How can we keep cloud architectures simple?

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I was reading hacker news, as I often do. And I found David Futcher’s post You Don’t Need all That Complex/Expensive/Distracting Infrastructure..

Of course it caught my attention. You may be surprised by the reasons

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One quote that should raise your eyebrows…

I’ve seen the idea that every minute spent on infrastructure is a minute less spent shipping features

Here’s what I think…

1. Performance tuning is often about removing things

That sounds strange right? How can performance tuning be about removing things?

Here are a few examples:

o removing results: When you add an index you remove data, returning just the pieces you need.
o removing lag time: When you remove time, you get faster response. This cascades through your entire application, allowing more requests to get handled in a fixed amount of time. On AWS you get allocated a faster NIC when you use a larger instance size. It’s automatic, though somewhat invisible.
o removing data: By trimming tables, access speeds go up. Reads are faster when you hit the whole table, because there’s fewer records to sift through. Writes are faster because you are maintaining smaller associated indexes.
o removing codepaths: By having fewer libraries, and layers between your application, and the data it retrieves, you have less overhead. And that translates to quicker response time too.
o removing databases: If you’re fully microservices, you have a database behind every service. This means your service sometimes proxies just to get at data that has been decoupled. By consolidating databases to a shared db model, you reduce this cross-traffic dramatically.

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2. Are we just building what everyone else does?

In technology as with any other industry, following the big trends is safe. If you’re building an architecture that is used by Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix & Google are using, you’re on the best path, right? Certainly few would criticise their success. So yes it is safe. Even if it fails.

Going with a much simpler architecture, that has even a whiff of so-called legacy, may seem like bucking the trend. But fewer moving parts means less to break, less to manage, and less to tune.

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3. Customers don’t care

Remember, customers aren’t devops gurus nor do they care about Rust versus Swift versus Elixir. What they care about is they can comment on their social media app or order your widget. They want your product to work.

They don’t care if it is hosted in the cloud, or at a managed datacenter. They probably don’t even care about tiny short outages either. What they do care about is that it works, and works well. And fast.

If your infrastructure allows you to be responsive to customers, roll out new product features & updates, you’re going to have some happy customers. The end!

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