Can daily notes help you work better with clients?

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Years ago I was working at a customer for a few weeks. There was some confusion as to what was going on, in terms of progress. Things weren’t moving as quickly as they expected.

After a lot of back and forth, I suggested I could provide detailed notes of what I had done.

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After I put together my in-depth notes the customer was really happy. It seems these notes had highlighted a few problems that they didn’t know about. What’s more they even highlighted some people issues, where communicate was blocked. Whats more the notes underlined what I was doing, and this really improved the customers confidence in the work product.

1. Visibility

Keeping daily notes is a habit I found useful over and over again. If your client or customer comes to you and says, why are we paying $X, you can provide the notes as a detailed explanation of what they have gotten for their money.

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2. Transparency

Transparency is a door that swings both ways. As I mentioned above it can be great when the customer is not sure how much work was done, or what the bill is for. But it can also highlight things they may not want done. For instance perhaps you were investigating a problem authenticating to a server. You determined that it was an important piece.

When the customer sees this in your notes they may say “Oh we don’t need to deal with that system. Please leave it alone” or they may say “We actually have Rakesh available to help us with that piece, so please communicate with him and he can resolve that”.

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3. Trust

Most important of all, keeping detailed notes helps build trust. Many customers, hiring managers & CTOs are not command-line technical. And that’s perfectly normal. However looking over a long list of notes like these provides great insight to them as to what you do from day-to-day.

Do they need to know what every line means? No. But the visibility goes a long long way toward building trust in the consultant client relationship.

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Week 1 April 1 – April 10

Here’s a sample of the kind notes I keep. Actually they cover a ten day period, but that’s because the initial day was towards the end of a week.

Friday April 1st
o coord with Jake on getting started
o dropbox for password, creds & server docs
o reviewing system network diagram
o reviewing techlist excel doc
– techlist
– server list & access
– database access
– projects -old
o reviewing systems access.docx
o testing AWS login credentials
– issue with permissions
– coordinating with Jake on Admin access
o testing AWS creds again
– access to all AWS services
– IAM for seanhull user
– enabling MFA for user
o questions for outgoing op Roger

Sat April 2nd (no hours)

Sun April 3rd (no hours)

Mon April 4th
o coord with Jake to get onboarded
o sending W9 form to Acme Inc.
o setup slack
o plan for today
– review aws servers
– review dg servers
– questions for Roger
– review docs
o coord with Roger on VPN access
– reach out to Larry
– emailed Larry CC Jake
– Larry requests Acme access CC to mgmt
– turns out VPN access isn’t required
– can just whitelist IP inside the relevant security groups
– coord with J, going ahead to add whitelist 1.2.3.4/32
o updating Acmemedia-sandbox security group
– trying to reach host, coord with Roger
– asked to drop ssh key onto servers
– asked about .ssh/config file – Did you get from Jake?
– found the AWS PEM folder that I overlooked 🙂
o configuring .ssh/config file
– copying up to iheavy.com
– setting permissions 600 on pem files
– ssh to sandbox successful!!
o adding whitelist to Acmemedia-prod security group
o updating Jake – access is working

Tue April 5th
o coord with Jake on todo list for today
o verifying mysql access
– review security groups
– no whitelisted IPs
– can reach from webserver?
– test db1 MySQL access via webserver, OK
– test db2 MySQL access via webserver OK
o reviewing monitoring system
– testing nagios access
– locating configurations
– reviewing dashboard
– understanding tests
– down system db1 – 108 days – why?
– down system p1 – LB1 sailthru check down for 85 days why?
– down staging – 174 days why?
– emailed nagios questions to Roger
– request to add me to nagios notifications group
o coord with Roger on questions
– nagios setup & stopped checks
– add to admin group
o github access for sandbox details doc
o login to Acmemedia wp
– check list of 25 plugins
– review recent backups on abc (8)
o login to DDD wordpress
– check list of 33 plugins
– review recent backups in abc (8)
o login to EEE wordpress
– check list of 31 plugins
– review recent backups in abc (37)
o login to FFF wordpress
– check list of 35 plugins
– review recent backups in abc (8)
o login to DDD
o login to EEE
o login to FFF
o emailed Roger – request details about Glasgow server
o review various Acme github pages

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Wed April 6th
o coord with Jake on todos for today
o reviewing github pages docs on various system processes
– git deployment server page
– git deployment process
– new deploy process Nov 2015
– wiki pages are a bit sparse overall
o tested jenkins login
– found API cache clear
– found varnish cache clear
o understand separation of dev & production
o digging into Jenkins docs
o understanding build process
o tried login to EEEv2 wp login, don’t have pass
– coordinating with Jake on that login
o checking on nfs disk full nagios alert
– can’t reach box
– notified Jake & Roger via slack
– slack with Lester
– yes nfs01 space 90% is normal
– new launch of EEE tomorrow & old stuff will be deleted then
o updating nfs security group
– ssh login working now.
o getting diskspace error on prod04
– messaged Lester, related to EEE launch tonight
o email from Jake – local dev & test environment setups are slow
– very overengineered for simple wordpress site
– not using multisites, so have FOUR SEPARATE setups
– different plugins on each install
– four sets of logins
– four places to update
– four places to test/qa
– migration may be complex based on custom Acme plugins
– shortcodes compatability across four sites
– not using ithemes security plugin
o discuss with Lester on slack
– API is hosted on datagram
– single point of failure for the site currently
– outage there would take the site down
– migrate to AWS using internal loadbalancer & webservers in 2 AZs

Thu April 7th
o call with Jake on EEEv2 launch today
– general observations of Acme sites & architecture
o reviewing access.Acmemedia.com
o discuss with Jake
– hosting media files on S3 vs nfs
– using multisite
– using wordpress through API only
– javascript based static site builder
– moving API to amazon EC2
– create slave MySQL db of master MySQL currently in datadotnet
o discuss with Roger
– launch plan
– two vhosts new.EEE.com
– old.EEE.com
– simply restart apache to enable switch
– refresh maxCDN after launch
o review EEEv2 deploy steps
– pre-deploy steps
– DNS for old.EEE.com
– add vhosts EEEv2.conf
– restart apache
– restart varnish
– clear maxcdn
o verified login to access.Acmemedia.com
– API log is in /var/log/httpd/production-access.log
– login as sandy & root
o not able to login to dashboard.Acmemedia.com
– tried admin & pass in datagram docs

o meeting onsite with Jake & Roger
– discuss deployment process
– discuss legacy systems
– discuss NFS vs S3 for media files
– discuss plugins & management
– discuss wordpress version upgrade process
– discuss plugin version upgrade process
– discuss Jenkins access, configs, success & error logs
– discuss managing secrets file
– script that takes webserver out of load balancer while apache restarting
o met Rachel, Louis, Lester, Rick, Stuart, Jack

Fri April 8th
o testing Acme stage build
o emailed Roger further questions
– where is secrets file configuration & process
– composer is PHP dependency management
– what are the steps to upgrade plugin only
o summarizing & notes on Acme
o put together steps for complete firedrill
– questions for Roger, requesting help with process
– build webserver with varnish & apache
– should setup separate NFS server
– should use Acmemedia.com bc it uses API heavily
– setup copy of API server & db
– setup mysql instance for wordpress
– setup amazon cloudfront for content
o outline additional questions for Roger
– how to upgrade plugin only
– composer for php dependency management
– how are secrets files managed & deployed outside developer access
o secrets management
– asked Roger for clarificaiton
o plugin-only installs
– reviewed jenkins configs
– various questions to Roger
– composer:install seems to be the key change (not just deploy which does all?)
– why is STAGING PLUGIN DEPLOY for ORIM different?
o what happens when github account is disabled!!
– jenkins changes for new github deploy account
– THIS WOULD BREAK ALL DEPLOYS & CI/CD pipeline
– capistrano changes?
– any other changes on sandbox
– any other dependencies for Roger github?
o email step-by-step outline to add a plugin
– reviewing steps with Roger
– making sure no missing pieces

Sat April 9th (1 off-hour)
o receiving nagios alert for p1
o emailed Roger, Jake about issue
o slack messaged Jake
o raises question about off-hours coverage

Sun April 10th (2 off-hours)

o p1 still throwing errors
o coordinating with Lester & Ralph on Slack
– reiterated this is *not* an issue with NFS
– because of large number of nagios alerts, p1 lost in the shuffle
– p1 is new error, 97% so more dire than the NFS issue
– Lester attempting to login, fails because of AWS security group
– adding his *own* home IP as whitelist (devs have access to AWS console)
– first time logging in from home?
– Lester deleted old DDD logfiles to clear up 1.2G
– plan to touch base again tomorrow about issue
o emailing Jake about status
o questions for Jake
– how to manage on-call & alerts
– how to manage developer access
– Roger mentioned secrets files are not shared with devs
o Lester questions, comments on servers & diskspace

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When prospects mislead

MUHAMMAD ALI ROCKS GEORGE FOREMAN ON THE JAW

While a story is fresh in ones mind, it’s a great time to tell it. And so I set out to putting pen to paper about a recent consulting war story.

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A financial services firm reached out to me, asking about services. We discussed the project plan, and the day after the call I sent along a quote. I suggested three options, a weekly fee, a monthly one, or monthly with advance payment.

They decided to go with option C, and we arranged a kickoff meeting.

1. Level setting on trust

I’ve done this kind of work for so long, and worked with so many clients over the years, that it sometimes becomes second nature. I arrived, and we chatted amicably. I asked him about his wikipedia page, which he seemed excited to talk about.

I was surprised that there wasn’t a check ready, as we had decided on advanced payment in full, but didn’t make a mention right away. He then tried to dial in his partner, but that just went to voicemail. So we continued the meeting without him.

I don’t know how important the meeting was to both team members, but they were both on the invite & emails. His partner never called back through the meeting either.

Read this: When migrating from Oracle to MySQL Prepare to Bushwack

2. Negotiations is part art & dance

Interestingly I had met up with some colleagues the night before over italian food. I mentioned I was meeting a new prospect the next day, but had reservations about whether they had really decided to hire me, or were just still prospecting.

So during the meeting I was somewhat conscious of that question. Are we already in exploratory, discovery mode? Has the project even begun? That’s a question, and from what I sensed it was still an open one.

As the meeting wore on, questions about oracle licenses, versions, and EC2 configurations came up. Furious note taking continues.

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3. Time & mismanagement

One thing that comes up for me in these situations is questions of time management. In order to work with a new client, I must clear my schedule, and make time available. That has a value to start with. When it turns out a project isn’t actually ready yet, it becomes an awkward stumble out of the gates.

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4. Can you research this one thing

As I raised various concerns about Oracle, the data loader portion, and unknowns around how that software worked, the prospect asked if I could do a little research for them.

This is where things started to crack. Rather than answer the question, I made a more aggressive nod to the question on my mind: Have we really started on this project yet? I explained that I was confused, and gathered from our email this this was a kickoff meeting. The tension in the air rose noticeably.

He then explained “Well we’re still waiting to hear back from a vendor about XYZ”. From there I began to gather up my things.

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5. Watch out for those Rothkos

As I stand up I comment on the digs. “Is this shared office space, those look like Rothkos?” I ask. “Nope this is all ours, my wife is a collector & art dealer. We have some real Warhol’s too”. “Wow…”, I respond, “tough business to be in!”. With that he says “Well it is very volatile, we can be out of business in a month.”

My take away here isn’t to be wary of all new prospects. Each person or business has their own *style* of doing business. Rather, until you’ve established trust with a new client, consider that you may not yet be working on the project at all.

And with that the dance continues. While you may wish to demonstrate and illustrate your knowledge, and the solutions you’d recommend, beware of solving the problem before you’re even hired!

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

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5 Things I learned about bitcoin from Chris Dixon, Balaji Srinivasan & a16z

I’ve avoided the bitcoin hype for long enough. I’ve watched a bit on the periphery, but recently been doing a bit more research. Then I bumped into the new Andreessen Horowitz podcast, and got a crash course on it!

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Why Bitcoin Matters

1. Goldman Sacks has taken notice

Want proof that Bitcoin isn’t just for geeks? Goldman has released a report and they have real interest.

Specifically Goldman identified the potential for 210 billion dollars in savings in payments that Bitcoin could bring. That’s billion with a “B” and serious opportunity for disruption!

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2. Solves online trust problem

There are many who feel Bitcoin doesn’t have potential as a currency. But even those folks feel it’s underlying technology could solve a big problem with online payments, the general ledger problem.

When you want to send digital things, whether a signature, contract, keys or currency, you need a way to establish trust between people. Bitcoin solves this with it’s technical sounding “block chain” which serves as a sort of internet notary public. Anyone can check on this common general ledger the status of a transaction, without fear of compromise, double entries or theft.

For more in-depth discussion, check out Bitcoin & the Byzantine Generals problem. It explains the general ledger aka the block chain in a lot more detail.

Related: Are SQL databases dying out?

3. Better digital wallets

Although currently bitcoin wallets are banned on the iphone AppStore, the potential there is huge. Currently there still isn’t a good digital wallet solution, and bitcoin sits nicely in that space.

Bitcoin is more a platform, and a set of protocols, a new digital infrastructure that solves a lot of big problems online. As new apps are built on top of it, they abstract away the technical complexity, providing day-to-day

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4. Store of value for Greek & Cyprus

Citizens of distressed countries can face the fear of their savings eroding away. That can happen rather quickly as we’ve seen in Greece & Cyprus. Savings in Bitcoin presents an alternate currency within which one could place some of their savings. Since it’s not controlled by any government or power, it provides a hedge against such fears.

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5. Say goodbye to inflation

Fiat currency, as it’s known, is the currency we live with today. It’s the post gold standard currency, where the federal reserve controls the money supply. Quantitative easing, aka printing money, is the lever the fed uses to keep a small steady inflation on the money supply.

With the gold standard before it, and potentially through something like Bitcoin, you eliminate the government meddling, and inflation along with it. Some argue this would reduce or even eliminate the so-called moral hazard in the present system. With the gold standard, large & systemic firms cannot be bailed out, so they have a huge insensitive to behave prudently, or fail.

Read: Why AirBNB didn’t have to fail

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