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All Blogging Consulting CTO/CIO

What hidden things does a deposit reveal?

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I like this idea of how integration tests in software development show you that everything is working and connected together properly.

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I think it’s interesting to consider how a deposit may serve a similar function across the financial space & contractual space.

1. Alignment across business units

In really small organizations, everyone is in tight communication. Finance knows what engineering is doing. In medium to large organizations, there can be a disconnect. Engineering may be 100% ready to start today, but finance is not ready. In some cases finance may not even know a consultant is being hired. Each case is different.

Some CTOs get this right away, and are already ahead of the request. While others might ask, “Well we’re ready to get going today, do you really need the deposit first? Because that might take some time.”

My thinking is, yes the engineering department is ready, but the organization is *not* completely ready. And it’s better that there be alignment across the organization. Ironing out that alignment, helps avoid other problems later on.

Related: When you have to take the fall

2. Organization or disorganization

Sometimes there is complete alignment, the contract is already ready, and the whole org really is ready to go. In other cases there can be some disfunction. For instance the lawyers have a lot of hoops that want us to jump through, in terms of a contract.

In other cases finance may only cut checks on a certain day of the month, or only pay 30 days after receiving an invoice. There are a lot of different policies. By insisting that we receive a deposit, however small, we iron out these things early.

If the engineering manager or CTO hiring you promises one thing, but finance has a policy against that, you’ll want to know early to avoid misunderstandings.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Trust

The amount of a deposit is really irrelevant. It’s all about getting ducks in a row. Both in terms of what may be required of you the vendor, and what the company’s policies may be when onboarding consultants.

By ironing out these issues early, the customer is showing some faith in you as a vendor. They want you in particular, and will do what they need to, to make it work.

Related: Is AGILE right for fixing performance issues?

4. We want you to rush, but we don’t

I’ve encountered many cases where engineering was “ready” but finance was not. It’s tough. From the perspective of the CTO it may be a moot point to get stuck on.

My thought is to hold the frame of two organizations working together. When the organization has alignment that hiring this engineering resource is a priority, it will get things done that it needs to.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

5. Stress tests or organizational integration tests

In software testing, we have something called an integration test. It might be confirming that a login works, or a certain page can load. Behind the scenes that test requires the database to be running, the queuing system to work, an API call to return successfully, and so on. A lot of moving parts all have to be working for that test to succeed.

In a very real way, a deposit is the financial equivalent of an integration test. It confirms that we’re all aligned in the ways we need to, and are ready to get started.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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All CTO/CIO Devops Scalability

How organizations can move faster with devops – a16z Sonal Chokshi interviews Nicole Forsgren & Jez Humble

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We hear a lot about devops these days, and the promise is temendous. It originally evolved out of Agile operations. But how to get those benefits at *my* organization?

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How do we become a high performing organization, to move faster and build more secure and resilient systems? That’s the $64,000 question!

A16Z strikes again! Andreeson Horowitz’s epic podcast hosts world class guests around all sorts of startup & new technology topics. This week they interview Jez Humble and Nicole Forsgren. They run Dora which is DevOps Research and Assessment, which shows organizations just how to get the advantages of devops in the real world.

Technology does not drive organizational performance

Check out section 16:04 in the podcast…


“the point of distinction comes from how you tie process and culture together technology through devops”

It’s the classic Amazon model. They’re running hundreds of experiments in production at any one time!

Related: The 4 letter word dividing dev and ops

Day one is short, day two is long

The first interesting quote that caught my attention was at 4:40…


“Day one is when we create all of these systems. Day two is when we deploy to production. We have to deploy and maintain forever and ever and ever. We hope that day two is really long.”

As a long time op, this really really resonates for me. Brownfield deployments, which have already seen a wave of developers finish, and leave, and trying to manage that. Not easy!

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

Mainframes of Kubernetes?

What about tooling? Is that important? Here’s what Jez has to say. Jump to 29:30…


“Implementing those technologies does *not* give you those outcomes. You can achieve those results with Mainframes. Equally you can use Kubernetes, Docker and microservices and not achieve those outcomes.”

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

Reducing Friction

Fast forward to timecode 28:45…


“Conways Law: Organizations which design systems are constrained to produce designs that are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.”

ie your software code looks like the shape of organization itself, and how we communicate. Super interesting. 🙂

Related: 6 devops interview questions

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters