Tag Archives: cloud

Top questions to ask a devops expert when hiring or preparing for job & interview

xkcd_goodcode
Strip by Randall Munroe; xkcd.com

Whether your a hiring manager, head of HR or recruiter, you are probably looking for a devops expert. These days good ones are not easy to find. The spectrum of tools & technologies is broad. To manage today’s cloud you need a generalist.

Join 33,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

If you’re a devops expert and looking for a job, these are also some essential questions you should have in your pocket. Be able to elaborate on these high level concepts as they’re crucial in todays agile startups.

Check out: 8 questions to ask an aws ec2 expert

Also new: Top questions to ask on a devops expert interview

And: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

1. How do you automate deployments?

A. Get your code in version control (git)

Believe it or not there are small 1 person teams that haven’t done this. But even with those, there’s real benefit. Get on it!

B. Evolve to one script push-button deploy (script)

If deploying new code involves a lot of manual steps, move file here, set config there, set variable, setup S3 bucket, etc, then start scripting. That midnight deploy process should be one master script which includes all the logic.

It’s a process to get there, but keep the goal in sight.

C. Build confidence over many iterations (team process & agile)

As you continue to deploy manually with a master script, you’ll iron out more details, contingencies, and problems. Over time You’ll gain confidence that the script does the job.

D. Employ continuous integration Tools to formalize process (CircleCI, Jenkins)

Now that you’ve formalized your deploy in code, putting these CI tools to use becomes easier. Because they’re custom built for you at this stage!

E. 10 deploys per day (long term goal)

Your longer term goal is 10 deploys a day. After you’ve automated tests, team confidence will grow around developers being able to deploy to production. On smaller teams of 1-5 people this may still be only 10 deploys per week, but still a useful benchmark.

Also: Top serverless interview questions for hiring aws lambda experts

2. What is microservices?

Microservices is about two-pizza teams. Small enough that there’s little beaurocracy. Able to be agile, focus on one business function. Iterate quickly without logjams with other business teams & functions.

Microservices interact with each other through APIs, deploy their own components, and use their own isolated data stores.

Function as a service, Amazon Lambda, or serverless computing enables microservices in a huge way.

Related: Which engineering roles are in greatest demand?

3. What is serverless computing?

Serverless computing is a model where servers & infrastructure do not need to be formalized. Only the code is deployed, and the platform, AWS Lambda for example, takes care of instant provisioning of containers & VMs when the code gets called.

Events within the cloud environment, such a file added to S3 bucket, trigger the serverless functions. API Gateway endpoints can also trigger the functions to run.

Authentication services are used for user login & identity management such as Auth0 or Amazon Cognito. The backend data store could be Dynamodb or Google’s Firebase for example.

Read: Can on-demand consulting save startups time & money?

4. What is containerization?

Containers are like faster deploying VMs. They have all the advantages of an image or snapshot of a server. Why is this useful? Because you can containerize your microservices, so each one does one thing. One has a webserver, with specific version of xyz.

Containers can also help with legacy applications, as you isolate older versions & dependencies that those applications still rely on.

Containers enable developers to setup environments quickly, and be more agile.

Also: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

5. What is CloudFormation?

CloudFormation, formalizes all of your cloud infrastructure into json files. Want to add an IAM user, S3 bucket, rds database, or EC2 server? Want to configure a VPC, subnet or access control list? All these things can be formalized into cloudformation files.

Once you’ve started down this road, you can checkin your infrastructure definitions into version control, and manage them just like you manage all your other code. Want to do unit tests? Have at it. Now you can test & deploy with more confidence.

Terraform is an extension of CloudFormation with even more power built in.

Also: What can startups learn from the DYN DNS outage?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Key lessons from the Devops Handbook

I picked up a copy of the DevOps Handbook.

This is not a book about how to setup Amazon servers, how to use git, codePipeline or Jenkins. It’s not about Chef or Ansible or other tools.

Join 33,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

This is a book about processes & people. It’s about how & why automation & world-class infrastructure will make your business more agile, raise quality & increase productivity.

1. Infrastructure in version control

With technologies like Terraform and CloudFormation, the entire state of your infrastructure can be captured. That means you can manage it just like any other code.

Also: Myth of five nines – Why high availability is overrated

2. Pushbutton builds

You’ve heard it before. Automate your builds. That means putting everything in version control, from environment building scripts, to configs, artifacts & reference data. Once you can do that, you’re on your way to automating production deploys completely.

Related: 5 ways to move data to amazon redshift

3. Devs & Ops comingled

In the devops world, devs should learn about operations, infrastructure, performance & more. What’s more operations teams should work closely with devs.

Read: Why were dev & ops siloed job roles?

4. Servers as cattle not pets

In the old days, we logged into servers & provided personal care & feeding. We treated them like pets.

In the new world of devops, we should treat servers like cattle. When it begins to fail, take it out back and shoot it. (tbh i don’t love the analogy, but it carries some meaning…)

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Open to learnings & failures

Organizations that are open to failures, without playing the blame game, learn quicker & recover from problems faster.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

Everyone is hot under the collar again. So-called serverless or no-ops services are popping up everywhere allowing you to deploy “just code” into the cloud. Not only won’t you have to login to a server, you won’t even have to know they’re there.

As your code is called, but cloud events such a file upload, or hitting an http endpoint, your code runs. Behind the scene through the magic of containers & autoscaling, Amazon & others are able to provision in milliseconds.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Pretty cool. Yes even as it outsources the operations role to invisible teams behind Amazon Lambda, Google Cloud Functions or Webtask it’s also making companies more agile, and allowing startup innovation to happen even faster.

Believe it or not I’m a fan too.

That said I thought it would be fun to poke a hole in the bubble, and throw some criticisms at the technology. I mean going serverless today is still bleeding edge, and everyone isn’t cut out to be a pioneer!

With that, here’s 30 questions to throw on the serverless fanboys (and ladies!)…

1. Security

o Are you comfortable removing the barrier around your database?
o With more services, there is more surface area. How do you prevent malicious code?
o How do you know your vendor is doing security right?
o How transparent is your vendor about vulnerabilities?

Also: Myth of five nines – Why high availability is overrated

2. Testing

o How do you do integration testing with multiple vendor service components?
o How do you test your API Gateway configurations?
o Is there a way to version control changes to API Gateway configs?
o Can Terraform or CloudFormation help with this?
o How do you do load testing with a third party db backend?
o Are your QA tests hitting the prod backend db?
o Can you easily create & destroy test dbs?

Related: 5 ways to move data to amazon redshift

3. Management

o How do you do zero downtime deployments with Lambda?
o Is there a way to deploy functions in groups, all at once?
o How do you manage vendor lock-in at the monitoring & tools level but also code & services?
o How do you mitigate your vendors maintenance? Downtime? Upgrades?
o How do you plan for move to alternate vendor? Database import & export may not be ideal, plus code & infrastructure would need to be duplicated.
o How do you manage a third party service for authentication? What are the pros & cons there?
o What are the pros & cons of using a service-based backend database?
o How do you manage redundancy of code when every client needs to talk to backend db?

Read: Why were dev & ops siloed job roles?

4. Monitoring & debugging

o How do you build a third-party monitoring tool? Where are the APIs?
o When you’re down, is it your app or a system-wide problem?
o Where is the New Relic for Lambda?
o How do you degrade gracefully when using multiple vendors?
o How do you monitor execution duration so your function doesn’t fail unexpectedly?
o How do you monitor your account wide limits so dev deploy doesn’t take down production?

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Performance

o How do you handle startup latency?
o How do you optimize code for mobile?
o Does battery life preclude a large codebase on client?
o How do you do caching on server when each invocation resets everything?
o How do you do database connection pooling?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

5 surprising features in Amazon’s Lambda serverless offering

Amazon is building out it’s serverless offering at a rapid clip. Lambda makes a great solution for a lot of different use cases including:

o a hybrid approach, building lambda functions for small pieces of your application, sitting along side your full application, working in concert with it

o working with Kinesis firehose to add ETL functionality into your pipeline. Extract Transform & Load is a method of transforming data from a relational or backend transactional databases, into one better fit for reporting & analytics.

o retrofitting your API? Layer Lambda functions in front, to allow you to rebuild in a managed way.

o a natural way to build microservices, with each function as it’s own little universe

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Great, tons of ways to put serverless to use. What’s Amazon doing to make it even better? Here are some of the features you’ll find indispensible in building with Lambda.

1. Versioned functions

As your serverless functions get more sophisticated, you’ll want to control & deploy different versions. Lambda supports this, allowing you to upload multiple copies of the same function. Coupled with Aliases below, this becomes a very powerful feature.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

2. Aliases

As you deploy multiple versions of your functions in AWS, you don’t want to recreate the API endpoints each time. That’s where aliases come in. Create one alias for dev, another for test, and a third for production. That way when new versions of those are deployed, all you have to do is change the alias & QA or customers will be hitting the new code. Cool!

Related: Are you getting errors building lambda functions?

3. Caching & throttling

Using the API gateway, we can do some fancy footwork with Lambda. First we can enabling caching to speedup access to our endpoint. Control the time-to-live, capacity of the cache easily. We’ll also need to invalidate the cache when we make changes & redeploy our functions.

Throttling is another useful feature, allowing you to control the maximum number of times your function can be called per second on average (the rate) and maximum number of times (burst limit). These can be set at both the stage & method levels.

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

4. Stage variables

Creating multiple stages, for dev, test & production means you can separate out and control environment variables with more granular control. For example suppose you have access & secret keys to reach S3. You can set environment variables for these to avoid committing any credentials or secrets in your code. Definitely don’t do that!

Allowing multiple copies of stage variables, means you can set them separately for dev, test & production.

Also: How to deploy on Amazon EC2 with Vagrant?

5. Logging

You can enable logging in your Lambda function configuration. This will send error and/or info warning messages out to CloudWatch.

You may also choose the log all of the request & response data. This is controlled in the API Gateway settings for individual stages.

Also: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

As cloud expands, does legacy grow too?

I was recently reading Drew Bell’s post Legacy systems are everywhere. It struck a deep chord for me.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Drew first touches on a story of upgrading an application with legacy components, taking pieces offline, and rebuilding to eliminate technical debt.

He then tells a parallel story of renovations in his new home. Well new for him, but an old building, with old building problems.

I’ve gone through some similar experiences so I thought I’d share some of those.

o A publishing company on AWS

I worked with one company in publishing. They had built a complex automation pipeline to deploy code. As a lead engineer planned to exit, I was brought in to provide support during transition. As with large complex websites, there was a lot that was done right, and some things done in old ways. Documenting all the pieces and digging up the dead bodies was a big part of the job.

Also: Is a dangerous anti-ops movement gaining momentum?

o Renovating a kitchen

In parallel to the above project, I was renovating my kitchen, in a new home in Brooklyn. Taking on this project myself, I dutifully assembled IKEA cabinents, and laid them out to spec. As I began the painstaking process of leveling for the countertop, I ran into trouble. Measurement after measurement didn’t add up. It seemed one section was shorter than another, where the counter should go.

Since I needed to add support for a dishwasher, that had to be measured correctly. Yet the level tool told a different story than the yardstick. Finally after thinking about it for a few hours, I put the level on the floor itself. Turns out the floor wasn’t level! That explained why cabinets were shorter in one area than another.

Also: How do we lock down systems from disgruntled engineers?

o Legacy in 5-7 years?

Complex systems like software, exhibit a lot of the same surprises as old buildings. That was one surprise I wasn’t expecting. As houses are renovated on the 15-30 year timeframe, software seems to experience a five to seven year cycle.

Whether a consequence of shifting sands in the underlying stack, databases, frameworks or cloud components, or the changing needs of product & customers

Also: Is AWS a patient that needs constant medication?

o Opportunity everywhere

As companies large & small migrate pieces of their systems to the cloud, move to microservices or rebuild on serverless, the opportunities are endless. It seems every firm is renovating their kitchen these days, putting on a new roof or upgrading their data pipeline.

Also: Is AWS too big to fail?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Does AWS have a dirty little secret?

tell a secret

I was recently talking with a colleague of mine about where AWS is today. Obviously there companies are migrating to EC2 & the cloud rapidly. The growth rates are staggering.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

The question was…

“What’s good and bad with Amazon today?”

It’s an interesting question. I think there some dirty little secrets here, but also some very surprising bright spots. This is my take.

1. VPC is not well understood  (FAIL)

This is the biggest one in my mind.  Amazon’s security model is all new to traditional ops folks.  Many customers I see deploy in “classic EC2”.  Other’s deploy haphazerdly in their own VPC, without a clear plan.

The best practices is to have one or more VPCs, with private & public subnet.  Put databases in private, webservers in public.  Then create a jump box in the public subnet, and funnel all ssh connections through there, allow any source IP, use users for authentication & auditing (only on this box), then use google-authenticator for 2factor at the command line.  It also provides an easy way to decommission accounts, and lock out users who leave the company.

However most customers have done little of this, or a mixture but not all of it.  So GETTING TO BEST PRACTICES around vpc, would mean deploying a vpc as described, then moving each and every one of your boxes & services over there.  Imagine the risk to production services.  Imagine the chances of error, even if you’re using Chef or your own standardized AMIs.

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

2. Feature fatigue (FAIL)

Another problem is a sort of “paradox of choice”.  That is that Amazon is releasing so many new offerings so quickly, few engineers know it all.  So you find a lot of shops implementing things wrong because they didn’t understand a feature.  In other words AWS already solved the problem.

OpenRoad comes to mind.  They’ve got media files on the filesystem, when S3 is plainly Amazon’s purpose-built service for this.  

Is AWS too complex for small dev teams & startups?

Related: Does Amazon eat it’s own dogfood? Apparently yes!

3. Required redundancy & automation  (FAIL)

The model here is what Netflix has done with ChaosMonkey.  They literally knock machines offline to test their setup.  The problem is detected, and new hardware brought online automatically.  Deploying across AZs is another example.  As Amazon says, we give you the tools, it’s up to you to implement the resiliency.

But few firms do this.  They’re deployed on Amazon as if it’s a traditional hosting platform.  So they’re at risk in various ways.  Of Amazon outages.  Of hardware problems under the VMs.  Of EBS network issues, of localized outages, etc.

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

4. Lambda  (WIN)

I went to the serverless conference a week ago.  It was exiting to see what is happening.  It is truely the *bleeding edge* of cloud.  IBM & Azure & Google all have a serverless offering now.  

The potential here is huge.  Eliminating *ALL* of the server management headaches, from packages to config management & scaling, hiding all of that could have a huge upside.  What’s more it takes the on-demand model even further.  YOu have no compute running idle until you hit an endpoint.  Cost savings could be huge.  Wonder if it has the potential to cannibalize Amazon’s own EC2 …  we’ll see.

Charity Majors wrote a very good critical piece – WTF is Operations? #serverless
WTF is operations? #serverless

Patrick Dubois 

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

5. Redshift  (WIN)

Seems like *everybody* is deploying a data warehouse on Redshift these days.  It’s no wonder, because they already have their transactional database, their web backend on RDS of some kind.  So it makes sense that Amazon would build an offering for reporting.

I’ve heard customers rave about reports that took 10 hours on MySQL run in under a minute on Redshift.  It’s not surprising because MySQL wasn’t built for the size servers it’s being deployed on today.  So it doesn’t make good use of all that memory.  Even with SSD drives, query plans can execute badly.

Also: Is there a better way to build a warehouse in 2016?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Some thoughts on 12 factor apps

12 factor app

I was talking with a colleague recently about an upcoming project.

In the summary of technologies, he listed 12 factor, microservices, containers, orchestration, CI and nodejs. All familiar to everyone out there, right?

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Actually it was the first I had heard of 12 factor, so I did a bit of reading.

1. How to treat your data resources

12 factor recommends that backing services be treated like attached resources. Databases are loosely coupled to the applications, making it easier to replace a badly behaving database, or connect multiple ones.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

2. Stay loosely coupled

In 12 Fractured Apps Kelsey Hightower adds that this loose coupling can be taken a step further. Applications shouldn’t even assume the database is available. Why not fall back to some useful state, even when the database isn’t online. Great idea!

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

3. Degrade gracefully

A read-only or browse-only mode is another example of this. Allow your application to have multiple decoupled database resources, some that are read-only. The application behaves intelligently based on what’s available. I’ve advocated those before in Why Dropbox didn’t have to fail.

Read: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

Conclusion

The twelve-factor app appears to be an excellent guideline on building cleaning applications that are easier to deploy and manage. I’ll be delving into it more in future posts, so check back!

Read: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Does Linux tell the Gilgamesh story of hacker culture?

stephenson command line

Is the command line still essential?
Was Stephenson right about his Linux

It’s been a while since I read Stephenson’s essay on Linux. It’s one of those pieces that’s so well written, we need to go back to it now & then.

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

This quote caught my eye right away.

“…as living in a commune, where much lip service was paid to ideals of peace, love and harmony, had deprived them of normal, socially approved outlets for their control freakdom, it tended to come out in other invariably more sinister ways. Applying this to the case of Apple Computer will be left as an exercise for the reader, and not a very difficult exercise.”

Anyone who has read about Steve Jobs will chuckle at this one.

1. The Hole Hawg of the internet

When Stephenson wrote this it was 1999. Linux adoption was growing at internet startups, where cost was everything, and risks could be taken. Remember this was before the two biggest data center companies even existed, namely Google & Amazon. Without Linux, neither would be here today!

hole hawg power

Linux was and is today more like a Hole Hawg for the internet, powerful, but dangerous in the wrong hands. 🙂


“The Hole Hawg is like the genie of the ancient fairy tales, who carries out his masters instructions literally and precisely and with unlimited power, often with disasterous unforseen consequences.”

Also: Why I like Etsy’s site performance report

2. Unix as oral history, our Gilgamesh

gilgamesh unix


“Unix, by contrast is not so much a product as it is a painstakingly compiled oral history of the hacker subculture. It is our Gilgamesh. What made old epics like Gilgamesh so powerful and so long-lived was that they were living bodies of narrative that many people knew by heart, and told over and over again — making their own personal embellishments whenever it struck their fancy.”

Also: Are SQL Databases dead?

3. The bizarre Trinity Torvalds, Stallman & Gates


“In trying to understand the Linux phenomenon, then, we have to look not to a single innovator but to a sort of bizarre Trinity, Linus Torvalds, Richard Stallman and Bill Gates. Take away any of these three & Linux would not exist.”

And indeed we must thank all three of these characters for where the internet stands today. The cloud is possible because of Linux & cheap intel hardware. And the GNU free software to go along with it.

Related: Did MySQL & Mongo have a beautiful baby called Aurora?

4. On the meaning of “Open Source”


“Source files are useless to your computer, and of little interest to most users, but they are of gigantic cultural & political significance, because Microsoft & Apple keep them secret, while Linux makes them public. They are the family Jewels. They are the sort of thing that in Hollywood thrillers is used as a McGuffin: the plutonium bomb core, the top-secret blueprints, the suitcase of bearer bonds, the reel of microfilm.

Read: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

5. What about Apple today?


“The ideal OS for me would be one that had a well-designed GUI that was easy to set up and use, but that included terminal windows where I could revert to the command line interface and run GNU software when it made sense.”

Stephenson wrote this before Apple has rebuilt their OS to sit on top of Unix. And that’s where we are today with Mac OS X!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon??

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is AWS the patient that needs constant medication?

storm coming

I was just reading High Scalability about Why Swiftype moved off Amazon EC2 to Softlayer and saw great wins!

We’ve all heard by now how awesome the cloud is. Spinup infrastructure instantly. Just add water! No up front costs! Autoscale to meet seasonal application demands!

But less well known or even understood by most engineering teams are the seasonal weather patterns of the cloud environment itself!

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Sure there are firms like Netflix, who have turned the fickle cloud into one of virtues & reliability. But most of the firms I work with everyday, have moved to Amazon as though it’s regular bare-metal. And encountered some real problems in the process.

1. Everyday hardware outages

Many of the firms I’ve seen hosted on AWS don’t realize the servers fail so often. Amazon actually choosing cheap commodity components as a cost-savings measure. The assumption is, resilience should be built into your infrastructure using devops practices & automation tools like Chef & Puppet.

The sad reality is most firms provision the usual way, through the dashboard, with no safety net.

Also: Is your cloud speeding for a scalability cliff

2. Ongoing network problems

Network latency is a big problem on Amazon. And it will affect you more. One reason is you’re most likely sitting on EBS as your storage. EBS? That’s elastic block storage, it’s Amazon’s NAS solution. Your little cheapo instance has to cross the network to get to storage. That *WILL* affect your performance.

If you’re not already doing so, please start using their most important & easily missed performance feature – provisioned IOPS.

Related: The chaos theory of cloud scalability

3. Hard to be as resilient as netflix

We’ve by now heard of firms such as Netflix building their Chaos Monkey to actively knock out servers, in effort to test their ability to self-healing infrastructure.

From what I’m seeing at startups, most have a bit of devops in place, a bit of automation, such as autoscaling around the webservers. But little in terms of cross-region deployments. What’s more their database tier is protected only by multi-az or just a read-replica or two. These are fine for what they are, but will require real intervention when (not if) the server fails.

I recommend building a browse-only mode for your application, to eliminate downtime in these cases.

Read: 8 questions to ask an aws expert

4. Provisioning isn’t your only problem

But the cloud gives me instant infrastructure. I can spinup servers & configure components through an API! Yes this is a major benefit of the cloud, compared to 1-2 hours in traditional environments like Softlayer or Rackspace. But you can also compare that with an outage every couple of years! Amazon’s hardware may fail a couple times a hear, more if you’re unlucky.

Meanwhile you’re going to deal with season weather problems *INSIDE* your datacenter. Think of these as swarms of customers invading your servers, like a DDOS attack, but self-inflicted.

Amazon is like a weak immune system attacking itself all the time, requiring constant medication to keep the host alive!

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

5. RDS is going to bite you

Besides all these other problems, I’m seeing more customers build their applications on the managed database solution MySQL RDS. I’ve found RDS terribly hard to manage. It introduces downtime at every turn, where standard MySQL would incur none.

In my experience Upgrading RDS is like a shit-storm that will not end!

Also: Does open source enable the cloud?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is Apple betting against big data?

apple_android

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Pushing privacy

Apple has been pushing it’s privacy policy of late, in much of it’s marketing around the new iOS 8 and iPhone 6.

In particular Tim Cook takes direct aim at Google’s collection of user data:

“A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product. But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy.”

Read: Is Fred Wilson wrong about Apple?

2. Weak in cloud

It’s been quoted in various news that Apple is rather “weak” in the cloud. But digging a little deeper, this appears to be a deliberate strategy, a bet against using customer data in ways those end users may grow to resent.

Also: Is the Android ecosystem still broken?

3. The bet against open worked

Recall that Apple has had a fairly closed ecosystem since the beginning. This has kept their AppStore much cleaner, and free of malware. Reference the terrible problems that still plague the Android Play Store, from lack of policing.

Open also works as an iron fist on UI & UX, enforcing a consistency across apps and developers. This is a clear win for consumers and end users, even if they don’t understand the hows, whys and wherefores.

Related: No iPhones were harmed in the creation of this outage

4. Don’t monetize what you store in iCloud

Apple doesn’t directly monetize what is stored in iCloud. That means there’s no business imperative to make *use* of your data. They’re just storing it. This means they can also push encryption, a win for consumers, as it doesn’t bump heads with their business in any way.

Check this: What is mobile scalability & why is it important?

5. iAd has real privacy limits

Apple does have a platform called iAd. But even that has in-built limitations.

“iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.”

It’s unclear if all of these moves will help Apple in the marketplace. It remains to be seen if consumers will choose technology based on privacy concerns and fears.

Read this: How to increase newsletter signups with nifty iphone trick

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters