Tag Archives: infrastructure automation

The New Commodity Hardware Craze aka Cloud Computing

Does anyone remember 15 years ago when the dot-com boom was just starting?  A lot of companies were running on Sun.  Sun was the best hardware you could buy for the price.  It was reliable and a lot of engineers had experience with the operating system, SunOS a flavor of Unix.

Yet suddenly companies were switching to cheap crappy hardware.  The stuff failed more often, had lower quality control, and cheaper and slower buses.  Despite all of that, cutting edge firms and startups were moving to commodity hardware in droves.  Why was it so? Continue reading The New Commodity Hardware Craze aka Cloud Computing

Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

In search of a good book on Chef itself, I picked up this new title on O’Reilly.  It’s one of their new format books, small in size, only 75 pages.

There was some very good material in this book.  Mr. Nelson-Smith’s writing style is good, readable, and informative.  The discussion of risks of infrastructure as code was instructive.  With the advent of APIs to build out virtual data centers, the idea of automating every aspect of systems administration, and building infrastructure itself as code is a new one.  So an honest discussion of the risks of such an approach is bold and much needed.  I also liked the introduction to Chef itself, and the discussion of installation.

Chef isn’t really the main focus of this book, unfortunately.  The book spends a lot of time introducing us to Agile Development, and specifically test driven development.  While these are lofty goals, and the first time I’ve seen treatment of the topic in relation to provisioning cloud infrastructure, I did feel too much time was spent on that.  Continue reading Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

Infrastructure Provisioning – What is it and why is it important?

In the old days…

You would have a closet in your startup company with a rack of computers.  Provisioning involved:

  1. Deciding on your architectural direction, what, where & how
  2. Ordering the new hardware
  3. Waiting weeks for the packages to arrive
  4. Setup the hardware, wire things together, power up
  5. Discover some component is missing, or failed and order replacement
  6. Wait longer…
  7. Finally get all the pieces setup
  8. Configure software components and go

Along came some industrious folks who realized power and data to your physical location wasn’t reliable.  So datacenters sprang up.  With data centers, most of the above steps didn’t change except between steps 3 & 4 you would send your engineers out to the datacenter location.  Trips back and forth ate up time and energy.

Then along came managed hosting.  Managed hosting saved companies a lot of headache, wasted man hours, and other resources.  They allowed your company to do more of what it does well, run the business, and less on managing hardware and infrastructure.  Provisioning now became:

  1. Decide on architecture direction
  2. Call hosting provider and talk to sales person
  3. Wait a day or two
  4. Setup & configure software components and go

Obviously this new state of affairs improved infrastructure provisioning dramatically.  It simplified the process and sped it up as well.  What’s more a managed hosting provider could keep spare parts and standard components on hand in much greater volume than a small firm.  That’s a big plus.  This evolution continued because it was a win-win for everyone.  The only downside was when engineers made mistakes, and finger pointing began.  But despite all of that, a managed hosting provider which does only that, can do it better, and more reliably than you can yourself.

So where are we in present day?  We are all either doing, or looking out cloud provisioning of infrastructure.  What’s cloud provisioning?  It is a complete paradigm shift, but along the same trajectory as what we’ve described above.  Now you removed all the waiting.  No waiting for sales team, or the ordering process.  That’s automatic.  No waiting for engineers to setup the servers, they’re already setup.  They are allocated by your software and scripts.  Even the setup and configuration of software components, Operating System and services to run on that server – all automatic.

This is such a dramatic shift, that we are still feeling the affects of it.  Traditional operations teams have little experience with this arrangement, and perhaps little trust in virtual servers.  Business units are also not used to handing the trigger to infrastructure spending over to ops teams or to scripts and software.

However the huge economic pressures continue to push firms to this new model, as well as new operational flexibility.  Gartner predicts this trend will only continue. The advantages of cloud infrastructure provisioning include:

  1. Metered payment – no huge outlay of cash for new infrastructure
  2. Infrastructure as a service – scripted components automate & reduced manual processes
  3. Devops – Manage infrastructure like code with version control and reproduceability
  4. Take unused capacity offline easily & save on those costs
  5. Disaster Recovery is free – reuse scripts to build standard components
  6. Easily meet seasonal traffic requirements – spinup additional servers instantly

On Quora Sean Hull asks – What is infrastructure provisioning and why is it important?