What do senior engineers do differently?

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I recently stumbled up on this piece at Pivotal, The art of interrupting software engineers. It caught my attention because i like to read from a different vantage from my own.

What is it like to interrupt us?

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What I really got from the article though, was how different types of engineers will think about problems differently.

1. Under the hood

For junior engineers who are still a bit green, and new to working in industry, they’re downward facing. Focusing solely under the hood, they may not see how their work contributes to a product, or how it fits into the overall picture for the business.

“When asked about their progress on a story, they would make an effort to ensure I understood what was happening under the hood and what tradeoffs they were facing using a vocabulary I was familiar with.ย ”

For her it was technical competence that stood out – or at least not the only thing – but rather how they were strategizing, and communicating their problems, challenges, and progress.

Read: What happened when I offered advice outside my pay grade?

2. Communicate discoveries

A more intermediate engineer, would sometimes anticipate & communicate better.

“In some cases, those engineers would come to me before I even had a chance to enter the paranoid zone and give me a simple explanation of how the team had learned new information since they first estimated the complexity of a story.ย ”

She is also speaking of situational awareness. So not working in a vacuum, communicating & incorporating that new information as it becomes available.

Read: What did Matt Ranney discover scaling Uber to 1000 microservices?

3. Anticipate in advance

Senior engineers, she says would really stay ahead of the curve. They were even anticipating what might be a roadblock for her product delivery.


“Some of the very best practitioners would ask me in advance how urgently we should deliver a particular user story and what we were ready to give up in order to ship faster.”

Weighing tradeoffs, and prioritizing is a huge factor in velocity. If you can tame that beast, you’ll go very far indeed!

Related: Can humility help you in your career?

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What engineering roles are most in demand at startups?

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I was just reading over StackOverflow’s 2017 Developer survey. As it turns out there were some surprising findings.

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One that stood out was databases. In the media, one hears more and more about NoSQL databases like Cassandra, Dynamo & Firebase. Despite all that MySQL seems to remain the most popular database by a large margin. Legacy indeed!

1. Databases

MySQL is still the most popular db by a large margin 56%. Followed by SQL Server 39%, SQLite 27% and Postgres 27%.

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. Most popular language

Javascript sits at number one for Web developers, sysadmins & Data Scientists alike. Followed by SQL.

Read: Are SQL Databases dead?

3. Most popular framework

Node.js at 47%. It’s followed by AngularJS at 44%.

Also: 5 ways to move data to Amazon Redshift

4. Most loved database

Redis sits at number one here at 65%, followed by Postgres & Mongo.

Also: Myth of five nines – why HA is overrated

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5 ways to level up as cloud expert

aws certified

Cloud computing is blowing up! But don’t take my word for it, read this recent NY Times piece: Tech companies clamor to entice cloud computing experts.

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Still don’t believe me? Get on the phone with a recruiter or two. They’ll convince you because they’ve got companies banging down the door looking for talent that is plainly in SHORT SUPPLY. And that’s the supply *you* want to be. ๐Ÿ™‚

Check Gary’s Guide Jobs, or the ever popular Angel List Jobs. There’s also Stack Overflow jobs and many more.

1. Become a book reviewer

You’ve already got a technical background, and want to hone those skills. Take a look at technical book reviewing.

Manning is putting out some excellent technical books these days. Apply here to be a reviewer.

Also take a look at Pragmatic Bookshelf. They are are looking for reviewers too.

In either case you can expect to spend time reading a book chapter by chapter, as it’s written, offer strategic or layout advice, feedback on presentation, comprehension, and edits.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

2. Join an Open Source project

There are millions. Flip through github to some that you’re interested in. Contribute a bug fix or comment, reach out to the project leaders.

Afraid to dive in? Join one of the forums or google discussion groups, and lurk for a while. Ask questions, offer a helping hand!

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

3. Self-paced labs

Online education is blowing up, and for good reason. They get the job done & for the right price!

One of my favorites for AWS Certification is the A Cloud Guru courses. These offer lecture style introduction to all levels of AWS from Sysops Administration, Developer & Solutions Architect to Devops, Lambda & CodeDeploy.

The courses are priced right, and geared directly towards Amazon’s certifications. That helps you focus on the right things.

Amazon also partners with qwiklabs to offer courses geared towards getting certified. There are specific ones for the associate & professional certification, and many others besides.

You’ll need to signup for AWS Activate first, before you can use these qwiklabs. They offer you 80 credits right out of the gate.

For the next two weeks many of the courses are free! One thing I really like is they include a free temporary aws login for the students. That way there’s no risk of deploying infrastructure, and accidentally getting a big bill at the end of the month.

The labs though are more like reading documentation versus a nice video course lecture. So you the student have to do a lot more to get through it.

Read: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

4. Coursera, Khanacademy & Udemy

There’s a free class on Coursera called Startup Engineering by Balaji Srinivasan & Vijay Pande. Some pretty amazon material & lectures in here, and if you’re determined, it’s 12 weeks that will get you going on the right foot!

KhanAcademy has a great many courses on computer programming. Awesome and free stuff here. One particularly interesting is their hour of code. For those hesitant, that’s an easy way to jump in!

There is also udemy, which offers some great material on cloud computing. Notice that the certification courses are the same ones from A-Cloud Guru!

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Interview tests

Apply to jobs. Even if you’re unsure if that is your dream job. Why? Because they often include a test to find out about your technical chops. Diving into these tests is a great way to push your own edge. You may do well, you may not. Learn where your weaknesses are.

I especially like the ones where you’re asked to login to a server, configure some things, write some code, and solve a real problem. Nothing beats a real-world example!

Also: Why dropbox didn’t have to fail?

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Do we need computer science for all?

I was recently digging through AVC, Fred Wilson’s blog. These days it’s where I get most of my tech news. ๐Ÿ™‚ I ran into this AVC Post on Obama’s Computer Science for All initiative. I hadn’t been paying attention to these weekly addresses.

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It’s exciting to see this reach the national stage. Theres’s been a shortage of computer science graduates since the 90’s. In fact it’s only grown.

Computer Science for All

Here’s the full address. It’s short & worth watching.

Also: 5 core pieces of the Amazon cloud to get your project off the ground

Code is everywhere

The president points out that it’s not just at trendy startups & silicon valley that you see code anymore. Car mechanics, nurses & everyone in the new economy touches code. It isn’t an optional skill anymore but rather a basic one.

Related: 5 tech challenges I’m thinking about today

1M unfilled computer science jobs by 2020!

This is an incredible figure. That’s not the number of jobs, but rather the number we’ll be short! That’s right we’ll need a million more graduates than we’ll have.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that by 2020, there’ll be 1 million more jobs in computer-science and related fields than students graduating for them.

While disruption affects a lot of other industries, in high tech skills, the demand is actually exploding!

Read: Is Data your dirty little secret?

Digital divide

Sometimes called a “digital skills gap” or “digital divide”, attention to this problem is sorely needed. Want more? Check out Girls who code or any of the many courses offered at General Assembly or a coding meetup group near you.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

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