Tag Archives: innovation

Is there a devops talent gap?

jenkins_docker

New programming languages & services are being invented at a staggering pace. Hosting is changing, networking is changing, race to market is quickening.

But what does all of this mean to the search for talent? Who understands all these components? Who is an expert in any one?

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. That new car smell

We all remember that time. You know when you drove out of the dealership with your brand new wheels. Driving down the road, you feel on top of the world. You start dreaming of all the fun times you’ll have in your new car. For days and weeks afterward you walk out to your car, open the door & sit inside. It all feels special. You kind of hang out there for a few minutes enjoying the smell before you drive off. Right?

Let’s be vigilant to remember the same thing happens, or rather is happeing in technology all the time. As we automate our infrastructures with Ansible, Puppet & Chef, deploy continuous integration with Jenkins, Travis or Codeship, we should give pause. Each of these tools has it’s own syntax, it’s own bugs, it’s own community, it’s own speed of development & change, it’s own life.

Also: Does a four letter word divide dev & ops?

2. A lot of rushing

Google tells me the synonyms of agile are, nimble, lithe, supple & acrobatic. So in a fast moving world it’s no wonder agile is so big. Anything that allows us to respond to customers quicker & evolve our product faster is a good thing. Yes it is.

Over the years I’ve worked with a lot of clients & customers. Some right out of the gates are in a hurry. There is a sense of urgency even from the initial meeting. Although not in every case, sometimes these are the sign of the perpetually late. They end up throwing money around, throwing technology around, and all in a desperate attempt to plug a leaking ship.

In our race to automate & remain agile & nimble, we should also consider the future. Lets attempt to find a balance & consider future implications of technology decisions & choices.

Read: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Hosting, what’s that?

For many of the startups I work with today, they’ve never deployed on anything but Amazon. There was no rack of computers in a closet & a T1 line, circa 1997. There was no rackspace hosted servers or a colo in New Jersey circa 2005. Right from the beginning it was all on-demand computing.

This shift has surely brought a lot of benefit. But no one can argue it isn’t still very new. And with newness there is a learning curve. And bugs & surprises.

Related: Does a devop need to practice the art of resistance?

4. More complexity in troubleshooting

The wild ride really begins when you’re troubleshooting performance problems. Running your database on RDS you say? How the heck do I get to the terminal and run “top”? Can I do an iostat?

And what does iostat output really mean in multi-tenant Amazon, where your disk is an EBS volume across an unknown & unfriendly network. Who knows why it just slowed to a crawl, then sped up dramatically a few minutes later.

Even fetching the relevant logfile can be complicated. For all the problems the cloud eliminates, it sure introduces a few of it’s own. And who is the expert, and how to find them?

Read this: When fat fingers take down your database

5. More tech, fewer experts

I asked the question a few weeks back Do todays startups require assembly of a lot of parts that no one really understands?.

I’ve taken to browsing the stacks at the lovely StackShare site lately. There you can see what some of the top startups are using for their technology stacks. Docker, Yammer, Yelp, Stripe, Vine, Spotify & Stack Overflow are all there today.

There are new message queues like NSQ & programming languages like Markdown, Coffeescript & Clojure. Even Java. Are people still building web apps in Java. No please no!

While it’s wonderful to see such an explosion of innovation, I look at this from an operations perspective. In five years, when the first & second wave of developers at your startup have left, picture yourself trying to find talent in a long since out-of-fashion language like Dart or Swift. What’s more how do you untangle the mess you’ve now built?

Check this: Is the SQL database dead?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

5 Things Frans Johansson says about innovation

medici affect johansson

You may not have heard of Medici before, but you’ve probably heard of the renaissance. The medici family hosted the round tables, the meetups, the social gatherings & mixers. They brought diverse artisans engineers & thinkers together, and the world hasn’t been the same since!

b>Join 16,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

In the Medici Effect, Frans dissects what this famous family did. His case studies include the likes of Richard Branson, Deepak Chopra, Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, Orit Gadiesh, Marcus Samuelsson, George Soros & our own favorite Linus Torvalds,

What he discovered really surprised me.

1. Swim at the intersection

Hanging out with folks in your field is great. Whether you’re a physician, financial analyst, Ruby programmer, or artist. But it won’t expose us to enough new ideas. To get that, you need to hang out with those in other disciplines. Learn a language, take dance classes, try your hand at a new sport, or attend meetups of wedding planners or DJs. Whatever it takes to get out of your comfort zone is what will put you at the intersection.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

2. You need quantity to get quality

This was a very surprising finding of their research. One might think that greats like Albert Einstein were geniuses from the start. But it turns out one consistent factor between all these folks is the quantity of their attempts. They came up with many many ideas, and chased as many as they could. Of course they are only remembered for their successes, but this hides the underlying mathematics. It’s a numbers game in almost all of these cases.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

3. Peel all the potatoes and cook them together

Peel one potato and cook it. Then peel another and cook it. Doesn’t sound like a recipe for efficiently preparing dinner does it? Turns out it’s also not great for innovating. Peel & prepare many ideas at once, and try to execute them in parallel if you can. That’s what these greats have done.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

4. Be ok with more failures

This is a tricky one. But Johansson puts in perspective with this key quote:

”Inaction is far worse than failure.”

Viewed that way, our caution about diving into a new idea seems more limiting. True it costs money, time & resources to pursue new ideas, ventures & startups. So be sure to reserve resources. That’s right spend that money & time carefully lest you run out before hitting on the big one.

He also says to be suspicious of low failure rates. In yourself or those you’re evaluating. This probably indicates you’re not risking enough, or trying new things constantly.

Read this: Why Oracle Won’t Kill MySQL

5. break out of your network

Your network is powerful to pursue your career, or following existing well traveled paths. But they can be an obstacle when forging new paths, which is what innovation is all about.

So break away from your networks. One way you can do this is by building a new one. But be sure to surround yourself with diverse cultures, upbringing, backgrounds & expertise.

Also: RDS or MySQL 10 Use Cases

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Review – Who Moved My Cheese

whomovedmycheese

Spencer Johnson is a great writer.  His business book classic was a real page turner.  He takes a page from the REWORK book and that’s a good thing.

Who Moved My Cheese is a story about mice living in a maze happy and content that they have an unlimited supply of cheese.  Then one day the cheese runs out.  Continue reading Review – Who Moved My Cheese