Category Archives: Devops

5 surprising features in Amazon’s Lambda serverless offering

Amazon is building out it’s serverless offering at a rapid clip. Lambda makes a great solution for a lot of different use cases including:

o a hybrid approach, building lambda functions for small pieces of your application, sitting along side your full application, working in concert with it

o working with Kinesis firehose to add ETL functionality into your pipeline. Extract Transform & Load is a method of transforming data from a relational or backend transactional databases, into one better fit for reporting & analytics.

o retrofitting your API? Layer Lambda functions in front, to allow you to rebuild in a managed way.

o a natural way to build microservices, with each function as it’s own little universe

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Great, tons of ways to put serverless to use. What’s Amazon doing to make it even better? Here are some of the features you’ll find indispensible in building with Lambda.

1. Versioned functions

As your serverless functions get more sophisticated, you’ll want to control & deploy different versions. Lambda supports this, allowing you to upload multiple copies of the same function. Coupled with Aliases below, this becomes a very powerful feature.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

2. Aliases

As you deploy multiple versions of your functions in AWS, you don’t want to recreate the API endpoints each time. That’s where aliases come in. Create one alias for dev, another for test, and a third for production. That way when new versions of those are deployed, all you have to do is change the alias & QA or customers will be hitting the new code. Cool!

Related: Are you getting errors building lambda functions?

3. Caching & throttling

Using the API gateway, we can do some fancy footwork with Lambda. First we can enabling caching to speedup access to our endpoint. Control the time-to-live, capacity of the cache easily. We’ll also need to invalidate the cache when we make changes & redeploy our functions.

Throttling is another useful feature, allowing you to control the maximum number of times your function can be called per second on average (the rate) and maximum number of times (burst limit). These can be set at both the stage & method levels.

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

4. Stage variables

Creating multiple stages, for dev, test & production means you can separate out and control environment variables with more granular control. For example suppose you have access & secret keys to reach S3. You can set environment variables for these to avoid committing any credentials or secrets in your code. Definitely don’t do that!

Allowing multiple copies of stage variables, means you can set them separately for dev, test & production.

Also: How to deploy on Amazon EC2 with Vagrant?

5. Logging

You can enable logging in your Lambda function configuration. This will send error and/or info warning messages out to CloudWatch.

You may also choose the log all of the request & response data. This is controlled in the API Gateway settings for individual stages.

Also: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

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How can startups learn from the Dyn DNS outage?

storm coming

As most have heard by now, last Friday saw a serious DDOS attack against one of the major US DNS providers, Dyn.

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DNS being such a critical dependency, this affected many businesses across the board. We’re talking twitter, etsy, github, Airbnb & Reddit to name just a few. In fact Amazon Web Services itself was severely affected. And with so many companies hosting on the Amazon cloud, it’s no wonder this took down so much of the internet.

1. What happened?

According to Brian Krebs, a Mirai botnet was responsible for the attack. What’s even scarier, those requests originated for IOT devices. You know, baby monitors, webcams & DVRs. You’ve secured those right? ūüôā

Brian has posted a list of IOT device makers that have backdoors & default passwords and are involved. Interesting indeed.

Also: Is a dangerous anti-ops movement gaining momentum?

2. What can be done?

Companies like Dyn & Cloudflare among others spend plenty of energy & engineering resources studying attacks like this one, and figuring out how to reduce risk exposure.

But what about your startup in particular? How can we learn from these types of outages? There are a number of ways that I outline below.

Also: How do we lock down systems from disgruntled engineers?

3. What are your dependencies?

After an outage like the Dyn one, it’s an opportunity to survey your systems. Take stock of what technologies, software & services you rely on. This is something your ops team can & likely wants to do.

What components does your stack rely on? Which versions are hardest to upgrade? What hardware or services do you rely on? Which APIs do you call out to? Which steps or processes are still manual?

Related: The myth of five nines

4. Put your eggs in many baskets

Awareness around your dependencies, helps you see where you may need to build in redundancy. Can you setup a second cloud provider for DR? Can you use an alternate API to get data, when your primary is out? For which dependencies are your hands tied? Where are your weaknesses?

Read: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

5. Don’t assume five nines

The gold standard in technology & startup land has been 5 nines availability. This is the SLA we’re expected to shoot for. I’ve argued before (see: myth of five nines) that it’s rarely ever achieved. Outages like this one, bringing hours long downtime, kill hour 5 nines promise for years. That’s because 5 nines means only 5 ¬Ĺ minutes downtime per year!

Better to be realistic that outages can & will happen, manage & mitigate, and be realistic with your team & your customers.

Also: Is AWS a patient that needs constant medication?

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Is a dangerous anti-ops movement gaining momentum?

devops divide

I was talking with a colleague recently. He asked me …

What do you think of the #no-ops movement that seems to be gaining ground? How is it related to devops?

It’s an interesting question. With technologies like lambda & docker containers, the role & responsibilities & challenges of operations are definitely changing quickly.

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The tooling & automation stacks that are available now are great. ¬†Groundbreaking. Paradigm shifting. ¬†But there’s another devops story that’s buried there waiting to be heard…

1. What is ops anyway?

What exactly is operations anyway? Charity Majors wrote an amazing piece – WTF is operations which I highly recommend reading.

At root, operations is about providing a safe nest where software can live. From incubation, to birth, then care & feeding to maturity.

Also: Why Reddit CTO Martin Weiner wants a boring tech stack

2. Is Noops possible?

The trend to a #NOops movement I think is a dangerous one.

At first glance this might seem reflexive on my part. ¬†After all I’ve specialized in operations & databases for years. ¬†But I think there’s something more insidious here.

Devs are often presiding over the first wave of software. That’s the initial period of perhaps five years, where frenetic product development is happening. ¬†After those years have passed, early innovators are long gone, and an OPS team is trying to keep things running, and patch where necessary. ¬†This is when more conservative thinking, and the perspective of fewer moving parts & a simpler infrastructure seems so obvious. ¬†All the technical debt is piled up & it’s hard to find the front door.

There’s an interesting article The ops identity crisis by Susan Fowler that I’d recommend for further reading.

Related: Is zero downtime even possible on RDS?

3. The dev mandate

I’ve sat in on teams talking about getting rid of ops & how it’ll mean more money to spend on devs etc. ¬†It’s always a surprising sentiment to hear.

I would argue that developers have a mandate to build production & functionality that can directly help customers. This is in essence a mandate for change. Faster, more agile & responsive means quicker to market & more responsive to changes there.

Read: Five reasons to move data to Amazon Redshift

4. The ops mandate

I’ve also heard the other camp, ops talking about how stupid & short sighted devs can be. Deploying the lastest shiny toys, without operational or long term considerations being thought of.

The ops mandate then is for this longer term view. How can we keep systems stable at 2am in the morning? How can we keep them chugging along after five or more years?

This great article Happiness is a boring stack by Jason Kester really sums up the sentiment. The sure & steady, standard & reliable stack wins the operations test every time.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

5. Coming together

Ultimately dev & ops have different mandates. ¬†One for change & new product features, the other against change, for long term stability. ¬†It’s about striking a balance between the two.

It’s always a dance. That’s why dev & ops need to come together. That’s really what devops is all about.

For some further reading, I found Julia Evans’ piece What Is Devops to be an excellent read.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

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