Tag Archives: asynchronous

5 things toxic to scalability

The.Rohit - Flickr
The.Rohit – Flickr

Check out our followup post 5 More Things Deadly to Scalability

If you’re using MySQL checkout 5 ways to boost MySQL scalability.

1. Object Relational Mappers

ORMs are popular among developers but not among performance experts.  Why is that?  Primarily these two engineers experience a web application from entirely different perspectives.  One is building functionality, delivering features, and results are measured on fitting business requirements.  Performance and scalability are often low priorities at this stage.  ORMs allow developers to be much more productive, abstracting away the SQL difficulties of interacting with the backend datastore, and allowing them to concentrate on building the features and functionality.


Scalability is about application, architecture and infrastructure design, and careful management of server components.

On the performance side the picture is a bit different.  By leaving SQL query writing to an ORM, you are faced with complex queries that the database cannot optimize well.  What’s more ORMs don’t allow easy tweaking of queries, slowing down the tuning process further.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

2. Synchronous, Serial, Coupled or Locking Processes

Locking in a web application operates something like traffic lights in the real world.  Replacing a traffic light with a traffic circle often speeds up traffic dramatically.  That’s because when you’re out somewhere in the country where there’s very little traffic, no one is waiting idly at a traffic light for no reason.  What’s more even when there’s a lot of traffic, a traffic circle keeps things flowing.  If you need locking, better to use InnoDB tables as they offer granular row level locking than table level locking like MyISAM tables.

Avoid things like semi-synchronous replication that will wait for a message from another node before allowing the code to continue.  Such waits can add up in a highly transactional web application with many thousands of concurrent sessions.

Avoid any type of two-phase commit mechanism that we see in clustered databases quite often.  Multi-phase commit provides a serialization point so that multiple nodes can agree on what data looks like, but they are toxic to scalability.  Better to use technologies that employ an eventually consistent algorithm.

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. One Copy of Your Database

Without replication, you rely on only one copy of your database.  In this configuration, you limit all of your webservers to using a single backend datastore, which becomes a funnel or bottleneck.  It’s like a highway that is under construction, forcing all the cars to squeeze into one lane.  It’s sure to slow things down.  Better to build parallel roads to start with, and allow the application aka the drivers to choose alternate routes as their schedule and itinerary dictate.

Using MySQL? Checkout our our howto Easy Replication Setup with Hotbackups.

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Having No Metrics

Having no metrics in place is toxic to scalability because you can’t visualize what is happening on your systems.  Without this visual cue, it is hard to get business units, developers and operations teams all on the same bandwagon about scalability issues.  If teams are having trouble groking this, realize that these tools simple provide analytics for infrastructure.

There are tons of solutions too, that use SNMP and are non-invasive.  Consider Cacti, Munin, OpenNMS, Ganglia and Zabbix to name a few.  Metrics collections can involve business metrics like user registrations, accounts or widgets sold.  And of course they should also include low level system cpu, memory, disk & network usage as well as database level activity like buffer pool, transaction log, locking sorting, temp table and queries per second activity.

Also: Are SQL Databases dead?

5. Lack of Feature Flags

Applications built without feature flags make it much more difficult to degrade gracefully.  If your site gets bombarded by a spike in web traffic and you aren’t magically able to scale and expand capacity, having inbuilt feature flags gives the operations team a way to dial down the load on the servers without the site going down.   This can buy you time while you scale your webservers and/or database tier or even retrofit your application to allow multiple read and write databases.

Without these switches in place, you limit scalability and availability.

Also: Is high availability overrated? The myth of five nines…

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