practices and high code quality, though perhaps with greater process control?

Or would you prefer more cowboy style, with less process and able to move quickly and get things out the door?

Related: How to hack job search?

3. What type of teams do you enjoy?

In some organizations that are smaller, you get a chance to wear a lot of hats. You aren’t so specialized because there are fewer total team members. For example there may not be one person devoted to the database work, and one developer takes on that responsibility. While there is not devops team, another developer automates infrastructure.

Alternatively do you prefer more clearly defined job roles? That may be a larger org that has many more engineers. In that way you can own your own tiny slice, and focus just on that skillset or tool.

Both are valid of course, but they may be different types of orgs or companies at different stages in their development.

Related: Questions to ask for a devops interview

4. What’s your overall motivation?

This is an interesting question. For me personally, I prefer to have the biggest business impact. If I can come into an organization and raise the bar, even if the bar wasn’t high to begin with, that is very satisfying. If I don’t get to use the coolest wiz-bang technologies that’s ok with me.

Alternatively there are some organizations that are facing much more challenging problems. These tend to be very hard technical problems, where the bar is already quite high. In those you may be surrounded by very talented engineers indeed, and the baseline for entry is already quite high.

Again both are valid, just a matter of what type of environment you thrive in.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck?

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6 Devops interview questions

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Devops is in serious demand these days. At every meetup or tech event I attend, I hear a recruiter or startup founder talking about it. It seems everyone wants to see benefits of talented operations brought to their business.

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That said the skill set is very broad, which explains why there aren’t more devs picking up the batton.





I thought it would be helpful to put together a list of interview questions. There are certainly others, but here’s what I came up with.

1. Explain the gitflow release process

As a devops engineer you should have a good foundation about software delivery. With that you should understand git very well, especially the standard workflow.

Although there are other methods to manage code, one solid & proven method is gitflow. In a nutshell you have two main branches, development & master. Developers checkout a new branch to add a feature, and push it back to development branch. Your stage server can be built automatically off of this branch.

Periodically you will want to release a new version of the software. For this you merge development to master. UAT is then built automatically off of the master branch. When acceptance testing is done, you deploy off of master to production. Hence the saying always ship trunk.

Bonus points if you know that hotfixes are done directly off the master branch & pushed straight out that way.

Related: 8 questions to ask an AWS expert

2. How do you provision resources?

There are a lot of tools in the devops toolbox these days. One that is great at provisioning resources is Terraform. With it you can specify in declarative code everything your application will need to run in the cloud. From IAM users, roles & groups, dynamodb tables, rds instances, VPCs & subnets, security groups, ec2 instances, ebs volumes, S3 buckets and more.

You may also choose to use CloudFormation of course, but in my experience terraform is more polished. What’s more it supports multi-cloud. Want to deploy in GCP or Azure, just port your templates & you’re up and running in no time.

It takes some time to get used to the new workflow of building things in terraform rather than at the AWS cli or dashboard, but once you do you’ll see benefits right away. You gain all the advantages of versioning code we see with other software development. Want to rollback, no problem. Want to do unit tests against your infrastructure? You can do that too!

Related: Does a 4-letter-word divide dev & ops?

3. How do you configure servers?

The four big choices for configuration management these days are Ansible, Salt, Chef & Puppet. For my money Ansible has some nice advantages.

First it doesn’t require an agent. As long as you have SSH access to your box, you can manage it with Ansible. Plus your existing shell scripts are pretty easy to port to playbooks. Ansible also does not require a server to house your playbooks. Simply keep them in your git repository, and checkout to your desktop. Then run ansible-playbook on the yaml file. Voila, server configuration!

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

4. What does testing enable?

Unit testing & integration testing are super import parts of continuous integration. As you automate your tests, you formalize how your site & code should behave. That way when you automate the deployment, you can also automate the test process. Let the software do the drudgework of making sure a new feature hasn’t broken anything on the site.

As you automate more tests, you accelerate the software development process, because you’re doing less and less manually. That means being more agile, and makes the business more nimble.

Related: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

5. Explain a use case for Docker

Docker a low overhead way to run virtual machines on your local box or in the cloud. Although they’re not strictly distinct machines, nor do they need to boot an OS, they give you many of those benefits.

Docker can encapsulate legacy applications, allowing you to deploy them to servers that might not otherwise be easy to setup with older packages & software versions.

Docker can be used to build test boxes, during your deploy process to facilitate continuous integration testing.

Docker can be used to provision boxes in the cloud, and with swarm you can orchestrate clusters too. Pretty cool!

Related: Will Microservices just die already?

6. How is communicating relevant to Devops

Since devops brings a new process of continuous delivery to the organization, it involves some risk. Actually doing things the old way involves more risk in the long term, because things can and will break. With automation, you can recovery quicker from failure.

But this new world, requires a leap of faith. It’s not right for every organization or in every case, and you’ll likely strike a balance from what the devops holy book says, and what your org can tolerate. However inevitably communication becomes very important as you advocate for new ways of doing things.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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Is there a serious skills shortage around devops space?

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As devops adoption picks up pace, the signs are everywhere. Infrastructure as code once a backwater concept, and a hoped for ideal, has become an essential to many startups.

Why might that be?

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My theory is that devops enables the business in a lot of profound ways. Sure it means one sysadmin can do much more, manage a fleet of servers, and support a large user base. But it goes much deeper than that.





Being able to standup your entire dev, qa, or production environment at the click of the button transforms software delivery dramatically. It means it can happen more often, more easily, and with less risk to the business. It means you can do things like blue/green deployments, rolling out featues without any risk to the production environment running in parallel.

What kind of chops does it take?

Strong generalist skills

For starters you’ll need a pragmatist mindset. Not fanatical about one technology, but open to the many choices available. And as a generalist, you start with a familiarity with a broad spectrum of skills, from coding, troubleshooting & debugging, to performance tuning & integration testing.

Stir into the mix good operating system fundamentals, top to bottom knowledge of Unix & Linux, networking, configuration and more. Maybe you’ve built kernels, compiled packages by hand, or better yet contributed to a few open source projects yourself.

You’ll be comfortable with databases, frontend frameworks, backend technologies & APIs. But that’s not all. You’ll need a broad understanding of cloud technologies, from GCP to AWS. S3, EC2, VPCs, EBS, webservers, caching servers, load balancing, Route53 DNS, serverless lambda. Add to all of that programmable infrastructure through CloudFormation or Terraform.

Related: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

Competent programmer

Although as a devop you probably won’t be doing frontend dev, you’ll need some cursory understanding of those. You should be competent at Python and perhaps Nodejs. Maybe Ruby & bash scripts. You’ll need to understand JSON & Yaml, CloudFormation & Terraform if you want to deliver IAC.

Related: Does a 4-letter-word divide dev & ops?

Strong sysadmin with ops mindset

These are fundamental. But what does that mean? Ops mindset is born out of necessity. Having seen failures & outages, you prioritize around uptime. A simpler stack means fewer moving parts & less to manage. Do as Martin Weiner would suggest & use boring tech.

But you’ll also need to reason about all these components. That’ll come from dozens of debug & troubleshooting sessions you’ll do through years of practice.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

Understand build systems & deployment models

Build systems like CircleCI, Jenkins or Gitlab offer a way to automate code delivery. And as their use becomes more widespread knowing them becomes de rigueur. But it doesn’t end there.

With deployments you’ll have a lot to choose from. At the very simplest a single target deploy, to all-at-once, minimum in service and rolling upgrades. But if you have completely automated your dev, qa & prod infra buildout, you can dive into blue/green deployments, where you make a completely knew infra for each deploy, test, then tear down the old.

Related: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

Personality to communicate across organization

I think if you’ve made it this far you will agree that the technical know-how is a broad spectrum of modern computing expertise. But you’ll also need excellent people skills to put all this into practice.

That’s because devops is also about organizational transformation. Yes devs & ops have to get up to speed on the tech, but the organization has to get on board too. Many entrenched orgs pay lip service to devops, but still do a lot of things manually. This is out of fear as much as it stands as technical debt.

But getting past that requires evangelizing, and advocating. For that a leader in the devops department will need superb people skills. They’ll communicate concepts broadly across the organization to win hearts and minds.

Related: Will Microservices just die already?

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How is automation impacting the dba role?

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I was at a dinner party recently, and talking with some colleagues. I had worked with them years back on Oracle systems.

One colleague Maria said she really enjoyed my newsletter.

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She went on to say how much has changed in the last decade. We talked about how the database administrator, as a career role, wasn’t really being hired for much these days. Things had changed. Evolved a lot.

How do you keep up with all the new technology, she asked?

I went on to talk about Amazon RDS, EC2, lambda & serverless as really exciting stuff. And lets not forget terraform (I wrote a howto on terraform), ansible, jenkins and all the other deployment automation technologies.





We talked about Redshift too. It seems to be everywhere these days and starting to supplant hadoop as the warehouse of choice for analytics.

It was a great conversation, and afterward I decided to summarize my thoughts. Here’s how I think automation and the cloud are impacting the dba role.

My career pivots

Over the years I’ve poured all those computer science algorithms, coding & hardware skills into a lot of areas. Tools & popular language change. Frameworks change. But solid deductive reasoning remains priceless.

o C++ Developer

Fresh out of college I was doing Object Oriented Programming on the Macintosh with Codewarrior & powerplant. C++ development is no joke, and daily coding builds strength in a lot of areas. Turns out he application was a database application, so I was already getting my feet wet with databases.

o Jack of all trades developer & Unix admin

One type of job role that I highly recommend early on is as a generalist. At a small startup with less than ten employees, you become the primary technology solutions architect. So any projects that come along you get your hands dirty with. I was able to land one of these roles. I got to work on Windows one day, Mac programming another & Unix administration & Oracle yet another day.

o Oracle DBA

The third pivot was to work primarily on Oracle. I attended Oracle conferences & my peers were Oracle admins. Interestingly, many of the Oracle “experts” came from more of a business background, not computer science. So to have a more technical foundation really made you stand out.

For the startups I worked with, I was a performance guru, scalability expert. Managers may know they have Oracle in the mix, but ultimately the end goal is to speed up the website & make the business run. The technical nuts & bolts of Oracle DBA were almost incidental.

o MySQL & Postgres

As Linux matured, so did a lot of other open source projects. In particular the two big Open Source databases, MySQL & Postgres became viable.

Suddenly startups were willing to put their businesses on these technologies. They could avoid huge fees in Oracle licenses. Still there were not a lot of career database experts around, so this proved a good niche to focus on.

o RDS & Redshift on Amazon Cloud

Fast forward a few more years and it’s my fifth career pivot. Amazon Web Services bursts on the scene. Every startup is deploying their applications in the cloud. And they’re using Amazon RDS their managed database service to do it. That meant the traditional DBA role was less crucial. Sure the business still needed data expertise, but usually not as a dedicated role.

Time to shift gears and pour all of that Linux & server building experience into cloud deployments & migrating to the cloud.

o Devops, data, scalability & performance

Now of course the big sysadmin type role is usually called an SRE or Devops role. SRE being site reliability engineer. New name but many of the same responsibilities.

Now though infrastructure as code becomes front & center. Tools like CloudFormation & Terraform, plus Ansible, Chef & Jenkins are all quite mature, and being used everywhere.

Checkout your infrastructure code from git, and run terraform apply. And minutes later you have rebuilt your entire stack from bare metal to fully functioning & autoscaling application. Cool!

Related: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

How I’ve steered DBA skills

There’s no doubt that data expertise & management skills are still huge. But the career role of database administrator has evolved quite a bit.

Related: 5 surprising features of Amazon Lambda serverless computing

Pros of automation & managing databases

For DBAs who are looking at the cloud from the old way of doing things, there’s a lot to love about it.

Automation brings repeatability to work & jobs. This is great. It raises the bar & makes us more professional, reducing manual processes & mistakes.

Infrastructure as code is self documenting. It means we have a better idea of day-to-day processes, and can more easily handoff to new folks as we change roles or companies.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

Cons of automation & databases

However these days cloud, automation & microservices have brought a lot of madness too! Don’t believe me check out this piece on microservice madness.

With microservices you have more databases across the enterprise, on more platforms. How do you restore all at the same time? How do you do point-in-time recovery? What if your managed service goes down?

Migration scripts have become popular to make DDL changes in the database. Going forward (adding columns or tables) is great. But should we be letting our deployment automation roll *BACK* DDL changes? Remember that deletes data right? 🙂

What about database drop & rebuild? Or throwing databases in a docker container? No bueno. But we’re seeing this more and more. New performance problems are cropping up because of that.

What about when your database upgrades automatically? Remember when you use a managed service, it is build for 1000 users, not one. So if your use case is different you may struggle.

In my experience upgrading RDS was a nightmare. Database as a service upgrades lack visibility. You don’t have OS or SSH access so you can’t keep track of things. You just simply wait.

No longer do we have “zero downtime”. With amazon RDS you have guarenteed downtime upgrades. No seriously.

As the field of databases fragments, we are wearing many more hats. If you like this challenge & enjoy being a generalist, you may feel at home here. But it is a long way from one platform one skill set career path.

Also fragmented db platforms means more complex recovery. I can’t stress this enough. It would become practically impossible to restore all microservices, all their underlying databases & all systems to one single point in time, if you need to.

Related: Is upgrading Amazon RDS like a sh*t storm that will not end?

DBAs, it’s time to step up and pivot

As the DBA role evolves, it also brings great opportunity. For those with solid database & data skills are sorely in need at startups and many fortune 500 organizations.

What I’m seeing is that organizations have lost much of the discipline they had as separate dba or operations departments. Schemaless databases have proliferated, and performance has suffered.

All these are more complex now, but strong DBA, performance & troubleshooting skills are needed now more than ever.

Related: The art of resistance in tech consulting

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How to interview an amazon database expert

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Amazon releases a new database offering every other day. It sure isn’t easy to keep up.

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Let’s say you’re hiring a devops & you want to suss out their database knowledge? Or you’re hiring a professional services firm or freelance consultant. Whatever the case you’ll need to sift through for the best people. Here’s how.

Also: How to interview an AWS expert

What database does Amazon support for caching?

Caching is a popular way to speed up access to your backend database. Put Amazon’s elasticache behind your webserver, and you can reduce load on your database by 90%. Nice!

The two types that amazon supports are Memcache & Redis. Memcache is historically more popular. These days Redis seems a clear winner. It’s faster, and can maintain your cached data between restarts. That will save you I promise!

Also: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

How can I store big data in AWS?

Amazon’s data warehouse offering is called Redshift. I wrote Why is everyone suddenly talking about Redshift?. Why indeed!

When you’re doing large reports for your business intelligence team, you don’t want to bog down your backend relational database. Redshift is purpose built for this use case.

I’ve see a report that took over 8 hours in MySQL return in under 60 seconds in Redshift!

A new offering is Amazon Spectrum. This tech is super cool. Load up all your data into S3, in standard CSV format. Then without even loading it into Redshift, you can query the S3 data directly. This is super useful. Firstly because S3 is 1/10th the price. But also because it allows you to stage your data before loading into Redshift itself. Goodbye Google Big Query! I talked about spectrum here.

Related: Which engineering roles are in greatest demand?

What relational database options are there on Amazon?

Amazon supports a number of options through it’s Relational Database Service or RDS. This is managed databases, which means less work on your DBAs shoulders. It also may make upgrades slower and harder with more downtime, but you get what you pay for.

There are a lot of platforms available. As you might guess MySQL & Postgres are there. Great! Even better you can use MariaDB if that’s your favorite. You can also go with Aurora which is Amazon’s own home-brew drop in replacement for MySQL that promises greater durability and some speedups.

If you’re a glutton for punishment, you can even get Oracle & SQL Server working on RDS. Very nice!

Read: Can on-demand consulting save startups time & money?

Does AWS have a NoSQL database solution?

If NoSQL is to your taste, Amazon has DynamoDB. According to . I haven’t seen a lot of large production applications using it, but what he describes makes a lot of sense. The way Amazon scales nodes & data I/O is bound to run into real performance problems.

That said it can be a great way to get you up and running quickly.

Read: Can on-demand consulting save startups time & money?

How do I do ETL & migrate data to AWS?

Let’s be honest, Amazon wants to make this really easy. The quicker & simpler it is to get your data there, that more you’ll buy!

Amazon’s Database Migration Service or DMS allows you to configure your old database as a data source, then choose a Amazon db solution as destination, then just turn on the spigot and pump your data in!

ETL is extract transform and load, data warehouse terminology for slicing and dicing data before you load it into your warehouse. Many of todays warehouses are being built with the data lake model, because databases like Redshift have gotten so damn fast. That model means you stage all your source data as-is in your warehouse, then build views & summary tables as needed to speed up queries & reports. Even better you might look a tool like xplenty.

Amazon’s new offering is called Glue. Five ways to get data into Amazon Redshift. This solution is purpose build for creating a powerful data pipeline, complete with python code to do transformations.

Read: Is data your dirty little secret?

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Top questions to ask a devops expert when hiring or preparing for job & interview

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Strip by Randall Munroe; xkcd.com

Whether your a hiring manager, head of HR or recruiter, you are probably looking for a devops expert. These days good ones are not easy to find. The spectrum of tools & technologies is broad. To manage today’s cloud you need a generalist.

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If you’re a devops expert and looking for a job, these are also some essential questions you should have in your pocket. Be able to elaborate on these high level concepts as they’re crucial in todays agile startups.

Check out: 8 questions to ask an aws ec2 expert

Also new: Top questions to ask on a devops expert interview

And: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

1. How do you automate deployments?

A. Get your code in version control (git)

Believe it or not there are small 1 person teams that haven’t done this. But even with those, there’s real benefit. Get on it!

B. Evolve to one script push-button deploy (script)

If deploying new code involves a lot of manual steps, move file here, set config there, set variable, setup S3 bucket, etc, then start scripting. That midnight deploy process should be one master script which includes all the logic.

It’s a process to get there, but keep the goal in sight.

C. Build confidence over many iterations (team process & agile)

As you continue to deploy manually with a master script, you’ll iron out more details, contingencies, and problems. Over time You’ll gain confidence that the script does the job.

D. Employ continuous integration Tools to formalize process (CircleCI, Jenkins)

Now that you’ve formalized your deploy in code, putting these CI tools to use becomes easier. Because they’re custom built for you at this stage!

E. 10 deploys per day (long term goal)

Your longer term goal is 10 deploys a day. After you’ve automated tests, team confidence will grow around developers being able to deploy to production. On smaller teams of 1-5 people this may still be only 10 deploys per week, but still a useful benchmark.

Also: Top serverless interview questions for hiring aws lambda experts

2. What is microservices?

Microservices is about two-pizza teams. Small enough that there’s little beaurocracy. Able to be agile, focus on one business function. Iterate quickly without logjams with other business teams & functions.

Microservices interact with each other through APIs, deploy their own components, and use their own isolated data stores.

Function as a service, Amazon Lambda, or serverless computing enables microservices in a huge way.

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3. What is serverless computing?

Serverless computing is a model where servers & infrastructure do not need to be formalized. Only the code is deployed, and the platform, AWS Lambda for example, takes care of instant provisioning of containers & VMs when the code gets called.

Events within the cloud environment, such a file added to S3 bucket, trigger the serverless functions. API Gateway endpoints can also trigger the functions to run.

Authentication services are used for user login & identity management such as Auth0 or Amazon Cognito. The backend data store could be Dynamodb or Google’s Firebase for example.

Read: Can on-demand consulting save startups time & money?

4. What is containerization?

Containers are like faster deploying VMs. They have all the advantages of an image or snapshot of a server. Why is this useful? Because you can containerize your microservices, so each one does one thing. One has a webserver, with specific version of xyz.

Containers can also help with legacy applications, as you isolate older versions & dependencies that those applications still rely on.

Containers enable developers to setup environments quickly, and be more agile.

Also: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

5. What is CloudFormation?

CloudFormation, formalizes all of your cloud infrastructure into json files. Want to add an IAM user, S3 bucket, rds database, or EC2 server? Want to configure a VPC, subnet or access control list? All these things can be formalized into cloudformation files.

Once you’ve started down this road, you can checkin your infrastructure definitions into version control, and manage them just like you manage all your other code. Want to do unit tests? Have at it. Now you can test & deploy with more confidence.

Terraform is an extension of CloudFormation with even more power built in.

Also: What can startups learn from the DYN DNS outage?

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