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I was sifting through my project & progress reports from former clients today. Something struck me loud and clear. It seems 4 out of 5 of them don’t implement VPC best practices.

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Which begs the question again and again, is the service just too damn complicated? I wrote about this topic before… Is aws a bit too complex for most or at least smaller dev teams?

1. No private subnets

What are those you ask? I really hope you’re not asking that.

The best practices way to deploy on amazon is using a vpc. This provides a logical grouping. You could have a dev, stage and prod vpc, and perhaps a utility one for other more permanent services.

Within that VPC, you want to have everything deployed in one or more private subnets. These are each mapped to a specific AZ in that region. The AZ mapps to a physical datacenter, a single building within that region. These private subnets have *NO route to the internet*.

How do you reach resources in the private subnet? You must be coming from the public subnet deployed within that same VPC. All the routing rules enforce this. The two types of resources that would be deployed in public subnet: load balancer for 80/443 traffic, and a jump or bastion box for ssh.

Read: How can 1% of something equal nothing?

2. Security groups with all ports open

Another thing that I see more often than you might guess is all ports open by some wildcard rule. *BAD*. We all know it’s bad, but it happens. And then it gets forgotten. We see developers doing it as a temporary fix to get something working and forget to later plug up the hole.

Even for security groups that don’t have this problem, they often allow port 22 from anywhere on the internet (0.0.0.0). This is unnecessary and rather reckless. Everyone should be coming from known source IPs. This can be an office network, or it can be some other trusted server on the internet. Or a block of IPs that you’ll always have assigned.

And of course don’t have your database port open. MySQL and Postgres don’t have particularly great protections here.

Related: Is Fred Wilson right about dealing in an honest, direct and transparent way?

3. No flowlogs enabled

Flowlogs allow you to log things at the packet level. Want to know about failed ssh attempts? Log that. What to know about other ports? Log that too.

If you are funneling all your connections through a jump box, then you can just enable flowlogs then you can configure your vpc flowlogs monitoring just for that box itself. You may also want to watch what’s happening with the load balancer too.

Flowlogs work at the network interface layer of your VPC, so you’ll need to understand VPCs in depth.

Related: What mistakes did you make when starting as a consultant?

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