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All Cloud Computing CTO/CIO Devops

Why maintenance sometimes a forgotten art?

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Just finished reading the excellent
Why do people neglect maintenance?.

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With a wide ranging discussion, from cultural myths to cognitive biases, there are a lot of reasons why your organization may not be giving maintenance the attention it deserves.

Here are some thoughts…

1. Weighing short & long term tradeoffs

When looking at maintenance problems, we sometimes must weigh easy to implement quick fixes, versus the better though weightier longer term fix.

Often the longer term fix requires more downtime, and so is a harder pill to swallow. So sometimes taking that medicine is put off till later. Weighing how much that could cost you is not easy. But that is often the reality of maintenance and ops teams.

Read: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

2. Keeping it sexy

One interesting point they make in the article is around the culture of innovation. Since building new products and changing the world is sexy, some how the day-to-day realities of managing and maintaining that after delivery can take a back seat.

Just as we prioritize creating new features, and building a changed product, we must always weigh the costs of such change. As I wrote in the four letter word dividing dev and ops, different team members have different mandates. And that’s important.

While developers are mandated with bringing new features to life, ops are mandated with keeping things running at 4am. Software updates, maintenance, outages are what the ops team is worried about.

Related: Does Amazon have a dirty little secret?

3. Status symbols – dev versus ops

There is some interesting discussion by Andy Jess & Lee about how these different job roles can be viewed as low or high status in an organization.

In my article why we need techops I mention some of this narrative. Once at a keynote, I heard a sales guy advocate a product that would obviate your needing to hire ops. Yep, more money to hire Devs!

On the flip side at ops and DBA conferences, I’ve heard over and over the story of “some idiot developer that took down our production systems…”

You get it on both sides. When will teams ever work together?

Read: The art of resistance – when you have to be the bad guy

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All CTO/CIO Database Operations Devops

Is maintenance as sexy as innovation?

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A recent NYT piece on our aging american infrastructure got me thinking. It seems that roads, bridges, airports & city sewer systems are all in need of repair. Sadly as budgets to maintain these systems in good repair are often short, they become larger problems to fix as their status becomes critical.

Join 37,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

“Americans have an impoverished and immature conception of technology, one that fetishizes innovation as a kind of art and demeans upkeep as a mere drudgery.”

I’m not sure this is an American-only phenomenon. However I do see it a lot with technology companies & startups.

1. Do we have to manage ops in the cloud?

The cloud has enabled infrastructure automation in some pretty phenomenal ways. Code pipelines can deliver changes to a repo, through automated unit testing, and out to customers all without human intervention. This makes teams more agile, and ultimately businesses faster & more profitable.

We might be distracted enough to stop worrying about operations altogether. After all Amazon knows how to manage broken servers & alert us right? I write do we have to manage operations in the cloud previously, as this sentiment seems to be growing.

Modern applications have a ton of interdependencies. Even with decent integration testing, the full stack is complex, and requires monitoring. Co-tenancy can complicate your performance tuning efforts as neighboring customers may directly affect your application. Third party services may be delivered from smaller or less experienced companies, whose SLA may be limiting besides. And hey if Amazon goes down, I can just tell my customers it was their fault, right?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. Do you know Dustin Moskovitz?

Chances are I’m guessing you’ll say no. He was part of the original Facebook team alongside Zuckerberg. You don’t know his name? He had the sexy job of, you guessed it maintenance! He was the operations guy. Did he write the application code? More than likely he knew that code very well as he had to fix & maintain it. Along with the infrastructure to scale & support Facebook’s massive growth.

Read: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams? The growing demand for Cloud SRE

3. Is a little technical debt ok?

Ward Cunningham has an excellent interview about technical debt. Is a little bit ok? Maybe. But each amount is kicking the can down the road. As the NYT article on maintenance makes clear, you can move the responsibility on to the next administration, the next term, or someone else, but eventually you’ll have a critical problem on your hands, which will be much more expensive to fix.

Related: How to build an operational datastore on Amazon Redshift with S3

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters