Tag Archives: freelance

How do we measure devotion?


I was talking recently over email with a hiring manager. Jamie (not his real name) wanted to hire me, but was set against consulting. While that by itself is understandable, he seemed to equate it with devotion. This troubled me. Here’s the quote below.

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While I am sure your skills are excellent, I guess what I am trying to gauge is your desire to quit consulting and join us full time.  I am looking for you to share my vision of changing publishing through data.   Let me be clear: I am not looking for a contractor.  Acme is a fabulous company and I need a person devoted to Acme and to our data assets.

1. Devotion on vacation

Here’s my response. All names have been changed.

I understand Jamie.

I hear you about devotion, I think it’s very important too.  In 2010, I was working at MGC.  After 3 months, they hired a large remote DBA firm out of Canada, to manage the database systems & my contract concluded.  

A few weeks later and a few hours before a plane flight,  I got a harried call.  Can you help us? Database replication is broken & our site is offline.   I jumped on skype to chat with the team, even as I was packing my bags.  I went to the airport, and got on WIFI again.  In-flight on my way to California I remained online to help repair the systems & bring everything back.  It took a few more days and half of my vacation to get things working again, but I wanted to help.

My boss at MGC kept me on for 1 ½ year after that.  He felt I was devoted & gave them the very best service.  

If you change your mind, or would like to discuss further, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Also: What happens when clients don’t pay?

2. Devotion to a manager

I had another experience years back with company Media Inc. Working under a very good CTO, I was surrounded by a team who was also very loyal to him. After about a year, he decided to leave. He had gotten a very enticing offer from another firm. Although he made a great effort to leave the ship in good condition, the crew felt the ship rocking a bit. A temporary CTO was brought on who had a very different style.

As the ship continued to rock at sea, finally a new CTO was found. He however was not popular at all. He had a swagger & tended to throw his weight around, irritating the team, and making them fear they might be thrown from the ship. Slowly they began to leave. After three months, six out of eight on the team had left. There was one old-school Oracle guy still left, and me.

Although he certainly had a different style than the previous boss, it didn’t bother me much. I told him I’d stay as long as he needed me. I was also working remote so I didn’t deal with some of the day-to-day politics.

My devotion was to the business, databases & systems. I accomplished this by being devoted to my own business.

Related: Why I ask customers for a deposit?

3. Devotion to vesting

I worked at another firm about three years ago. Let’s call them Growing Fast Inc. While the firm itself was gaining ground & getting customers like Nike & Wallmart, it still had an engineering team of only ten. You could say it was boxing way above it’s weight.

While it tried to grow, it hired an outside CTO to help. His style was primarily management facing, while the teams problems were based in technology. With tons of technical debt & a lack of real leadership, the engineering team was floundering. Lots of infighting was making things worse.

Suddenly a key team member decided to quit. The following week another, and after that two more. All told four left. When you consider how small the team was, and further that the remaining members were basically founders a different picture emerges. Four out of six (non-founders) had left in two weeks, roughly 66% of the engineering team. The only other guy who stayed had his visa sponsored by Growing Fast Inc.

The founders who stayed were all vested. Everyone else quit because of mismanagement.

Read: 5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

4. Devotion to code & data

In an industry as competitive as software & technology, it’s often devotion to building things that wins the day. Using the latest & greatest languages, databases & tech stack can carry a lot of weight.

Managing technical debt can make a difference too. Developers don’t want to be asked to constantly walk a minefield of other developers mistakes. A minefield needs to be cleaned up, for the business to flourish.

Also: 5 things I learned about trust & advising clients?

5. Devotion through & through

Running a startup isn’t easy. Many fail after 3 or 5 years. I’m devoted to business.  I’ve been an entrepreneur for 20 years, and built it into a success.  

The year after 9/11 & again after 2008 were the most difficult periods to tough it out.  It’s been hard fought & I wouldn’t shutter the doors of my own business easily.  It affords me the opportunity to attend AWS popup loft hearing lectures, going to conferences & meetups & blogging about technology topics, & pivoting with the technological winds change.  

I’ve found all of this makes me extremely valuable to firms looking for expertise.  I have independence & perspective that’s hard to find.  I’m also there for firms that have been looking to fill a role, and need help sooner rather than later.

Also: A CTO must never do this

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Best of Scalable Startups Consulting Content


I’ve been blogging very regularly for the past four years. In fact the blog itself has been around for over ten years! Time flies!

In that time I’ve posted a lot of evergreen content, some that google finds, and some that could be dusted off.

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So here’s a peak into the archives, of some of the very best of scalable startups. Enjoy!

1. I blog about consulting

When you spend years doing consulting, professional services & freelance work, you learn all sorts of things. You stumble, you find yourself in unfamiliar territory, you learn. All that makes great fodder for blogging about business, and war stories. So here’s some of my best writing on the topic.

I had one experience where a prospect was still on the fence. That may be positive spin, as the title was
When prospects mislead. It turned out to be more a case of free consulting advice than anything else.

At networking events, I meet other freelancers, and consultants. There’s always debate about this topic, so I wrote
Why i ask clients for a deposit. There are reasons for both client and consultant, and I touch on the lessons i’ve learned.

It might seem strange that I’d write a post titled
Why I can’t raise the bar at every firm but there are prospects that aren’t the right fit for me. Here are some of the pre-qualifying questions on both sides of the fence.

Sad to say, but every client & consultant relationship isn’t a love story. So I wrote
When a client takes a swing at you about one such relationship and how I handled it.

I ask the question,
Does weekly billing increase time pressure? I think it does change the dynamic in some positive ways and I discuss those.

You’re ready to hire a consultant. What’s next? As it turns out, professional services is more a peer relationship with CEO’s, CTO’s & managers. So the typical, “send me your resume” and so forth may not be best. Here’s
5 conversational ways to evaluate consultants that provide an alternate approach to finding the best services.

One of the hardest things for engineers can be sales. Along the way to consulting success, I wrote
Can an engineer learn to love sales? Eventually it’s a skill that you have to improve at, if you want to stay in business for yourself.

Ever consulting engagement is not about your own triumphs. The conclusion isn’t always the wonderful things you’ve done for the firm. I wrote
When you have to take the fall after an engagement where it wasn’t a celebration at the end.

Sometimes in consulting, there’s what you’re hired to do on paper, and then what the real challenges are.
When you’re hired to solve a people problem addresses one such engagement, and how I handled it.

Believe it or not folks, sometimes there is a disconnect between management, and accounts payable. So I wrote
When clients don’t pay as a lesson & how I handled it.

Consulting is decidedly not the career path for everyone.
Why do people leave consulting
is my attempt to explain why some I’ve seen have left the business.

Everybody doesn’t love consultants. So
Do you heed John Greathouse – beware the consultant? That’s a question I attempted to answer.

Are you talking to Oracle or other technology sales teams about what solutions are right for your business?
Beware a wolf in sheeps clothing as it can be surprisingly dangerous field.

Another war story I wrote,
When apples & oranges bring down your business. Here a misunderstanding of semantics, means manager & dba make a severe misjudgement, and both pay the price.

After twenty years in the business, here are the
Top 3 questions I get from clients.

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Do we need another book on communicating?


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I had to ask the question. There are so many books on communicating & presenting affectively, it begs the question, what can this book do that others haven’t?

While it’s a fair question, I don’t necessarily think it stands with peers. That said it’s a new book, with a new tone, preaching many of the best advice and doing it with a flair. If you’ve read a ton of communication books, you may not find something new, but if the topic is one you’re just digging into, Pietrucha is a great place to start.

1. Jobs vs Gates – inspired presentations

If you’ve ever seen these two companies CEO’s do new product demos, you’ll immediately get it. You don’t have to be an apple fanboy to appreciate how Jobs presents without buzzwords, and cuts to the heart of our hearts.

That means don’t get mired in jargon, speak to our passions, and be your own ambassador.

Also: Do managers underestimate operational costs?

2. Lead with a story & a question

In a recent discussion with a prospect I was asked about one experience that stood out over the years of consulting.

One popped into my head of a dot-com startup in the late 90’s. The company was trying to close an acquisition deal, but the web application was sick & feverish. My first few days involved conversations with lead engineers, DBA & operations team members. As I turn over more stones, I found a key component, the database, misconfigured. I sifted through configurations, and found the setup lacking. The server was using only 5% of memory. Some of the settings were even still at their default. Changing the right ones allowed the machine to flex it’s muscles like a marathon runner taken off a starvation diet. Things improved very quickly, and the site returned to a snappy responsive self.

The CEO beamed with approval, and just a few weeks later the firm was purchased for over 80 million dollars. Not bad work if you can get it. 🙂

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

3. Drop the vernacular & speak broadly

After recently doing some writing for muckrack on how to reach pitch journalists and then at Infoworld getting started with Amazon EC2. I’ve learned a ton. Having a professional editor explain what they want really puts things in perspective.

Editors will start by talking about their audience. If you’re a blogger, do you know who your audience is, and what they really get from your site? There may be many answers. Once you get your audience, how can you speak to all of them? In my case, I have readers who are programmers & devops, then I have CEO’s & VCs. But it doesn’t stop there. What about recruiters, and hiring managers? How about random internet searchers, and students?

All of these folks can get something from my site, and using broad language allows everyone to be within reach. Don’t sacrifice depth, but use language and stories to make your point.

Check this: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

4. Analogies that resonate

I attend a lot of mini conferences, meetups, drinkups & social events in nyc. I find it’s one of the keys to success in consulting.

In an endless sea of conversations, you will find yourself talking about what your day-to-day business is all about. In my early years in nyc, these conversations would consist of technically correct descriptions, followed by glazed eyes, and a quick change of subject. After this happens often enough you start to wonder, how can I share such a technical description to a broader audience?

Truth is it’s only technical because you know so much about it. If I stand back I might say I’m “a sort of specialized surgeon for the internet”, or “a traffic cop of sorts, for the information highway we all share”, or better yet “a plumber, that you call when your pipes are backed up and your customers are screaming”.

Whichever analogy I use, I see eyes light up, and a look of understanding. “Oh I can see how that would be an important specialization”. Indeed.

The right analogy makes all the difference!

Related: Are startup CEO’s hiding their scalability problems?

5. Put your words on the chopping block

If you haven’t already done so, start chopping. Sentences & paragraphs all benefit from shortening & edit. Distill your big ideas in summary and let the story lend the detail. Your audience will pay closer attention, and see the big picture you are trying to share.

The guys at 37 signals do this eloquently in RE:Work .

Read this: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

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5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

Startups and more mature businesses alike, and those large and small, at some point will need to hire a consultant or two. Want to get the best bang for your buck? Ask some tough questions!

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1. Make sure they’re not going to quit

I’ve heard so many crash and burn stories over the years, it makes my head spin.

One client had hired a consultant who was supposed to be the best in NYC. After only a few weeks of working with the client, he explained that they were “doing it all wrong”. Furthermore he had a travel schedule to meet, with speaking engagements in South America.

So he basically dropped them! As the client retold this story to me, I wonder if they could hear my head shaking, I was stunned. Who would turn away from a customer in pain? And furthermore turn away from one who could clearly use the expertise of someone who had seen a lot before!?

Keep in mind the reasons why people leave consulting.

2. Be sure they have some war stories to tell

Any consultant who’s been in business for a while, surely has some good war stories to tell. Talk about those, and find out the battles they’ve been in.

I can tell a few myself. In one case I was only 12 hours from leaving for summer vacation when a long time colleague and former client called me. They were in a serious emergency. The big boys, the remote DBAs that many in the industry use, had broken their database. Replication was misconfigured, and they were running blind. I ended up on a SKYPE call fixing the database and troubleshooting problems on Virgin’s inflight wifi. You don’t forget that kind of firefighting.

Be sure they won’t quit, ask about war stories, test for some push back and be sure they empathize with your business pain. But more importantly ask them to tell their own business story. You’ll learn a lot.

For another client, back in the dot-com days, their application was stalling completely. Customers were leaving, and so was an 80 million dollar buyout deal. Nothing a few Oracle parameters couldn’t fix!.

And there are always a few tales of woe between sales teams, and the engineers that then must deploy solutions in the real world. Beware the sales wolf in sheeps clothing and do your homework aka due diligence on technical solutions.

3. Ensure they can provide resistance & push back

Good consultants have to walk a tightrope all the time. On the one hand they are tasked with making their clients happy. At the end of the day, improving their position, business bottom line, yes these are crucial. Sure that means saying yes, that means trying to be a problem solver as much as possible.

But always saying yes, avoids hard truths that you have to share. I had one client whose primary Oracle dba went on vacation. Before he left we reviewed systems. Multi-master replication in Oracle is brittle by nature. We both agreed. And I agreed not to change the configurations lest it break other things down the line. Not one week into his vacation a mandate comes back from on high, this change absolutely has to happen now. There are millions of dollars at stake!

Applying strong resistance is necessary to avoid breaking something even bigger. And it was not easy to stand strong in the face of such pressure. But I assured the team that such changes would mean even bigger problems for the company.

4. Find out if they empathize with your pain

In one of the biggest ironic twists, consultants should understand the pain of building a business. Because they themselves have experienced when clients don’t pay so they understand cash flow problems themselves. That is what every small business struggles with, and most startups too!

5. Ask them how they built their business

For me, one of the least appreciated things about independent consulting is, that in the most important ways, it is about running a small business. So someone who has built and kept running a freelance or consulting business knows how to make hard decisions, and keep their eyes on the ball.

A consultant needs to know how to get business first and foremost. But then how to manage engagements carefully. Once you’ve got those two down, keep building your business incrementally.

Someone who has successfully run a real business for years can share the story of what they’ve done. What has worked, what hasn’t worked, how they have pivoted when necessary, how they have failed fast, and moved through it.

They can tell you how they stay cash flow positive, can deliver on time, can be likeable and communicate with teams, and really understand every side of a business.

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Hacking Job Search – Three Meaty Ideas

Also find the author on twitter @hullsean.

Demand for talented engineers has never been higher. It is in fact the dirty little secret of the startup industry, that there are simply not enough qualified folks to fill the positions.

What this means for you is that you have a lot of options. What it means for a hiring manager is that you will have to work even harder to find the right candidate. Just going to a recruiter isn’t enough. Use your network, go to meetups, follow Gary’s Guide daily.

Also check out our Mythical MySQL DBA piece where we talk about the shortage of DBAs and operations folks.

Further if you’ve dabbled in freelance or independent consulting, I wrote an interesting an in depth look at Why do people leave consulting. Understanding this can help avoid it in your own career, or avoid your resources leaving for better shores.

Find us on twitter @hullsean and linkedin where we share content and ideas everyday!

1. Build your reputation

As they say, your reputation precedes you. So start building it now. Fulltime or freelance, you want to be known.

Speaking, yes you can do it. Start with some small meetups, volunteer to speak on a topic. A ten person room is easier than 30, 50 or 100. Once you have a couple under your belt, fill out a CFP for Velocity, OSCon or some software developers conference. There are many.

Blog – if you’re not already doing so you should. Start with once a week. Comment on industry topics, controversial ideas, or engineering know-how. Prospects can look at this and learn a lot more than from a business card.

Write a book, yes you can. It may sound impossible, but the truth is that publishers are always looking for technical writers. Pick a topic near and dear to you. It’ll also give you endless material for your blog.

Go to meetups, you really need to be getting out there and networking. Get some Moo Business Cards and start working on your elevator pitch!

Social media – being active here helps your blog, and helps people find you. Twitter is a great place to do this. Interact with colleagues and startup founders, VCs and more. If you’re a hiring manager or CTO, you may find great programmers and devops this way.

We also wrote a more in-depth article Consulting and Freelance 101. It’s a three part guide with a lot of useful nugets.

Also take a look at our MySQL DBA Interview Guide which is as helpful to devops and DBAs as it is to managers hiring them!

Above all else, build your network & your reputation. It will put you in front of more people as a person, not a commodity or a resume in a pile of hundreds.

2. Qualify prospects

You definitely don’t want to take the first offer you get, and managers don’t want to hire the first candidate that comes along. You want two or three to choose from. Best way to do this is to have options.

If you’re a candidate, network or work through your colleagues. When you do get a lead, be sure you’re speaking to an economic buyer. If you’re not you’ll need to try to find that person who actually signs the checks. They are the ones who ultimately make the decision, so you want to sell yourself to them.

Get a Deposit – I know I know, if it’s your first freelance job, you don’t want to scare them off. Or maybe you do? The only prospects that would be scared off by this are ones who may not pay down the line. Dragging their feet with a deposit can also mean bureaucratic red tap, so be patient too.

Sara Horowitz has an excellent book Freelancers bible, we recommend you grab a copy right now!

Commodity You Are Not so don’t sell yourself as one. What do I mean? You are not an interchangeable part. You have special skills, you have personality, you have things that you’re particularly good at. These traits are what you need to focus on. The dime-a-dozen skills should sit more in the background.

You’ll also need to price and package your services. We talked about this in-depth in Consulting Essentials – Getting the Business.

We also think there is a reason Why Generalists are better at scaling the web.

3. Play the numbers game

For hiring managers this doesn’t mean working through recruiters that might be bringing subpar talent, it means networking through industry events, meetups, startup pitch and venture capital events. There are a few every single day in NYC and there’s no reason not to go to some of them.

For candidates, be eyeing a few different companies, and following up on more than one prospect. You should really think of this process as an integral and enjoyable part of your career, not a temporary in between stage. Networking doesn’t happen overnight, but from a regular process of meeting and engaging with colleagues over years and years in an industry.

At the end of the day hiring is a numbers game so you should play it as such. Keep searching, and always be watching the horizon.

Read this far? Grab our Scalable Startups for more tips and special content.

Going Solo for Fun or Profit?

Sara Horowitz has serious chops. Independent herself, she started Freelancer’s Union way back in 1995. Back then it was tougher as a freelancer. Through her great efforts, we’ve all benefited.

So when I saw she’d published a guide called “Freelancer’s Bible”, I was quick to grab a copy. And the book doesn’t disappoint. I wish this book had existed when I got my start way back when I first moved to NYC in 1996.

A budding freelancer

As a budding freelancer, you’ve got a ton of new skills to pickup, where to start? Flip to Part 1 and you’ll get a quick hitchhikers guide, with advice on setting up your office and organizing your time, to pitching to prospects, networking, and building a portfolio of different types of clients to keep your workflow steady. You also learn how to package your services, and the myriad ways to set fees from hourly, to project based and day rates to packages.

[quote]Network & market yourself, package & price services, communicate well and manage timelines, deliver, bill and finally get paid. Each step is outlined here in easy to read bullets, and helpful “Ask Sara” sections. Easy layout, and a pleasure to read.[/quote]

As I was reading these early chapters, I thought it would be nice to have a chapter on social media. Turns out I spoke too soon, as I flip through the pages, chapter 9 is all about marketing and social media, online tools to build your reputation and influence. Also I like that she appeals to the practical approach. For example Sara emphases that you let go of strategy, and experiment with different options, and methods. This is exactly what I’ve done over the years, and it’s the best way to find out what works for your personal style, as well as your industry. Trial and error!

I’ve written a guide on this topic myself. Take a look at my three part Guide to independent consulting 101.

Advice for Seasoned & Growing Operations

I’ve been working as a freelancer for 17 years now, and I’ve certainly learned a lot. So when I flip through the book, it confirms many of those lessons. But I also found material that I could use. For example chapter 7 Troubleshooting she has examples of situations where you and your client are out of sync, and offers “triple-a communication” solutions to those problems. This is the type of advice you’ll definitely need, as these scenarios are inevitable in freelance work. Also I found Chapter 10 Ways to Grow very helpful. Her list of “How do you know it’s time to grow” outlines some surprising and helpful thoughts on what to do if you have too much work. I’ve started dabbling with subcontracting and hiring additional help, so these chapters I’m finding very helpful.


There are a few things that I’d differ with Sara slightly on. Here are my thoughts.

Avoiding Contracts and Lawyers

I don’t get to heavy with lawyers and contracts. I know I know people say this is crazy, but over the years my method has served me well. It starts with a simple premise – I never intend to go to court. What do I mean? It costs too much, both in real dollars, time spent, but most of all stress. If you’ve ever been on jury duty you know what I mean.

With that, you pull the perceived safety net completely out from under yourself. So I am careful and cautious as a result. My *contracts* are simple emails, in which I outline what I’ll do, what the client will do, and who will do what when. I do all this in plain language, without any lawyer-ese. What I do get though is a confirmed *yes* in an email. This email thread is above and beyond verbal conversations and phone calls. It allows clarification down the line if you and the client have differences.

I also insist on a deposit of some kind. It doesn’t have to be a lot, but it is a hoop that you ask your client to jump through. This is very important. So-called dead beat clients will fail this test. If they are very very hesitant to provide a deposit, they are either uncomfortable with you, or are short on budget. Either case should be a red flag. Managing this relationship is very very important, when you plan never to rely on legal recourse for differences.

Who’s Played? Get paid!

On page 195 she talks about the Freelancer’s Union Client Scorecard, and “outing” clients who don’t pay. I personally think this is a bad road to go down. Why? Well there are a few reasons.

1. There are two sides to every coin

When a company hires an outside resource, they don’t have control over day-to-day operations, and overseeing what the person is doing. And yes, sadly there are many levels of work quality. So there can be differences. In my experience all those differences can and should be worked out. Communication is key and I think if you follow all of Sara’s advice on triple-A communication, you’ll avoid these situations. I do feel though that these ***

2. You can ask for an insurance deposit

Asking for a deposit from a new prospect is an important step. Without a past history of paying, and paying timely, this is a hoop you’re asking them to jump through. It proves that the budget exists, it proves that the team or director that hired you has communicated that to AP, and simply that you’re in the system. In my experience after the first check, things tend to go smoothly. If you’re experiencing trouble with this step, ask yourself – Are we on the same page? Where is the disconnect? Is the client confident you’ll deliver, and complete? Where is the hesitation?

3. It could hurt you in the end

Lastly these type of “outing” boards might hurt you in the end. If you gain a reputation for creating bad publicity or press for one firm, others may not want to work with you. I also think they are a distraction from communicating and resolving issues, and/or finding other work.

[quote]Apply all of Sara’s advice, especially those around Triple-A Communication, and you’ll likely do very well as a solopreneur. Let’s avoid becoming part of the 44% of freelancer’s who’ve reportedly had trouble getting paid![/quote]

Don’t undercharge for Services

Another point I’ll underline is charging for services. There is some talk in the book of wage wars, and 44% of freelancers not getting paid. In my experience being a freelancer is more like being another corporation. Corps fight with each other all the time. They have differences, and duke it out. It’s a bit dog eat dog out there. If you’re not prepared for that, you may be in for an uphill battle. Over the years I’ve certainly had differences with clients, but I’ve never not gotten paid. I *have* however turned away work, if I got a bad feeling about the client.

I wrote a critique of John Greathouse’s Beware the Consultant that might interest readers here. Take a look at my article Beware the Client.

That said you should be charging more than your fulltime brothers and sisters. Let’s give an example. Say your fulltime job would pay 75k/year. This theoretically is about $37.50/hr (40 hours x 50 weeks). However as a freelancer you must also pay for benefits like health insurance, retirement funds, downtime when you’re not billing, overhead of networking and meetings. You also have some additional taxes to pay. I my experience at minimum you should be charging roughly double this amount just to break even. If you’re not, it simply won’t make financial sense to stay freelancing. More likely you should be charging roughly 3x this base hourly amount. If you’re not, you may over time drift back towards fulltime employment.

I wrote another article on this topic Why do people leave consulting.

All of this should be part of educating the client. It’s often forgotten when firms look at outsourcing to get projects completed. So you should explain all of these costs clearly, and compare yourself to larger firms and agencies. These folks tend to be a *LOT* more expensive than a solopreneur.

All together now…

Sara’s bible is one every freelancer should have a copy of. It is the most complete book for a solo operator I’ve seen. Besides a few criticisms I have, it is a superb book and sure to be a reference you’ll turn to again and again.

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Why do people leave consulting?

Join 12,100 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

As a long time freelancer, it’s a question that’s intrigued me for some time. I do have some theories…

First, definitions… I’m not talking about working for a large consulting firm. Although this role may be called “consultant”, my meaning is consultant as sole proprietor, entrepreneur, gun for hire or lone wolf.

1. Make more money in a fulltime role

I’ve met a lot of people who fall into this trap. They take a fulltime role simply because it pays better. That raises a lot of questions…

o Are you pricing right?

You could be pricing to high to get *enough* work. You may also be pricing too low to cover benefits, health insurance and so forth. Or perhaps you can’t sell to your rate. You can be smart skills-wise, but do you feel your clients pain? Are you good at being a businessman? Consistent?

o Can you sell, and put together an appealing proposal?

o Can you execute to the clients satisfaction?

o Can you followup consistently while accounts payable gets tied up in knots?

o Can you followup if your client executes past their spend?

Running a business is complicated, and a lot of expenses can be hard to juggle. You will find times when a client may have spent a little faster than their revenue, and have trouble finding money when the invoice arrives. Followup, patience and persistence is key.

Read: Why high availability is so very hard to deliver

Want more? We wrote an in depth 3 part guide to consulting.

2. Make a consistent paycheck in a fulltime position

o Are you networking enough?

If you take a longterm gig and get comfortable, your pipeline can dry up. And your pipeline is the key to your longterm strength, and regular business. You must get out there, and let people know about you, your services, and your availability.

If you don’t network regularly, post across the web, engage on social media channels, blog regularly and so forth, you’ll likely just land a series of 6-12 month fulltimeish gigs through recruiters or headshops.

Related: 5 ways to evaluate independent consultants

[quote]Being a freelancer or entrepreneur involves wearing many hats. Finding business involves networking & marketing. Delivering to their needs involves emotional intelligence. And actually getting paid on time is a whole artform in itself. Leave a good taste in their mouth and your reputation will spread quickly by word of mouth.[/quote]

o Do you really *LIKE* being an entrepreneur?

Are you consistent? Consulting is like running a marathon, if you burn out you may give up!

Have a large web property or application which is experiencing some growing pains? Take a look at how we do performance reviews. It may be just what you’re looking for.

Related: MySQL interview guide for managers and candidates alike

3. Do you like the lifestyle of larger corporate environments?

o Fulltime roles allow for much more jedi sword play. Maneuvering up the ranks involves relationship building as much as consulting, but with a more well defined ladder to climb.

o Sometimes you’ll find pass the buck and pointing fingers quite common.

o There are roles involving managing people and processes. These less often lend themselves to short term or situational consulting arrangements. If you lean towards those roles

Trying to hire top tech talent? Here’s our MySQL DBA hiring guide & interview questions

[quote]Working as a sole proprietor for a couple of decades has taught me to be very entrepreneurial. It is every bit about building a real-world startup[/quote]

4. Want to do more cutting edge & at the keyboard work

Consulting can and often does allow you to bump into the latest technologies, and get your feet wet with what cutting edge firms are doing. However in a fulltime role you can more completely immerse yourself in the technology, and those long term solutions.

Also: Why devops talent is in short supply

o You can take part in R&D – Google’s 20% projects, for example

o You can build hypothetical projects

o You can work in more idealistic environments, operations and even lectures & training

Though you can certainly do all of this as a freelancer, you have to build enough capital, and so forth to make it work.

Juggling job roles as a consultant isn’t easy. What a CTO must never do.

5. Don’t like running a small business

Consulting as a sole proprietor and staying in business for almost twenty years, I’ve learned that it is every bit about running a small business or startup.

A. Acquiring customers, networking, marketing
B. Understanding their needs and delivering to improve their position
C. Pricing in a your customers understand
D. Offering value to your customers, at a competitive price
E. Managing relationships so your brand or reputation precedes you
F. Making sure payments and invoicing isn’t a hurdle, followup
G. Pacing yourself like a marathon runner – keep doing what you’re doing right

Read this far? Get our scalable startups monthly newsletter. We cover these topics in detail, year in and year out.

Consulting essentials: Building your business

In the last two posts on how to build a successful consulting business I shared advice and tips on closing deals and managing and completing your engagements.

This post will look at where to focus your efforts in order to sustain your consulting business, and build skills.

Focus on your subject matter expertise

Being a subject matter expert takes years of education, and professional experience to build. It’s your most valuable asset. Build it, and use it. This is not to say there isn’t great value in being a generalist as I’ve emphasized in blog postings. But don’t get distracted trying to do things others can do better. Web-based newsletter managers can do it better than you can, professional invoicing solutions as well. Though you might be able to do a bit of HTML and graphic design, if that’s not your expertise, hire someone to do your website in WordPress. You’ll save time and money in the long run, and their professional experience will surely include a few surprising nuggets of value that you wouldn’t have known yourself.

Manage your business with online tools

There are a myriad of online tools to help you run your business better.

Google Analytics – Get insights on what parts of your site your customers find valuable. Learn to convert those visitors with downloads, newsletter signups and ebooks for sale.

Freshbooks, Zoho or Paymo – There are many online invoicing solutions, so best to evaluate them for your specific needs. The point is, using a solution will save you money in the end, and make you more professional in the process. It’ll help you track monthly & yearly, send reminders, and summarize things for you all in one place.

Mailchimp – Newsletter creation can’t get any more fun than with mailchimp. With endless video howtos, documents, and great support, plus templates for your newsletter that come in every shape and size, these guys have really thought of everything. What’s more the graphs and campaign reports will give you insight into what topics are popular, and what resonates with your audience.

Google Docs and Calendars allow you to share your schedule and work with a small team. So whether it’s communicating things with your clients, or your subcontractors, these tools are essential.

Dropbox – Another indispensable tool for collaboration, share documents easily across the web.

Don’t Be a Commodity

If your prospect is asking you for a resume, and comparing you to some outsourced resources provide, you’re not going to get very far as a consultant. Don’t be a generic resource that sits at the keyboard and churns out code.

What’s the alternative? Learn about business, talk to business stakeholders, listen to their concerns, and learn to speak their language. Use stories, and analogies. Reach across the table to speak in terms that everyone can understand. Your value is in symplifying complex technology.

Be Hungry & Don’t Give Up!

Being hungry means continuing to improve on your weaknesses, experimenting with different rates until you match the market demand, managing multiple projects and always networking widely. Spend less than you make and build up six to twelve months cushion. This will allow you much more freedom to take only the projects you want. Learn to pick and choose.

Further Reading…

There are lots of other areas you’ll lean about, running a successful consulting business. Here are a few:

  • managing cash flow
  • paying quarterly & yearly corp taxes
  • paying subcontractors
  • managing & accounting for expenses