Tag Archives: S3

Some irresistible reading for March – outages, code, databases, legacy & hiring

via GIPHY

I decided this week to write a different type of blog post. Because some of my favorite newsletters are lists of articles on topics of the day.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Here’s what I’m reading right now.

1. On Outages

While everyone is scrambling to figure out why part of the internet went down … wait is S3 is part of the internet, really? While I’m figuring out if it is a service of Amazon, or if Amazon is so big that Amazon *is* the internet now…

Let’s look at s3 architectural flaws in depth.

Meanwhile Gitlab had an outage too in which they *gasp* lost data. Seriously? An outage is one thing, losing data though. Hmmm…

And this article is brilliant on so many levels. No least because Matthew knows that “post truth” is a trending topic now, and uses it his title. So here we go, AWS Service status truth in a post truth world. Wow!

And meanwhile the Atlantic tries to track down where exactly are those Amazon datacenters?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. On Code

Project wise I’m fiddling around with a few fun things.

Take a look at Guy Geerling’s Ansible on a Mac playbooks. Nice!

And meanwhile a very nice deep dive on Amazon Lambda serverless best practices.

Brandur Leach explains how to build awesome APIs aka ones that are robust & idempotent

Meanwhile Frans Rosen explains how to 0wn slack. And no you don’t want this. ūüôā

Related: 5 surprising features in Amazon’s serverless Lambda offering

3. On Hiring & Talent

Are you a rock star dev or a digital nomad? Take a look at the 12 best international cities to live in for software devs.

And if you’re wondering who’s hiring? Well just about everyone!

Devs are you blogging? You should be.

Looking to learn or teach… check out codementor.

Also: why did dev & ops used to be separate job roles?

4. On Legacy Systems

I loved Drew Bell’s story of stumbling into home ownership, attempting to fix a doorbell, and falling down a familiar rabbit hole. With parallels to legacy software systems… aka any older then oh say five years?

Ian Bogost ruminates why nothing works anymore… and I don’t think an hour goes by where I don’t ask myself the same question!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

5. On Databases

If you grew up on the virtual world of the cloud, you may have never touched hardware besides your own laptop. Developing in this world may completely remove us from understanding those pesky underlying physical layers. Yes indeed folks containers do run in “virtual” machines, but those themselves are running on metal, somewhere down the stack.

With that let’s not forget that No, databases are not for containers… but a healthy reminder ain’t bad..

Meanwhile Larry’s mothership is sinking…(hint: Oracle) Does anybody really care? Now’s the time to revisit Mike Wilson’s classic The difference between god and Larry Ellison.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

How I use Terraform & Composer to automate wordpress on aws

iRobot1

How I setup wordpress to deploy automatically on aws

You want to make your wordpress site bulletproof? No server outage worries? Want to make it faster & more reliable. And also host on cheaper components?

I was after all these gains & also wanted to kick the tires on some of Amazon’s latest devops offerings. So I plotted a way forward to completely automate the deployment of my blog, hosted on wordpress.

Here’s how!

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

The article is divided into two parts…

Deploy a wordpress site on aws – decouple assets (part 1)

In this one I decouple the assets from the website. What do I mean by this? By moving the db to it’s own server or RDS of even simpler management, it means my server can be stopped & started or terminated at will, without losing all my content. Cool.

You’ll also need to decouple your assets. Those are all the files in the uploads directory. Amazon’s S3 offering is purpose built for this use case. It also comes with easy cloudfront integration for object caching, and lifecycle management to give your files backups over time. Cool !

Deploy a wordpress site on aws – automate (part 2)

The second part we move into all the automation pieces. We’ll use PHP’s Composer to manage dependencies. That’s fancy talk for fetching wordpress itself, and all of our plugins.

1. Isolate your config files

Create a directory & put your config files in it.

$ mkdir iheavy
$ cd iheavy
$ touch htaccess
$ touch httpd.conf
$ touch wp-config.php
$ touch a_simple_pingdom_test.php
$ touch composer.json
$ zip -r iheavy-config.zip *
$ aws s3 cp iheavy-config.zip s3://my-config-bucket/

In a future post we’re going to put all these files in version control. Amazon’s CodeCommit is feature compatible with Github, but integrated right into your account. Once you have your files there, you can use CodeDeploy to automatically place files on your server.

We chose to leave this step out, to simplify the server role you need, for your new EC2 webserver instance. In our case it only needs S3 permissions!

Also: When devops means resistance to change

2. Build your terraform script

Terraform is a lot like Vagrant. I wrote a Howto deploy on EC2 with Vagrant article a couple years ago.

The terraform configuration formalizes what you are asking of Amazon’s API. What size instance? Which AMI? What VPC should I launch in? Which role should my instance assume to get S3 access it needs? And lastly how do we make sure it gets the same Elastic IP each time it boots?

All the magic is inside the terraform config.

Here’s what I see:

levanter:~ sean$ cat iheavy.tf

resource "aws_iam_role" "web_iam_role" {
    name = "web_iam_role"
    assume_role_policy = <

And here's what it looks like when I ask terraform to build my infrastructure:

levanter:~ sean$ terraform apply
aws_iam_instance_profile.web_instance_profile: Refreshing state... (ID: web_instance_profile)
aws_iam_role.web_iam_role: Refreshing state... (ID: web_iam_role)
aws_s3_bucket.apps_bucket: Refreshing state... (ID: iheavy)
aws_iam_role_policy.web_iam_role_policy: Refreshing state... (ID: web_iam_role:web_iam_role_policy)
aws_instance.iheavy: Refreshing state... (ID: i-14e92e24)
aws_eip.bar: Refreshing state... (ID: eipalloc-78732a47)
aws_instance.iheavy: Creating...
  ami:                               "" => "ami-1a249873"
  availability_zone:                 "" => ""
  ebs_block_device.#:                "" => ""
  ephemeral_block_device.#:          "" => ""
  iam_instance_profile:              "" => "web_instance_profile"
  instance_state:                    "" => ""
  instance_type:                     "" => "t1.micro"
  key_name:                          "" => "iheavy"
  network_interface_id:              "" => ""
  placement_group:                   "" => ""
  private_dns:                       "" => ""
  private_ip:                        "" => ""
  public_dns:                        "" => ""
  public_ip:                         "" => ""
  root_block_device.#:               "" => ""
  security_groups.#:                 "" => ""
  source_dest_check:                 "" => "true"
  subnet_id:                         "" => "subnet-1f866434"
  tenancy:                           "" => ""
  user_data:                         "" => "ca8a661fffe09e4392b6813fbac68e62e9fd28b4"
  vpc_security_group_ids.#:          "" => "1"
  vpc_security_group_ids.2457389707: "" => "sg-46f0f223"
aws_instance.iheavy: Still creating... (10s elapsed)
aws_instance.iheavy: Still creating... (20s elapsed)
aws_instance.iheavy: Creation complete
aws_eip.bar: Modifying...
  instance: "" => "i-6af3345a"
aws_eip_association.eip_assoc: Creating...
  allocation_id:        "" => "eipalloc-78732a47"
  instance_id:          "" => "i-6af3345a"
  network_interface_id: "" => ""
  private_ip_address:   "" => ""
  public_ip:            "" => ""
aws_eip.bar: Modifications complete
aws_eip_association.eip_assoc: Creation complete

Apply complete! Resources: 2 added, 1 changed, 0 destroyed.

The state of your infrastructure has been saved to the path
below. This state is required to modify and destroy your
infrastructure, so keep it safe. To inspect the complete state
use the `terraform show` command.

State path: terraform.tfstate
levanter:~ sean$ 

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

3. Use Composer to automate wordpress install

There is a PHP package manager called composer. It manages dependencies and we depend on a few things. First WordPress itself, and second the various plugins we have installed.

The file is a JSON file. Pretty vanilla. Have a look:

{
    "name": "acme/brilliant-wordpress-site",
    "description": "My brilliant WordPress site",
    "repositories":[
        {
            "type":"composer",
            "url":"https://wpackagist.org"
        }
    ],
    "require": {
       "aws/aws-sdk-php":"*",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/medium":"1.4.0",
       "wpackagist-plugin/google-sitemap-generator":"3.2.9",
       "wpackagist-plugin/amp":"0.3.1",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/w3-total-cache":"0.9.3",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/wordpress-importer":"0.6.1",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/yet-another-related-posts-plugin":"4.0.7",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/better-wp-security":"5.3.7",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/disqus-comment-system":"2.74",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/amazon-s3-and-cloudfront":"1.1",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/amazon-web-services":"1.0",
	    "wpackagist-plugin/feedburner-plugin":"1.48",
       "wpackagist-theme/hueman":"*",
	    "php": ">=5.3",
	    "johnpbloch/wordpress": "4.6.1"
    },
    "autoload": {
        "psr-0": {
            "Acme": "src/"
        }
    }

}

Read: Is aws a patient that needs constant medication?

4. build your user-data script

This captures all the commands you run once the instance starts. Update packages, install your own, move & configure files. You name it!

#!/bin/sh

yum update -y
yum install emacs -y
yum install mysql -y
yum install php -y
yum install git -y
yum install aws-cli -y
yum install gd -y
yum install php-gd -y
yum install ImageMagick -y
yum install php-mysql -y


yum install -y httpd24 
service httpd start
chkconfig httpd on

# configure mysql password file
echo "[client]" >> /root/.my.cnf
echo "host=my-rds.ccccjjjjuuuu.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com" >> /root/.my.cnf
echo "user=root" >> /root/.my.cnf
echo "password=abc123" >> /root/.my.cnf


# install PHP composer
export COMPOSE_HOME=/root
echo "installing composer..."
php -r "copy('https://getcomposer.org/installer', 'composer-setup.php');"
php -r "if (hash_file('SHA384', 'composer-setup.php') === 'e115a8dc7871f15d853148a7fbac7da27d6c0030b848d9b3dc09e2a0388afed865e6a3d6b3c0fad45c48e2b5fc1196ae') { echo 'Installer verified'; } else { echo 'Installer corrupt'; unlink('composer-setup.php'); } echo PHP_EOL;"
php composer-setup.php
php -r "unlink('composer-setup.php');"
mv composer.phar /usr/local/bin/composer


# fetch config files from private S3 folder
aws s3 cp s3://iheavy-config/iheavy_files.zip .

# unzip files
unzip iheavy_files.zip 

# use composer to get wordpress & plugins
composer update

# move wordpress software
mv wordpress/* /var/www/html/

# move plugins
mv wp-content/plugins/* /var/www/html/wp-content/plugins/

# move pingdom test
mv a_simple_pingdom_test.php /var/www/html

# move htaccess
mv htaccess /var/www/html/.htaccess

# move httpd.conf
mv iheavy_httpd.conf /etc/httpd/conf.d

# move our wp-config into place
mv wp-config.php /var/www/html

# restart apache
service httpd restart

# allow apache to create uploads & any files inside wp-content
chown apache /var/www/html/wp-content

You can monitor things as they're being installed. Use ssh to reach your new instance. Then as root:

$ tail -f /var/log/cloud-init.log

Related: Does Amazon eat it's own dogfood?

5. Time to test

Visit the domain name you specified inside your /etc/httpd/conf.d/mysite.conf

You have full automation now. Don't believe me? Go ahead & TERMINATE the instance in your aws console. Now drop back to your terminal and do:

$ terraform apply

Terraform will figure out that the resources that *should* be there are missing, and go ahead and build them for you. AGAIN. Fully automated style!

Don't forget your analytics beacon code

Hopefully you remember how your analytics is configured. The beacon code makes an API call everytime a page is loaded. This tells google analytics or other monitoring systems what your users are doing, and how much time they're spending & where.

This typically goes in the header.php file. We'll leave it as an exercise to automate this piece yourself!

Also: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don't work with recruiters

Deploy wordpress on aws by first decoupling assets

too much inventory

You want to make your wordpress site bulletproof? No server outage worries? Want to make it faster & more reliable. And also host on cheaper components?

I was after all these gains & also wanted to kick the tires on some of Amazon’s latest devops offerings. So I plotted a way forward to completely automate the deployment of my blog, hosted on wordpress.

Here’s how!

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

The article is divided into two parts…

Deploy a wordpress site on aws – decouple assets (part 1)

In this one I decouple the assets from the website. What do I mean by this? By moving the db to it’s own server or RDS of even simpler management, it means my server can be stopped & started or terminated at will, without losing all my content. Cool.

You’ll also need to decouple your assets. Those are all the files in the uploads directory. Amazon’s S3 offering is purpose built for this use case. It also comes with easy cloudfront integration for object caching, and lifecycle management to give your files backups over time. Cool !

Terraform a wordpress site on aws – automate deploy (part 2)

The second part we move into all the automation pieces. We’ll use PHP’s Composer to manage dependencies. That’s fancy talk for fetching wordpress itself, and all of our plugins.

1. get your content into S3

How to do it?

A. move your content

$ cd html/wp-content/
$ aws s3 cp uploads s3://iheavy/wp-content/

Don’t have the aws command line tools installed?

$ yum install aws-cli -y
$ aws configure

B. Edit your .htaccess file with these lines:

These above steps handle all *existing* content. However you also want new content to go to S3. For that wordpress needs to understand how to put files there. Luckily there’s a plugin to help!


RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^wp-content/uploads/(.*)$ http://s3.amazonaws.com/your-bucket/wp-content/uploads/$1 [P]

C. Fetch WP Offload S3 Lite

You’ll see the plugin below in our composer.json file as “amazon-s3-and-cloudfront”

Theoretically you need to specify your aws credentials inside the wp-config.php. However this is insecure. You don’t ever want stuff like that in S3 or any code repository. What to do?

The best way is to use AWS ROLES for your instance. These give the whole instance access to API calls without credentials. Cool! Read more about AWS roles for instances.

Related: Is there a devops talent gap?

2. Move to your database to RDS

You may also use a roll-your-own MySQL instance. The point here is to make it a different EC2 instance. That way you can kill & rebuild the webserver at will. This offers us some cool advantages.

A. Create an RDS instance in a private subnet.

o Be sure it has no access to the outside world.
o note the root user, password
o note the endpoint or hostname

I recommend changing the password from your old instance. That way you can’t accidentally login to your old db. Well it’s still possible, but it’s one step harder.

B. mysqldump your current wp db from another server

$ cd /tmp
$ mysqldump –opts wp_database > wp_database.mysql

C. copy that dump to an instance in the same VPC & subnet as the rds instance

$ scp -i .ssh/mykey.pem ec2-user@oldbox.com:/tmp/wp_database.mysql /tmp/

D. import the data into your new db

$ cd /tmp
$ echo “create database wp_database” | mysql
$ mysql < wp_database.mysql E. Edit your wp-config.php

define(‘DB_PASSWORD’, ‘abc123’);
define(‘DB_HOST’, ‘my-rds.ccccjjjjuuuu.us-east-1.rds.amazonaws.com’);

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Review: Host Your Web Site In The Cloud, Amazon Web Services Made Easy

Jeff Barr’s book on AWS is a very readable howto and a quick way to get started with EC2, S3, CloudFront, CloudWatch and SimpleDB. ¬†It is short on theory, but long on all the details of really getting your hands dirty. ¬†Learn how to:

  • get started using the APIs to spinup servers
  • create a load balancer
  • add and remove application servers
  • build custom AMIs
  • create EBS volumes, attach them to your instances & format them
  • snapshot EBS volumes
  • use RAID with EBS
  • setup CloudWatch to monitor your instances
  • setup triggers with CloudWatch to enable AutoScaling

I would have liked to see examples in Chef rather than PHP, but hey you can’t have everything!

Review: Host Your Web Site In The Cloud by Jeff Barr

Introduction to EC2 Cloud Deployments

Cloud Computing holds a lot of promise, but there are also a lot of speed bumps in the road along the way.

In this six part series we’re going to cover a lot of ground. ¬†We don’t intend this series to be an overly technical nuts and bolts howto. ¬†Rather we will discuss high level issues and answer questions that come up for CTOs, business managers, and startup CEOs.

Some of the tantalizing issues we’ll address include:

  • How do I make sure my application is built for the cloud with scalability baked into the architecture?
  • I know disk performance is crucial for my database tier. ¬†How do I get the best disk performance with Amazon Web Services & EC2?
  • How do I keep my AWS passwords, keys & certificates secure?
  • Should I be doing offsite backups as well, or are snapshots enough?
  • Cloud providers such as Amazon seem to have poor SLAs (service level agreements). ¬†How do I mitigate this using availability zones & regions?
  • Cloud hosting environments like Amazons provide no perimeter security. ¬†How do I use security groups to ensure my setup is robust and bulletproof?
  • Cloud deployments change the entire procurement process, handing a lot of control over to the web operations team. ¬†How do I ensure that finance and ops are working together, and a ceiling budget is set and implemented?
  • Reliability of Amazon EC2 servers is much lower than traditional hosted servers. ¬†Failure is inevitable. ¬†How do we use this fact to our advantage, forcing discipline in the deployment and disaster recovery processes? ¬†How do I make sure my processes are scripted & firedrill tested?
  • Snapshot backups and other data stored in S3 are somewhat less secure than I’d like. ¬†Should I use encryption to protect this data? ¬†When and where should I use encrypted filesystems to protect my more sensitive data?
  • How can I best use availability zones and regions to geographically disperse my data and increase availability?

As we publish each of the individual articles in this series we’ll link them to the titles below. ¬†So check back soon!

  • Building Highly Scalable Web Applications for the Cloud
  • Managing Security in Amazon Web Services
  • MySQL Databases in the Cloud – Best Practices
  • Backup and Recovery in the Cloud – A Checklist
  • Cloud Deployments – Disciplined Infrastructure
  • Cloud Computing Use Cases