Tag Archives: cto

iHeavy Insights 77 – What Consultants Do


What Do Consultants Do?

Consultants bring a whole host of tools to experiences to bear on solving your business problems.  They can fill a need quickly, look in the right places, reframe the problem, communicate and get teams working together, and bring to light problems on the horizon. And they tell stories of challenges they faced at other businesses, and how they solved them.

Frame or Reframe The Problem

Oftentimes businesses see the symptoms of a larger problem, but not the cause.  Perhaps their website is sluggish at key times, causing them to lose customers.  Or perhaps it is locking up inexplicably.  Framing the problem may involve identifying the bottleneck and pointing to a particular misconfigured option in the database or webserver.  Or it may mean looking at the technical problem you’ve chosen to solve and asking if it meets or exceeds what the business needs.

Tell Business Stories

Clients often have a collection of technologies and components in place to meet their business needs.  But day-to-day running of a business is ultimately about bringing a product or service to your customer.  Telling stories of challenges and solutions of past customers, helps illustrate, educate, and communicate problems you’re facing today.

Fill A Need Quickly

If you have an urgent problem, and your current staff is over extended, bringing in a consultant to solve a specific problem can be a net gain for everyone.  They get up to speed quickly, bring fresh perspectives, and review your current processes and operations.  What’s more they can be used in a surgical way, to augment your team for a short stint.

Get Teams Communicating

I’ve worked at quite a number of firms over the years and tasked with solving a specific technical problem only to find the problem was a people problem to begin with.  In some cases the firm already has the knowledge and expertise to solve a problem, but some members are blocking.  This can be because some folks feel threatened by a new solution which will take away responsibilities they formerly held.  Or it can be because they feel some solution will create new problems which they will then be responsible to cleanup.  In either case bridging the gap between business needs and operations teams to solve those needs can mean communicating to each team in ways that make sense to them.  A technical detail oriented focus makes most sense when working with the engineering teams, business and bottom-line focused when communicating with the management team.

Highlight Or Bring To Light Problems On Horizon

Is our infrastructure a ticking timebomb?  Perhaps our backups haven’t been tested and are missing some crucial component?  Or we’ve missed some security consideration, left some password unset, left the proverbial gate open to the castle.  When you deal with your operations on a day-to-day basis, little details can be easy to miss.  A fresh perspective can bring needed insight.

BOOK REVIEW – Jaron Lanier – You Are Not a Gadget

Lanier is a programmer, musician, the father of VR way back in the 90’s, and wide-ranging thinker on topics in computing and the internet.

His new book is a great, if at times meandering read on technology, programming, schizophrenia, inflexible design decisions, marxism, finance transformed by cloud, obscurity & security, logical positivism, strange loops and more.

He opposes the thinking-du-jour among computer scientists, leaning in a more humanist direction summed up here:  “I believe humans are the result of billions of years of implicit, evolutionary study in the school of hard knocks.”    The book is worth a look.

Metrics Bridge Gap Between IT & Business Units

On the business side we’ve all seen requests for hardware purchases that seem astronomical, or somehow out of proportion to the project at hand.  And on the IT side we’ve been faced with the challenge of selling capital expenditures on technology, as demands grow.

Collecting statistics on real usage of server systems, and then connecting the dots to business metrics is an excellent way to bridge the gap.  This allows IT to draw concrete connection between technology investment, and reaching business goals.

Metrics and drawing the dotted line in this way also educates folks on both sides of the tracks.  It educates technologists on exactly how technology purchases can be justified, by their direct return to the business.  And it educates finance and business executives on how those hardware purchases directly contribute to business growth.

Introduction to EC2 Cloud Deployments

Cloud Computing holds a lot of promise, but there are also a lot of speed bumps in the road along the way.

In this six part series we’re going to cover a lot of ground.  We don’t intend this series to be an overly technical nuts and bolts howto.  Rather we will discuss high level issues and answer questions that come up for CTOs, business managers, and startup CEOs.

Some of the tantalizing issues we’ll address include:

  • How do I make sure my application is built for the cloud with scalability baked into the architecture?
  • I know disk performance is crucial for my database tier.  How do I get the best disk performance with Amazon Web Services & EC2?
  • How do I keep my AWS passwords, keys & certificates secure?
  • Should I be doing offsite backups as well, or are snapshots enough?
  • Cloud providers such as Amazon seem to have poor SLAs (service level agreements).  How do I mitigate this using availability zones & regions?
  • Cloud hosting environments like Amazons provide no perimeter security.  How do I use security groups to ensure my setup is robust and bulletproof?
  • Cloud deployments change the entire procurement process, handing a lot of control over to the web operations team.  How do I ensure that finance and ops are working together, and a ceiling budget is set and implemented?
  • Reliability of Amazon EC2 servers is much lower than traditional hosted servers.  Failure is inevitable.  How do we use this fact to our advantage, forcing discipline in the deployment and disaster recovery processes?  How do I make sure my processes are scripted & firedrill tested?
  • Snapshot backups and other data stored in S3 are somewhat less secure than I’d like.  Should I use encryption to protect this data?  When and where should I use encrypted filesystems to protect my more sensitive data?
  • How can I best use availability zones and regions to geographically disperse my data and increase availability?

As we publish each of the individual articles in this series we’ll link them to the titles below.  So check back soon!

  • Building Highly Scalable Web Applications for the Cloud
  • Managing Security in Amazon Web Services
  • MySQL Databases in the Cloud – Best Practices
  • Backup and Recovery in the Cloud – A Checklist
  • Cloud Deployments – Disciplined Infrastructure
  • Cloud Computing Use Cases