What does DEV OPS mean?

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I was recently interviewed by Victor Farcic. He asked me a lot of interesting questions.

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One really struck me that I thought was important, about the whole devops movement.

How do you define devops

Viktor Farcic: Moving on to a more general subject, how would you define DevOps? I’ve gotten a different answer from every single person I’ve asked.

Sean Hull: I have a lot of opinions about it actually. I wrote an article on my blog a few years ago called The Four-Letter Word Dividing Dev and Ops, with the implication being that the four-letter word might be a swear word, akin to the development team swearing at the operations team, and the operations team swearing at the development team. But the four-letter word I was referring to was “risk.”

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

To summarize my article, in my view the development and the operations teams of old were separate silos in business, and they had very different mandates. Developers are tasked with writing code to build a product and to answer the needs of the customers, while directly building change into and facilitating a more sophisticated product. So, their thinking from day to day is about change and answering the requirements of the products team.
On the other hand, the operations team’s mandate is stability. It’s, “I don’t want these systems going down at 2:00 a.m.” So, over the long term, the operations teams are thinking about being as conservative as possible and having fewer moving parts, less code, and less new technologies. The simpler your stack is, the more reliable it is and the more robust and less likely it is to fail. I think the traditional reason why developers and operations teams were separated into silos was because of those two very different mandates.

Also: Walking the delicate balance of transparency

They’re two different ways of prioritizing your work and your priorities when you think about the business and the technology. However, the downside was that those teams didn’t really communicate very well, and they were often at each other’s throats, pushing each other in opposite directions. But to answer your question, “what is DevOps?” I think of DevOps as a cultural movement that has made efforts to allow those teams to communicate better, and that’s a really good thing.

Read: One time in 2013 I had to take the fall

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