Category Archives: iHeavy Newsletter

Why your cloud is speeding for a scalability cliff

Join 14,000 and follow Sean Hull on twitter.

Don’t believe me that you’re headed for the cliff?

A startup scales up to no avail

Towards the end of 2012 I worked with an internet startup in the online education space. Their web application was not unusual, built in PHP and using Linux, Apache & Mysql all running on Amazon web services. They had three webservers in the mix and were seeing 1000 simultaneous users during peak traffic.

All this sounds normal except they were hitting major stalls, and app slowdowns. Before I was brought in they had scaled their MySQL server from a large to extra large instance, but were still seeing slow downs. What can we do, they asked?

I dug in and took at look at the server variables. They seemed to have substantial memory allocated to the server and Innodb. I then dug into the slow query log. This is a great facility in MySQL which sifts through activity happening against your database, and logs those which take a long time. In this case we had it set to ½ second and found tons of activity.

What was happening? Turns out there were lots of missing indexes, and badly written SQL queries.

A related popular piece AirBNB didn’t have to fail despite Amazon’s outage.

Also: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

How can we resolve these problems?

The customer asked me to explain the situation. I asked them to imagine finding a friend’s apartment in NYC without an address. Not easy right? You have to visit all of it’s 8 million residents until you locate your friend’s home.

Also check out: Real Disaster Recovery Lessons from Sandy.

This is what you’re asking the database to do without indexes. It’s very serious. It’s even compounded when you have hundreds or thousands of other users hitting different pages all with the same problems. Your whole dataset can fit in memory you tell me? So-called logical I/Os still cost, and can indeed cost dearly. What’s more sorting, joining, and grouping all compound the amount of memory your dataset can require.

Related: Why you can’t find a MySQL DBA

Why didn’t a bigger server help?

Modern computers are fast and EC2 extra large instances have a lot of memory. But with thousands or tens of thousands of users hitting pages simultaneously, you can take down even the largest servers.

[quote]Throwing hardware at the problem is like kicking the can down the road. Ultimately you have to pay your debt and optimize your code.[/quote]

Read: Why Twitter made a shocking admission about their data centers in the IPO

High performance code isn’t automatic

We have automation, we have agile processes, we can scale web, cache and search servers with ease. The danger is in thinking that deploying in the cloud will magically deliver scalability. Another danger is thinking that ORMs like ActiveRecord in Ruby or Hibernate in Java will solve these problems. Yes they are great tools to speed up prototyping, but we become dependent on them, and they are difficult to rip out later.

Want more, check out our 5 Things Toxic To Scalability.

Also: Why startups are trying to do without techops and failing

Fred Wilson says Speed is an essential Feature

Fred Wilson recently gave a talk on his top 10 golden principals to successful web applications. He says speed is the most important feature. Enough said!

The 10 Golden Principles of Successful Web Apps from Carsonified on Vimeo.

Hiring a MySQL DBA? Check out our DBA Hiring Guide with advice and hints for candidates and CTOs as well!

Read this: Why a four letter word still divides dev and ops

Want more? Grab our Scalable Startups monthly for more tips and special content. Here’s a sample

A master isn't born but made

A review of Mastery by Robert Greene.

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

Robert Greene’s 48 Laws of Power was a great read, offering endless lessons for business and personal dealings. When I saw he just published a new book, I was quick to grab a copy.

What I like about his writing is that he’s replete with counterintuitive bits of wisdom, that really offer new perspectives on old topics.

[quote]
Many people might find the notion of an apprenticeship and skill acquisition as quaint relics of bygone eras when work meant making things. After all, we have entered the information and computer age, in which technology makes it so we can di without the kinds of menial tasks that require practice and repetition; so many things have become virtual in our lives making the craftsman model obsolete. Or so the argument goes.
[/quote]

You might also enjoy our 3 part consulting 101 guide and our very popular DBA hiring guide.

He goes on to elaborate on this idea…

[quote]
In truth, however, this idea of the nature of the times we are living in is completely incorrect, even dangerous. The era we have entered is not one in which technology will make everything easier, but rather a time of increased complexity that affects every field. In business, competition has become globalized and more intense. A business person must have a command of a much larger picture than in the past, which means more knowledge and skills. The future in science does not lie in specialization but rather in combining and cross-fertilization of knowledge in various fields. In the arts, tastes and styles are changing at an accelerated rate. An artist must be on top of this and capable of creating new forms, always remaining ahead of the curve. This often requires having more than just a specialized knowledge of that particular art form — it requires knowing other arts, even the sciences, and what is happening in the world.
[/quote]

I couldn’t agree more. We wrote a piece a while back called Why generalists are better at scaling the web and that aligns nicely with what Greene is getting at here.

He begins with insight on finding ones life task, then apprenticeship & mentoring then working through the social challenges that are always present and finally ways to stimulate the creative-active impulses.

I really like that he emphasizes it as a process and one of life-long hard work. This resonates a lot for me, as that’s how I’ve found success doing independent consulting over the years. There have been a lot of ups and downs, wrong turns, and missteps, but tenacity wins out in the end. He even dispells the myth of the naturally gifted, such as Mozart or Einstein, arguing that in fact they did put in the requisite 10,000 hours of study and were not born with mastery as such.

Greene’s lastest book is a pleasure to read, and full of insight for startups, programmers, designers and business people alike. I highly recommend it.

Want more? Grab our Scalable Startups monthly for more tips and special content. Here’s a sample

Going Solo for Fun or Profit?

Sara Horowitz has serious chops. Independent herself, she started Freelancer’s Union way back in 1995. Back then it was tougher as a freelancer. Through her great efforts, we’ve all benefited.

So when I saw she’d published a guide called “Freelancer’s Bible”, I was quick to grab a copy. And the book doesn’t disappoint. I wish this book had existed when I got my start way back when I first moved to NYC in 1996.

A budding freelancer

As a budding freelancer, you’ve got a ton of new skills to pickup, where to start? Flip to Part 1 and you’ll get a quick hitchhikers guide, with advice on setting up your office and organizing your time, to pitching to prospects, networking, and building a portfolio of different types of clients to keep your workflow steady. You also learn how to package your services, and the myriad ways to set fees from hourly, to project based and day rates to packages.

[quote]Network & market yourself, package & price services, communicate well and manage timelines, deliver, bill and finally get paid. Each step is outlined here in easy to read bullets, and helpful “Ask Sara” sections. Easy layout, and a pleasure to read.[/quote]

As I was reading these early chapters, I thought it would be nice to have a chapter on social media. Turns out I spoke too soon, as I flip through the pages, chapter 9 is all about marketing and social media, online tools to build your reputation and influence. Also I like that she appeals to the practical approach. For example Sara emphases that you let go of strategy, and experiment with different options, and methods. This is exactly what I’ve done over the years, and it’s the best way to find out what works for your personal style, as well as your industry. Trial and error!

I’ve written a guide on this topic myself. Take a look at my three part Guide to independent consulting 101.

Advice for Seasoned & Growing Operations

I’ve been working as a freelancer for 17 years now, and I’ve certainly learned a lot. So when I flip through the book, it confirms many of those lessons. But I also found material that I could use. For example chapter 7 Troubleshooting she has examples of situations where you and your client are out of sync, and offers “triple-a communication” solutions to those problems. This is the type of advice you’ll definitely need, as these scenarios are inevitable in freelance work. Also I found Chapter 10 Ways to Grow very helpful. Her list of “How do you know it’s time to grow” outlines some surprising and helpful thoughts on what to do if you have too much work. I’ve started dabbling with subcontracting and hiring additional help, so these chapters I’m finding very helpful.

Criticisms

There are a few things that I’d differ with Sara slightly on. Here are my thoughts.

Avoiding Contracts and Lawyers

I don’t get to heavy with lawyers and contracts. I know I know people say this is crazy, but over the years my method has served me well. It starts with a simple premise – I never intend to go to court. What do I mean? It costs too much, both in real dollars, time spent, but most of all stress. If you’ve ever been on jury duty you know what I mean.

With that, you pull the perceived safety net completely out from under yourself. So I am careful and cautious as a result. My *contracts* are simple emails, in which I outline what I’ll do, what the client will do, and who will do what when. I do all this in plain language, without any lawyer-ese. What I do get though is a confirmed *yes* in an email. This email thread is above and beyond verbal conversations and phone calls. It allows clarification down the line if you and the client have differences.

I also insist on a deposit of some kind. It doesn’t have to be a lot, but it is a hoop that you ask your client to jump through. This is very important. So-called dead beat clients will fail this test. If they are very very hesitant to provide a deposit, they are either uncomfortable with you, or are short on budget. Either case should be a red flag. Managing this relationship is very very important, when you plan never to rely on legal recourse for differences.

Who’s Played? Get paid!

On page 195 she talks about the Freelancer’s Union Client Scorecard, and “outing” clients who don’t pay. I personally think this is a bad road to go down. Why? Well there are a few reasons.

1. There are two sides to every coin

When a company hires an outside resource, they don’t have control over day-to-day operations, and overseeing what the person is doing. And yes, sadly there are many levels of work quality. So there can be differences. In my experience all those differences can and should be worked out. Communication is key and I think if you follow all of Sara’s advice on triple-A communication, you’ll avoid these situations. I do feel though that these ***

2. You can ask for an insurance deposit

Asking for a deposit from a new prospect is an important step. Without a past history of paying, and paying timely, this is a hoop you’re asking them to jump through. It proves that the budget exists, it proves that the team or director that hired you has communicated that to AP, and simply that you’re in the system. In my experience after the first check, things tend to go smoothly. If you’re experiencing trouble with this step, ask yourself – Are we on the same page? Where is the disconnect? Is the client confident you’ll deliver, and complete? Where is the hesitation?

3. It could hurt you in the end

Lastly these type of “outing” boards might hurt you in the end. If you gain a reputation for creating bad publicity or press for one firm, others may not want to work with you. I also think they are a distraction from communicating and resolving issues, and/or finding other work.

[quote]Apply all of Sara’s advice, especially those around Triple-A Communication, and you’ll likely do very well as a solopreneur. Let’s avoid becoming part of the 44% of freelancer’s who’ve reportedly had trouble getting paid![/quote]

Don’t undercharge for Services

Another point I’ll underline is charging for services. There is some talk in the book of wage wars, and 44% of freelancers not getting paid. In my experience being a freelancer is more like being another corporation. Corps fight with each other all the time. They have differences, and duke it out. It’s a bit dog eat dog out there. If you’re not prepared for that, you may be in for an uphill battle. Over the years I’ve certainly had differences with clients, but I’ve never not gotten paid. I *have* however turned away work, if I got a bad feeling about the client.

I wrote a critique of John Greathouse’s Beware the Consultant that might interest readers here. Take a look at my article Beware the Client.

That said you should be charging more than your fulltime brothers and sisters. Let’s give an example. Say your fulltime job would pay 75k/year. This theoretically is about $37.50/hr (40 hours x 50 weeks). However as a freelancer you must also pay for benefits like health insurance, retirement funds, downtime when you’re not billing, overhead of networking and meetings. You also have some additional taxes to pay. I my experience at minimum you should be charging roughly double this amount just to break even. If you’re not, it simply won’t make financial sense to stay freelancing. More likely you should be charging roughly 3x this base hourly amount. If you’re not, you may over time drift back towards fulltime employment.

I wrote another article on this topic Why do people leave consulting.

All of this should be part of educating the client. It’s often forgotten when firms look at outsourcing to get projects completed. So you should explain all of these costs clearly, and compare yourself to larger firms and agencies. These folks tend to be a *LOT* more expensive than a solopreneur.

All together now…

Sara’s bible is one every freelancer should have a copy of. It is the most complete book for a solo operator I’ve seen. Besides a few criticisms I have, it is a superb book and sure to be a reference you’ll turn to again and again.

Read this far? Grab our newsletter Scalable Startups.

Lessons from Locksmiths and the 99%

Just finished reading Dan Ariely’s new book The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty. What a great title for a book on cheating & lying.

Dishonesty is pretty easy to understand, isn’t it? We know when someone is being honest or not, and we ourselves are of course never dishonest? Or so we think.

Well your preexisting ideas about honesty are about to be turned upside down.
Ariely has an amazing storytelling ability that will leaving you scratching your head and saying – I hadn’t thought of that.

Conventional economics theory has it that people will be dishonest when there is low risk and it serves their economic interest. But it’s actually much much more complex.

He tells one story of how a cab driver lies about the fare in favor of himself, while at other times in favor of the passenger! Or for example the story of how soda & some cash are left in an office refrigerator. The sodas disappear, but the money remains.

Perhaps the most interesting discussion is that of law firms & billable hours. There is of course the question of what counts as a billable hour, and where the rounding happens. But what’s more accountability can and does become a measure of how much work gets done. So those who round down because they are more honest, may be perceived to be doing the least amount of work! Conflicts of interest indeed.

[quote]Sometimes conflicts of interest cloud our judgement and steer our thinking. In professions where we make recommendations and then also provide service based on those recommendations those may be difficult to eliminate. Consumers or businesses should make every effort to find service providers with the least conflicts.[/quote]

We’re a service provider ourselves. Wondering how we work? Take a peek at our Anatomy of a Performance Review to get insight.

Interestingly, based on the soda story among others, it turns out people are less likely to be dishonest when cash is involved. So he wonders, as we become more of a cashless society, it may be that our moral compass slips? Still hot on the heels of our housing financial crisis it does make one wonder.

Perhaps my favorite anecdote was one where told the story of locking himself out of his apartment. After very quickly picking the lock he was surprised. The locksmith explained that doors are very easy to pick and open for a professional. You wouldn’t need locks for the 1% of people who are honest. Nor would you need them for the 1% of people who are thieves, they can pick your lock easily. Locks are for the 98% of people who are mostly honest, but might be tempted to be dishonest if the conditions are right. What he was also saying was that 99% of people are not completely perfectly honest.

Great read and excellent food for thought.

Read this far? Grab our newsletter.

Anatomy of a Performance Review

A lot of firms come to us with a specific scalability problem. “Our user base is growing rapidly and the website is falling over!” Or they’re selling more widgets, “Our shopping cart is slowing down and we’re seeing users abandon their purchases”. These are real startup growing pains, so what to do?

We like to take a measured approach with these types of challenges, so we thought it would be helpful to run through a hypothetical scenario and see how we work.

Related: Why website speed is crucial to business

Having trouble with scalability? Check out our 5 things toxic to scalability piece.

1. Contract outline

First we talk on the phone, or meet face to face and discuss what’s happening. Do you have one page that’s problematic? Is the website slow during certain hours? Or are you seeing erratic behavior and can’t point to a single source?

From there we outline a course of action, based on:

o talking with team, devs & architects
o reviewing systems first hand
o identifying bottlenecks and trouble spots

This with this outline we’ll include an estimate of the number of work days it’ll take to complete. We’ll then send that back to you for review, exchange a deposit and set a start date.

2. Meet team & discuss architecture

Next we’ll meet the team and review the problems in more technical detail. If you’re in NYC we’ll probably make a stop into your offices and have a warm meet & greet. If you’re located further afield we can either meet over a skype call, or arrange for us to travel to your location for the start of the engagement.

3. Measure current throughput

In order to get a sense of the current state of the systems we’ll measure some system metrics. This could be load average or queries per second or other MySQL internal metrics. We’ll also look at some business metrics such as speed of an ecommerce checkout, or a speed test on a particularly slow page.

These metrics are designed to create a baseline of where things are before any changes are made.

[quote]Measuring both business and system metrics before and after changes, allow a rough ROI measurement to be done. This goes a long way towards justifying the expense of a performance review, current and future.[/quote]

4. Review systems, configurations & setups

Next we’ll jump on the various systems and review configurations. This includes webservers, caching servers and the database servers as necessary. We’ll review memory settings, important configurations, all the dials and switches.

Along with this we’ll also review development and architecture. Are you using Java with Hibernate a popular ORM? Or perhaps CakePHP? Are you writing custom SQL code? Are developers up to speed with EXPLAIN and query profiling? For that matter is code in version control?

Just looking for a DBA? Check out our MySQL Hiring Guide.

5. Report on actionable advice & findings

Perhaps the most essential and useful part of an initial engagement is our overall findings and review report. We’ve found these are very valuable to firms as they speak to a lot of folks up and down the business hierarchy. They speak to management about high level architectural problems and structural or process related challenges. And they can speak well to developers and operations teams as they provide a third party birds eye view of day-to-day activities.

Take a look at a sample report we’ve prepared for Acme StartUp, Inc.

6. Discuss which steps to move on

From here we’ll meet again. In particular we’ll review the actionable advice. Some changes will be low cost, requiring no downtime, while others might require a downtime window. Further medium term changes might require refactoring some code and deploying. Typically the larger longer term architecture changes will also be outlined.

Based on time & costs, we’ll decide together which changes are a priority. Obviously we’ll want to move on low hanging fruit first, and move forward from there.

Want to learn more about us? Check out our testimonials and our about page.

7. Take action on agreed changes

Once we’ve decided which changes we’ll make, we’ll schedule downtime windows as needed and make the changes to systems. From there we’ll carefully observe everything for stability, and no adverse affects.

8. Measure throughput again

Based on the throughput measurements in #3 above, we’ll perform those same benchmarks again. We’ll check low level system metrics, along with higher level business & user based throughput. Both of these are important as they can provide different perspectives on changes made.

For example if the system metrics improve markedly, but the business or user metrics do not, we know are change had some affect on overall performance, but likely we did not identify the one which directly is causing the business slowdown.

9. Summarize findings & performance gain

In the most likely case they both improve markedly, and we can measure the improvements from our entire process of performance review.

This can be helpful and measuring overall return on investment for the engagement. ROI is obviously an important exercise as we want to know that the money is well spent.

10. Document solutions & recommendations

The last step is to document what we did and what we learned. This allows us to carry forward that knowledge and keep applying it to the development and operations process. This allows the business to continue adding value from the engagement even after it’s completed.

Read this far? Grab our newsletter.

Powerful punchy prose, big hit blog

Word Hero sounds familiar doesn’t it? I had bumped into the title here and there. I finally picked up a copy when I realized it was by the same author as my recent favorite Thank You For Arguing – Jay Heinrichs. Turns out his title inspiration was Guitar Hero, and therein lies the secret to success.

Get Viral

Timing is critical as we learned writing the book on Oracle and Open Source. But just as important is pithy, punchy prose.

Word Hero takes you through chapter by chapter introducing you lightly to the wisdom of the ancient Greeks, but more importantly explains exactly how to get to these phrases that have a life of their own.


o take great phrases & dissect them to see how they work
o illustrate great rhyming & verbing
o focus on the sound to make things lyrical
o puns, mad libs & the square root of rainbows

He quotes from great pop cultural stuff, and even a bit of Warren Buffet & Yogi Berra. By far my favorites though are his quotes from the popular TV show Glee:

[quote]You think that is hard? I’m passing a gallstone as we speak. That is hard![/quote]

If you’re a freelance blogger or sometime free agent, you should also take a look at Startup of You by Hoffman & Casnocha.

Practice your techniques

I definitely like the way Heinrichs breaks down techniques & offers illustrates exactly how to give it all a try yourself. I tried it myself a bit with this blog post. What do you think?

I also tried to put it to use in this review of Startup of You. I titled it Opportunity a day – career risk at bay. Kinda catchy I thought.

Definitely grab a copy of Word Hero, it’ll help you with your blogging, sending a memorable email, or putting together presentations that resonate.

Don’t forget to work on your Klout score!

Read this far? Grab our newsletter.

Opportunity a day – career risk at bay

Free Agent. Stress Test. Avoid Sameness

As the globalization juggernaut rolls on, it continues to create more Detroits. Skills and perspectives quickly become obsolete.

What to do in the face of such change?

[quote]Small fires prevent the big burn[/quote]

So there’s your quick answer. Get the book if you want more!

Some related material: why is it so hard to find a mysql dba?.
Consulting 101 Guide – Finding Business :: Completing Engagements :: Growing business

Your Mentors

On this tour, a free agent needs mentors. Hoffman & Casnocha provide you with plenty from stories & lessons from some of the startup industry’s finest. Jack Dorsey, Mark Andreesen, Cheryl Sandberg, Rick Warren, Paul Graham, Jeff Bezos, Joi Ito and a few of their own running Paypal & Linkedin.

What you’ll love

Each chapter closes with concrete actionable advice. The authors carefully craft marching orders for you in the next day, next week and next month. Go ahead, give them a try.

[quote]Safe is the new risky – Phil Simon[/quote]

An executive summary of Startup of You

1. develop your strengths
- what do you find easy that others find difficult?
- diversify asset mix aka learn new skills

2. plan to be nimble
- pivot as you learn more
- always prepare a lifeboat contingency plan

3. work & develop your network
- hangout with those already on the road
- domain experts, people who know you & smart people

4. hustle for breakout opportunities

5. Embrace baby steps of risk
- bounds of unemployment – shocks that motivate
- adjust your strategy & pivot if need be

What’s next?

Had a taste and want more? If you’re a MySQL DBA we wrote an interview guide. Also check out our Oracle dba interview questions.

Want more? Check out our best of content compilation.

[quote]Only the paranoid survive. – Andy Grove[/quote]

Read this far? Grab our newsletter. We cover all sorts of great topics for free agents, consultants, and those who want to hire them.

Social Scoring with Klout, Kred & PeerIndex

Klout, Kred or PeerIndex… What’s with all these new social scoring sites? I wanted to know the answer, so I picked up a copy of Return on Influence.

Schaefer’s book is not intimidating, it’s a short 180 pages plus a short appendix with a primer on all things social media.

Upon first opening the book, I wanted to get right to the meaty topic first, so I flipped straight to chapter 10 – how to increase your Klout score. I mean that’s really what we want to know right?

It lists three steps:

1. build your network of relevant & related fans

2. build content, create, curate or conversation

3. find influencers and engage

Of course the devil’s in the details.

When I was first exposed to twitter, I would crosspost blog posts or newsletters, then sit back and wonder why no one was clicking on my links! Is it only valuable for brands to send out press releases and speak to loyal customers?

The answer takes time, with trial and error to get the hang of. How do you write punchy 140 tweets that grab people, and make them click? That’s a talent all by itself. Being on point can only get you so far if you can’t shake people up with those pithy one liners.

Mark Schaefer has done a laudable job introducing the world of social media with great page after page of good stories. What’s more the title itself is what grabbed me, flipped Return On Investment on it’s head to the more nebulous social media influence measured by scores like Klout.

Still all those chapters discussing Cialdini’s concepts of social proof and reciprocity are all fine and good, but I learned most of what I needed to know about the topic from the first page.

After big time interactive marketing exec Sam Fiorella learned about Klout the hard way, he set out to improve his score that sat around a lowly 45.

[quote]Fiorella went on a tweeting rampage to increase his Klout score by any means. He was determined that his experience at the ad agency interview would enver be repeated. He carefully studied and tried to reproduce the online behaviors of top-rated influencers. When he spoke at conferences, he made sure that every slide had a tweetable quote aimed at the Klout algorithm and asked attendees to tweet his name throughout the presentation. He engineered his online engagement to attract attention of high Klout influencers who could bend his score upward and filtered his followers by their levels of influence so that he knew which contacts to nurture to affect his score.[/quote]

And what was Fiorella able to push his score to? The Elite level of 70! Wow not bad at all. You might call it gaming the algorithm, or you could call it doing all the things that social media marketing and networking demand. I’d personally be happy to hit the 45 myself!

Marketing isn’t just for the big guys anymore, and as the ranks of freelancers and independent consultants swells, more and more will be looking to improve their influence and reach. Social scoring, like website page ranking is another one of those measures and one of growing importance.

If you read this far, you’ll definitely want to grab our newsletter!

And just for posterity we thought we’d include our Klout badge below. Follow us on twitter we don’t mind the attention!

One more thing… if you love the newsletter, check out our archives. They go back 7+ years!

Business lessons from brokering a half million dollar deal

I’ve had my Manhattan loft in the market for some six months now. After dropping the asking price a couple of times, buyers are finally circling, and I’m close to finalizing a deal.  In that time however, I’ve learned some big lessons.  Real Estate, is the epitome of cutthroat capitalism and as such has some very potent lessons to teach about business.

Understand Interests – Two Sides to Every Argument

Brokers have an interest – to make their fee;  buyers have an interest – to lower the selling price, sellers have an interest to get the highest selling price.  On the surface this may seem self evident.  But dig a little deeper and you’ll learn more. Brokers are somewhat aligned with buyer and seller, but like a cab driver preferring lots of short trips, their incentive is to do more deals. Fewer deals with higher margins would actually cost them. A 1%-2% higher selling price may be significant to your bottom line but meaningless to theirs.

[quote]Business Lesson 1 – Pay close attention to each party’s interests and you’ll understand the negotiating dynamic more clearly.[/quote]

In brokering, like war, no one plays fair

Each industry has it’s own ugly side. No one calls back. No one emails back. There are no pleasantries. In some businesses where credibility and reputation are built over time, people do care–little bit. But in brokering a large deal they don’t.  Silence means “Hey, thanks for going out of your way to give us an hour of your time even though we were late.  We don’t care.  We no longer need you & we’re not gonna respond.”  Got it, heard you loud and clear!

[quote]Business Lesson 2 – Be prepared for selfishness and deception. In some cases watch out for cheaters and even fraud.  Don’t let this color all your interactions, but be aware that some parties may not have the same scruples as you do and some may even break the law. [/quote]

Markets are bigger than you are

You may think your house or apartment has some intrinsic value, based on renovations or the time you’ve held it, or some other more personal metric. However the market is ultimately what sets the price of the asset. Market trends can swing wildly and irrationally so be prepared to “get real”, as they say in the business.

[quote]Business Lesson 3 – Market forces set the price of a good or service. The door swings both ways so when there is a greater supply be prepared for the price to go down, and when location, asset or skills are in great demand, be prepared for the price to go up.[/quote]

Buyers move on emotion; facts get you only so far

Salesmen tell stories. It’s their job to engage, stir passions, get people to move. Sometimes these yarns are taller than you or I might like, but if people knew exactly what they wanted, brokers wouldn’t exist. This occurs across the spectrum in sales.

[quote]Business Lesson 4 – Pay less attention to the facts and arguments a salesmen presents to you. Only the underlying interest of each party will tell a clear story of motivations. Weigh that along with the market appetite and you should have a good idea of the right price.[/quote]

Protect your interests and time

Over the months I’ve been on the market, I’ve had countless brokers try to sell me their services. An exclusive seller agreement is valuable to a broker as it allows them to control the process and control the fee distribution. One broker made an appointment to come by with their buyer over a holiday weekend. Following up at the appointed time, they explained that they were running late though frankly the broker sounded hung over. Upon arrival they brought no buyer. Seeing my irritation, they quickly fabricated a story about a phantom buyer and their specific requirements. After wasting a few hours of my time and breaking up my holiday weekend, I never heard from them again. Not fun.

[quote]Business Lesson 5 – Qualify your prospect before you grant them your time. There are many parties who can and will waste your time if you’re not careful. Be diligent about weeding them out before clearing your schedule for them.[/quote]

Pro Blogging with the Pros

I picked up a copy of the Problogger book and flipped to the Blog Promotion chapter.  In it they recommended – Create compilation pages.

I tried it

I crafted a new post, selected some of my blogs most popular material, organized it with nice punchy one line summaries, and after about 20 minutes posted it.  Hey what the heck, I’ll give it a try.

It Worked!

The page got tons of traffic, after I shared it around. It doubled my typical daily traffic & the bounce rate ended up being really low as almost half of the people who hit the page clicked something.  It wasn't only the traffic from this page, but people clicking on through to other content featured there. Simple advice, straightforward results.  This is what I'm looking for in a book on blogging.

You'll find it is full of this type actionable advice. That's why it's so valuable.

  • interlink within your posts – this is huge!
  • highlight related posts
  • quote important points as excerpts
  • ask questions and invite comments

There are other great chapters on Social Media to get your posts going viral, and of course the ever important monetization topic is covered nicely.

Go pickup a copy of this book.  It’s worth much more than the cover price for sure!