How do you hire the best talent in a competitive marketplace?

via GIPHY

Kapwing, a scrappy startup out of SF wrote this excellent piece how they hired 10 employees in the very tight bay area market. It caught my attention because the demand for great people has never been higher.

Join 35,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Here are the ways they found great people…

1. Events

Meetups are always an excellent way to find great people. Tech networking, can be one part selling your ideas, projecting your prowess or career building for your own people. And meanwhile career forward, self-actuated employees are scoping you out too.

Check out: What did Matt Ranney discover scaling Uber to 1000 microservices?

2. Friend referrals

Connecting through your own people is always a good way to find talent. These referrals are also great because you already have a handle on the hires real-world experience and personality. Good for everybody.

Also: What happened when I offered advice outside my pay grade?

3. Press

As your startup grows, you get some press in TechCrunch or ReCode. This generates some household recognition in the tech community, or posts on HackerNews. From there you get inbound requests because smart people are on the prowl for a great company. Done & done!

Related: Can humility help you in your career?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

What do senior engineers do differently?

via GIPHY

I recently stumbled up on this piece at Pivotal, The art of interrupting software engineers. It caught my attention because i like to read from a different vantage from my own.

What is it like to interrupt us?

Join 35,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

What I really got from the article though, was how different types of engineers will think about problems differently.

1. Under the hood

For junior engineers who are still a bit green, and new to working in industry, they’re downward facing. Focusing solely under the hood, they may not see how their work contributes to a product, or how it fits into the overall picture for the business.

“When asked about their progress on a story, they would make an effort to ensure I understood what was happening under the hood and what tradeoffs they were facing using a vocabulary I was familiar with. ”

For her it was technical competence that stood out – or at least not the only thing – but rather how they were strategizing, and communicating their problems, challenges, and progress.

Read: What happened when I offered advice outside my pay grade?

2. Communicate discoveries

A more intermediate engineer, would sometimes anticipate & communicate better.

“In some cases, those engineers would come to me before I even had a chance to enter the paranoid zone and give me a simple explanation of how the team had learned new information since they first estimated the complexity of a story. ”

She is also speaking of situational awareness. So not working in a vacuum, communicating & incorporating that new information as it becomes available.

Read: What did Matt Ranney discover scaling Uber to 1000 microservices?

3. Anticipate in advance

Senior engineers, she says would really stay ahead of the curve. They were even anticipating what might be a roadblock for her product delivery.


“Some of the very best practitioners would ask me in advance how urgently we should deliver a particular user story and what we were ready to give up in order to ship faster.”

Weighing tradeoffs, and prioritizing is a huge factor in velocity. If you can tame that beast, you’ll go very far indeed!

Related: Can humility help you in your career?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is there a serious skills shortage around devops space?

via GIPHY

As devops adoption picks up pace, the signs are everywhere. Infrastructure as code once a backwater concept, and a hoped for ideal, has become an essential to many startups.

Why might that be?

Join 37,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

My theory is that devops enables the business in a lot of profound ways. Sure it means one sysadmin can do much more, manage a fleet of servers, and support a large user base. But it goes much deeper than that.





Being able to standup your entire dev, qa, or production environment at the click of the button transforms software delivery dramatically. It means it can happen more often, more easily, and with less risk to the business. It means you can do things like blue/green deployments, rolling out featues without any risk to the production environment running in parallel.

What kind of chops does it take?

Strong generalist skills

For starters you’ll need a pragmatist mindset. Not fanatical about one technology, but open to the many choices available. And as a generalist, you start with a familiarity with a broad spectrum of skills, from coding, troubleshooting & debugging, to performance tuning & integration testing.

Stir into the mix good operating system fundamentals, top to bottom knowledge of Unix & Linux, networking, configuration and more. Maybe you’ve built kernels, compiled packages by hand, or better yet contributed to a few open source projects yourself.

You’ll be comfortable with databases, frontend frameworks, backend technologies & APIs. But that’s not all. You’ll need a broad understanding of cloud technologies, from GCP to AWS. S3, EC2, VPCs, EBS, webservers, caching servers, load balancing, Route53 DNS, serverless lambda. Add to all of that programmable infrastructure through CloudFormation or Terraform.

Related: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

Competent programmer

Although as a devop you probably won’t be doing frontend dev, you’ll need some cursory understanding of those. You should be competent at Python and perhaps Nodejs. Maybe Ruby & bash scripts. You’ll need to understand JSON & Yaml, CloudFormation & Terraform if you want to deliver IAC.

Related: Does a 4-letter-word divide dev & ops?

Strong sysadmin with ops mindset

These are fundamental. But what does that mean? Ops mindset is born out of necessity. Having seen failures & outages, you prioritize around uptime. A simpler stack means fewer moving parts & less to manage. Do as Martin Weiner would suggest & use boring tech.

But you’ll also need to reason about all these components. That’ll come from dozens of debug & troubleshooting sessions you’ll do through years of practice.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

Understand build systems & deployment models

Build systems like CircleCI, Jenkins or Gitlab offer a way to automate code delivery. And as their use becomes more widespread knowing them becomes de rigueur. But it doesn’t end there.

With deployments you’ll have a lot to choose from. At the very simplest a single target deploy, to all-at-once, minimum in service and rolling upgrades. But if you have completely automated your dev, qa & prod infra buildout, you can dive into blue/green deployments, where you make a completely knew infra for each deploy, test, then tear down the old.

Related: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

Personality to communicate across organization

I think if you’ve made it this far you will agree that the technical know-how is a broad spectrum of modern computing expertise. But you’ll also need excellent people skills to put all this into practice.

That’s because devops is also about organizational transformation. Yes devs & ops have to get up to speed on the tech, but the organization has to get on board too. Many entrenched orgs pay lip service to devops, but still do a lot of things manually. This is out of fear as much as it stands as technical debt.

But getting past that requires evangelizing, and advocating. For that a leader in the devops department will need superb people skills. They’ll communicate concepts broadly across the organization to win hearts and minds.

Related: Will Microservices just die already?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Some irresistible reading for March – outages, code, databases, legacy & hiring

via GIPHY

I decided this week to write a different type of blog post. Because some of my favorite newsletters are lists of articles on topics of the day.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Here’s what I’m reading right now.

1. On Outages

While everyone is scrambling to figure out why part of the internet went down … wait is S3 is part of the internet, really? While I’m figuring out if it is a service of Amazon, or if Amazon is so big that Amazon *is* the internet now…

Let’s look at s3 architectural flaws in depth.

Meanwhile Gitlab had an outage too in which they *gasp* lost data. Seriously? An outage is one thing, losing data though. Hmmm…

And this article is brilliant on so many levels. No least because Matthew knows that “post truth” is a trending topic now, and uses it his title. So here we go, AWS Service status truth in a post truth world. Wow!

And meanwhile the Atlantic tries to track down where exactly are those Amazon datacenters?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. On Code

Project wise I’m fiddling around with a few fun things.

Take a look at Guy Geerling’s Ansible on a Mac playbooks. Nice!

And meanwhile a very nice deep dive on Amazon Lambda serverless best practices.

Brandur Leach explains how to build awesome APIs aka ones that are robust & idempotent

Meanwhile Frans Rosen explains how to 0wn slack. And no you don’t want this. 🙂

Related: 5 surprising features in Amazon’s serverless Lambda offering

3. On Hiring & Talent

Are you a rock star dev or a digital nomad? Take a look at the 12 best international cities to live in for software devs.

And if you’re wondering who’s hiring? Well just about everyone!

Devs are you blogging? You should be.

Looking to learn or teach… check out codementor.

Also: why did dev & ops used to be separate job roles?

4. On Legacy Systems

I loved Drew Bell’s story of stumbling into home ownership, attempting to fix a doorbell, and falling down a familiar rabbit hole. With parallels to legacy software systems… aka any older then oh say five years?

Ian Bogost ruminates why nothing works anymore… and I don’t think an hour goes by where I don’t ask myself the same question!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

5. On Databases

If you grew up on the virtual world of the cloud, you may have never touched hardware besides your own laptop. Developing in this world may completely remove us from understanding those pesky underlying physical layers. Yes indeed folks containers do run in “virtual” machines, but those themselves are running on metal, somewhere down the stack.

With that let’s not forget that No, databases are not for containers… but a healthy reminder ain’t bad..

Meanwhile Larry’s mothership is sinking…(hint: Oracle) Does anybody really care? Now’s the time to revisit Mike Wilson’s classic The difference between god and Larry Ellison.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Are career promotions like marriage… appealing until your first divorce?

surge pricing engineers

I was recently flipping through an interesting email list. It’s focused for tech leaders, managers & startup entrepreneurs. An HR team lead posted asking about “promotion paths” for engineers.

While I have an intuitive grasp of what engineers at those different levels look like, I’m having trouble making those concrete.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

It struck me how antiquated the whole “career ladder” concept is. Work one job for 20-30 years. It feels like the fairytale of dating that leads safely to marriage. It all seems like a wonderful plan until it fizzles out, employees get jaded, they start seeing the real money being paid elsewhere, and begin looking around.

1. Talent in short supply

I’m not a CTO.  I should preface with that bit.  I’m a consultant.  That said I’ve worked in the tech industry for 20 years, so I have a bit of an opinion here.

Going to meetups, startup industry & pitch events. They’re all like a feeding frenzy. There are more companies hiring now than I remember back in 1998 & 1999. It’s just crazy.

Angel List says 18,000 companies are hiring right now. What about Made In NYC? That shows 735 jobs. And of course there’s Ycombinator who is hiring April 2016, which posts every other month. It has 720 comments as of this writing.

Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

2. Are salary jumps always larger through external promotion?

I’ve seen a pattern repeated over & over.  An outside firm offers more money & grabs the talent, or the talent gets restless, starts looking & finds they get a bigger bump in salary by leaving, than by internal promotions.  

I don’t know why this is, but it seems almost universal that salary jumps are larger from outside firms, than internally through promotion.  

Also: Why devops talent is so hard to find

3. Building a better ladder

There are great posts on engineering ladders like this one from Neo and also this one from RTR. Also take a look at this one at Artsy. And of course somebody has to go and put theirs up on github. 🙂

All the titles & internal shuffling in the world aren’t going to hide industry pay for long.  When an employee gets wise to their career & the skills marketplace, they’ll eventually learn that title does not equal compensation.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck?

4. Building a better culture

In a pricey city like New York, the only thing that seems a counterweight to this is phenomenal culture, chance to build something cool & be surrounded by coworkers you love.  To be sure bouncing around you get less of this. Companies like Etsy comes to mind. According to glassdoor companies like Airbnb, Hubspot & facebook also fit the bill.

Read: 8 questions to ask an aws expert

5. Surge pricing for engineers?

Alternatively to better ladders & promotions, perhaps what Uber did for taxi driving would make sense for hiring engineers too. Let the freelancing phenomenon grow even bigger!

Perhaps we need surge pricing for engineers. That way the very best really do get rewarded the most. Let the marketplace work it’s magic.

Also: When you have to take the fall

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Are top candidates evaluating your startup?

Editor & writer in friendly dialog

I work for a lot of startups. Many ask me for referrals. I play matchmaker when I can. But as the market continues to heat up, the demand for top talent is reaching a boiling point.

Join 29,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. It’s a sellers market

That means folks with technical skills across the spectrum are very indemand. How in demand? Check Angellist, Made In NY or Indeed.com. From SRE’s to full stack developers, devops & automation experts to DBAs. Java, Ruby, Python, PHP, node.js, and of course design skills too.

I was speaking with a recruiter just today, and heard the same refrain…

Top candidates are evaluating us just as we are evaluating you.

That means firms must go the extra mile to stand out, and draw in the best talent.

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

2. Open the glassdoor

That’s right, manage your social media presence. Sites like Glass Door provide forums where employees past & present can discuss the day-to-day work environment. This gives prospects a chance to peer behind the curtain.

Other social media can be avenues too, from Facebook to Twitter. Having someone on staff that monitors online reputation can be crucial.

Related: Are SQL Databases dead?

3. Host a tech blog & meetups

A lot of top firms have great tech blogs. Truth be told many are dormant as demands of the day trump these outward facing initiatives. But they also put a face on the technical side of working for a firm. What problems are they solving? How cutting edge is their team?

Meetups are also a limitless forum. Smart minds will be mixing, your company brand will be spreading. Hosting technical discussions brings your firm front & center in multiple ways. It also brings possible new hires to your living room.

Read: Is high availability a myth?

4. Show warmth & transparency

I know everybody loves to grill candidates at interviews. But interviewees should be schooled on politeness & how to give a pleasant interview.

I remember one interview where I faced off with four other engineers at a round table. As the discussion unfolded, each aimed shots in succession, almost rapid fire at me. It was not only intimidating, but frustrating. Needless to say it made me a stronger more resilient interviewer, but it’s not a great way to welcome great talent. Buyer beware!

Also: The chaos theory of cloud scalability

5. Show me the money

I know I know, for engineers it’s not all about the money. Or is it? Truth be told compensation is always something prospects will weigh. Equity is fine, for what it is. But it’s a promise into the future.

More senior talent who have been through a few startups or even dot-com 1.0, may be a bit more dubious of abstract compensation. In the end competitive real dollars will speak volumes.

Also: Is upgrading Amazon RDS like a shit-storm that will not end?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is there a devops talent gap?

jenkins_docker

New programming languages & services are being invented at a staggering pace. Hosting is changing, networking is changing, race to market is quickening.

But what does all of this mean to the search for talent? Who understands all these components? Who is an expert in any one?

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. That new car smell

We all remember that time. You know when you drove out of the dealership with your brand new wheels. Driving down the road, you feel on top of the world. You start dreaming of all the fun times you’ll have in your new car. For days and weeks afterward you walk out to your car, open the door & sit inside. It all feels special. You kind of hang out there for a few minutes enjoying the smell before you drive off. Right?

Let’s be vigilant to remember the same thing happens, or rather is happeing in technology all the time. As we automate our infrastructures with Ansible, Puppet & Chef, deploy continuous integration with Jenkins, Travis or Codeship, we should give pause. Each of these tools has it’s own syntax, it’s own bugs, it’s own community, it’s own speed of development & change, it’s own life.

Also: Does a four letter word divide dev & ops?

2. A lot of rushing

Google tells me the synonyms of agile are, nimble, lithe, supple & acrobatic. So in a fast moving world it’s no wonder agile is so big. Anything that allows us to respond to customers quicker & evolve our product faster is a good thing. Yes it is.

Over the years I’ve worked with a lot of clients & customers. Some right out of the gates are in a hurry. There is a sense of urgency even from the initial meeting. Although not in every case, sometimes these are the sign of the perpetually late. They end up throwing money around, throwing technology around, and all in a desperate attempt to plug a leaking ship.

In our race to automate & remain agile & nimble, we should also consider the future. Lets attempt to find a balance & consider future implications of technology decisions & choices.

Read: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Hosting, what’s that?

For many of the startups I work with today, they’ve never deployed on anything but Amazon. There was no rack of computers in a closet & a T1 line, circa 1997. There was no rackspace hosted servers or a colo in New Jersey circa 2005. Right from the beginning it was all on-demand computing.

This shift has surely brought a lot of benefit. But no one can argue it isn’t still very new. And with newness there is a learning curve. And bugs & surprises.

Related: Does a devop need to practice the art of resistance?

4. More complexity in troubleshooting

The wild ride really begins when you’re troubleshooting performance problems. Running your database on RDS you say? How the heck do I get to the terminal and run “top”? Can I do an iostat?

And what does iostat output really mean in multi-tenant Amazon, where your disk is an EBS volume across an unknown & unfriendly network. Who knows why it just slowed to a crawl, then sped up dramatically a few minutes later.

Even fetching the relevant logfile can be complicated. For all the problems the cloud eliminates, it sure introduces a few of it’s own. And who is the expert, and how to find them?

Read this: When fat fingers take down your database

5. More tech, fewer experts

I asked the question a few weeks back Do todays startups require assembly of a lot of parts that no one really understands?.

I’ve taken to browsing the stacks at the lovely StackShare site lately. There you can see what some of the top startups are using for their technology stacks. Docker, Yammer, Yelp, Stripe, Vine, Spotify & Stack Overflow are all there today.

There are new message queues like NSQ & programming languages like Markdown, Coffeescript & Clojure. Even Java. Are people still building web apps in Java. No please no!

While it’s wonderful to see such an explosion of innovation, I look at this from an operations perspective. In five years, when the first & second wave of developers at your startup have left, picture yourself trying to find talent in a long since out-of-fashion language like Dart or Swift. What’s more how do you untangle the mess you’ve now built?

Check this: Is the SQL database dead?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Best of hiring posts on scalable startups

strawberries

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Why I write about hiring

I’ve worked as a consultant for almost twenty years. Technology & professional services are pretty far removed from hiring, so why would I write about it?

As it turns out, finding projects, working with clients, and selling your skills & solutions has quite a lot in common to do with hiring.

As a services consultant, you’re more often a peer to technology directors & CTOs, while hiring for traditional roles is more of a boss employee relationship.

Recruiters

I’ve run into a lot of recruiters & hr folks over the years. Usually it means I’m talking to the wrong folks, as they’re gatekeepers & not decision makers. I wrote Why I don’t work with recruiters after some ups & downs.

Still they’re all a fact of life, and each of us has a role to play. So let’s play fair!

Games

I’ve always wondered, Is Hiring a numbers game? That is does it bend more to persistence & throwing spagetti at the wall, or deliberate, precision searches?

MySQL interview

If you’re looking for a database expert, I put together
Top MySQL DBA interview questions and then another one
Advanced MySQL DBA Interview questions.

These are helpful not just to candidates, but to hiring managers, hr, recruiters & everyone in between.

Mythical talent

Since as far back as I can remember, DBAs have been in short supply. In the 90’s I was doing primarily Oracle work. There were never enough technical dbas. Many came from business backgrounds, and didn’t have operating system & hardware fundamentals.

As startups shifted to open source databases in droves during the 00’s, the situation became even worse. I wrote about
The mythical mysql dba – where can we find one?

Will NoSQL databases continue the same trend?

Hire a developer

With a little light humor, we throw some opinions into the fray around hiring devs with How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck.

As devops gains momentum, some see peace between the old-school silos of developers & operations. Some see the need for ops being supplanted by developers. We have some opinions too.

AWS Interview

Are you looking for an Amazon Web Services expert, who knows how to scale in the cloud? Devops & automation also on your mind? Check out
8 Questions to ask an amazon ec2 expert.

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

NYC Tech Firms Are Hiring – Map

Made In NY - Startups Hiring

If you haven’t noticed how much the NYC tech scene has grown recently, I’m afraid you’ve been hiding under a rock. It’s simply incredible.

Take a look at Mapped In NY a google maps mashup of the growing list popularized by the NY Tech Meetup called Made In New York.

Join 5000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

[mytweetlinks]

Having been around during the first dot-com boom back in the late 1990’s this is even more exciting to see. Despite the recession, New York’s economy is truly thriving!

[quote]
New York’s Startup scene is truly thriving with a whopping 1263 firms, many of which are hiring.
[/quote]

Why is database administration talent in short supply? They are the Mythical MySQL DBAs

Also take a look at: Why Generalists are Better at Scaling the Web

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Here’s a sample

Hacking Job Search – Three Meaty Ideas

Also find the author on twitter @hullsean.

Demand for talented engineers has never been higher. It is in fact the dirty little secret of the startup industry, that there are simply not enough qualified folks to fill the positions.

What this means for you is that you have a lot of options. What it means for a hiring manager is that you will have to work even harder to find the right candidate. Just going to a recruiter isn’t enough. Use your network, go to meetups, follow Gary’s Guide daily.

Also check out our Mythical MySQL DBA piece where we talk about the shortage of DBAs and operations folks.

Further if you’ve dabbled in freelance or independent consulting, I wrote an interesting an in depth look at Why do people leave consulting. Understanding this can help avoid it in your own career, or avoid your resources leaving for better shores.

Find us on twitter @hullsean and linkedin where we share content and ideas everyday!

1. Build your reputation

As they say, your reputation precedes you. So start building it now. Fulltime or freelance, you want to be known.

Speaking, yes you can do it. Start with some small meetups, volunteer to speak on a topic. A ten person room is easier than 30, 50 or 100. Once you have a couple under your belt, fill out a CFP for Velocity, OSCon or some software developers conference. There are many.

Blog – if you’re not already doing so you should. Start with once a week. Comment on industry topics, controversial ideas, or engineering know-how. Prospects can look at this and learn a lot more than from a business card.

Write a book, yes you can. It may sound impossible, but the truth is that publishers are always looking for technical writers. Pick a topic near and dear to you. It’ll also give you endless material for your blog.

Go to meetups, you really need to be getting out there and networking. Get some Moo Business Cards and start working on your elevator pitch!

Social media – being active here helps your blog, and helps people find you. Twitter is a great place to do this. Interact with colleagues and startup founders, VCs and more. If you’re a hiring manager or CTO, you may find great programmers and devops this way.

We also wrote a more in-depth article Consulting and Freelance 101. It’s a three part guide with a lot of useful nugets.

Also take a look at our MySQL DBA Interview Guide which is as helpful to devops and DBAs as it is to managers hiring them!

[quote]
Above all else, build your network & your reputation. It will put you in front of more people as a person, not a commodity or a resume in a pile of hundreds.
[/quote]

2. Qualify prospects

You definitely don’t want to take the first offer you get, and managers don’t want to hire the first candidate that comes along. You want two or three to choose from. Best way to do this is to have options.

If you’re a candidate, network or work through your colleagues. When you do get a lead, be sure you’re speaking to an economic buyer. If you’re not you’ll need to try to find that person who actually signs the checks. They are the ones who ultimately make the decision, so you want to sell yourself to them.

Get a Deposit – I know I know, if it’s your first freelance job, you don’t want to scare them off. Or maybe you do? The only prospects that would be scared off by this are ones who may not pay down the line. Dragging their feet with a deposit can also mean bureaucratic red tap, so be patient too.

Sara Horowitz has an excellent book Freelancers bible, we recommend you grab a copy right now!

Commodity You Are Not so don’t sell yourself as one. What do I mean? You are not an interchangeable part. You have special skills, you have personality, you have things that you’re particularly good at. These traits are what you need to focus on. The dime-a-dozen skills should sit more in the background.

You’ll also need to price and package your services. We talked about this in-depth in Consulting Essentials – Getting the Business.

We also think there is a reason Why Generalists are better at scaling the web.

3. Play the numbers game

For hiring managers this doesn’t mean working through recruiters that might be bringing subpar talent, it means networking through industry events, meetups, startup pitch and venture capital events. There are a few every single day in NYC and there’s no reason not to go to some of them.

For candidates, be eyeing a few different companies, and following up on more than one prospect. You should really think of this process as an integral and enjoyable part of your career, not a temporary in between stage. Networking doesn’t happen overnight, but from a regular process of meeting and engaging with colleagues over years and years in an industry.

At the end of the day hiring is a numbers game so you should play it as such. Keep searching, and always be watching the horizon.

Read this far? Grab our Scalable Startups for more tips and special content.