Tag Archives: docker

Sean Hull interviewed on the Doppler Cloud podcast

I recently got a chance to talk with Mike Kavis over at Cloud Technology Partners. It was fun to get away from the keyboard, and in front of the microphone for a change.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Docker

Docker is making deployments easier & easier. But as the pace accelerates, are we introducing vulnerabilities & scalability problems faster than we can fix them?

Also: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

2. Redshift

I’ve blogged that I don’t work with recruiters but I do chat with them regularly.

In a recent conversation a recruiter asked me:

“Why is it that suddenly everyone is looking for Redshift?”

I’m seeing the same trend. And if you look at Hadoop you might see why. Writing SQL queries against Redshift data is wildly simpler than writing EMR jobs for Hadoop.

Related: Why Dropbox didn’t have to fail?

3. Devops automation

These days I hear a lot of talk that all operations is software development. Are you still SSHing into boxes. You’re doing it wrong!

Read: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

4. Hardware solves all speed problems

Having performance problems? Scale out! Database slow, scale up! These days it seems the old short sighted way of thinking is back with a vengence. Throw hardware at the problem and kick the can down the road.

Also: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck?

5. Amazon disrupting VC

During dot-com version one-point-oh, you’d need hundreds of thousands to buy hardware & software licenses to get an idea off the ground. That necessarily meant real VC money to get off the ground.

Amazon web services & on-demand computing has brought world class infrastructure to even the smallest startups. For just dollars, they can get started.

Now we’re seeing startups get going with micro investments from the likes of Angel List syndicates. Cutting traditional VCs right out of the equation.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Which tech do startups use most?

MySQL on Amazon Cloud AWS

Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures publishes an excellent blog called Coding VC. There you can find some excellent posts, such as pitches by analogy, and an algorithm for seed round valuations and analyzing product hunt data.

He recently wrote a blog post about a topic near and dear to my heart, Which Technologies do Startups Use. It’s worth a look.

One thing to keep in mind looking over the data, is that these are AngelList startups. So that’s not a cross section of all startups, nor does it cover more mature companies either.

In my experience startups can get it right by starting fresh, evaluating the spectrum of new technologies out there, balancing sheer solution power with a bit of prudence and long term thinking.

I like to ask these questions:

o Which technologies are fast & high performance?
o Which technologies have a big, vibrant & robust community?
o Which technologies can I find plenty of engineers to support?
o Which technologies have low operational overhead?
o Which technologies have low development overhead?

1. Database: MySQL

MySQL holds a slight lead according to the AngelList data. In my experience its not overly complex to setup and there are some experienced DBAs out there. That said database expertise can still be hard to find .

We hear a lot about MongoDB these days, and it is surely growing in popularity. Although it doesn’t support joins and arbitrary slicing and dicing of data, it is a very powerful database engine. If your application needs more straightforward data access, it can bring you amazing speed improvements.

Postgres is a close third. It’s a very sophisticated database engine. Although it may have a smaller community than MySQL, overall it’s a more full featured database. I’d have no reservations recommending it.

Also: Top MySQL DBA Interview questions

2. Hosting: Amazon

Amazon Web Services is obviously the giant in the room. They’re big, they’re cheap, they’re nimble. You have a lot of options for server types, they’ve fixed many of the problems around disk I/O and so forth. Although you may still experience latency around multi-tenant related problems, you’ll benefit from a truly global reach, and huge cost savings from the volume of customers they support.

Heroku is included although they’re a different type of service. In some sense their offering is one part operations team & one part automation. Yes ultimately you are getting hosting & virtualization, but some things are tied down. Amazon RDS provides some parallels here. I wrote Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?. Long term you’re likely going to switch to an AWS, Joyent or Rackspace for real scale.

I was surprised to see Azure on the list at all here, as I rarely see startups build on microsoft technologies. It may work for the desktop & office, but it’s not the right choice for the datacenter.

Read: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

3. Languages: Javascript

Javascript & Node.js are clearly very popular. They are also highly scalable.

In my experience I see a lot of PHP & of course Ruby too. Java although there is a lot out there, can tend to be a bear as a web dev language, and provide some additional complication, weight and overhead.

Related: Is Hunter Walk right about operations & startups?

4. Search: Elastic Search

I like that they broke apart search technology as a separate category. It is a key component of most web applications, and I do see a lot of Elastic Search & Solr.

That said I think this may be a bit skewed. I think by far the number one solution would be NO SPECIFIC SEARCH technology. That’s right, many times devs choose a database centric approach, like FULLTEXT or others that perform painfully bad.

If this is you, consider these search solutions. They will bring you huge performance gains.

Check this: Are SQL Databases Dead?

5. Automation: Chef

As with search above, I’d argue there is a far more prevalent trend, that is #1 to use none of these automation technologies.

Although I do think chef, docker & puppet can bring you real benefits, it’s a matter of having them in the right hands. Do you have an operations team that is comfortable with using them? When they leave in a years time, will your new devops also know the technology you’re using? Can you find a good balance between automation & manual configuration, and document accordingly?

Read: Why are database & operations experts so hard to find?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters