What’s the luckiest thing that’s happened in your career?

via GIPHY

On more than a few occasions I’ve been asked what it’s like working remote. The inevitable followup is wow, you’re lucky. You can call it luck, but I just finished talking to 50 companies, put together proposals for all of them, and 49 said no to remote.

Lucky indeed!

Join 38,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

But to be sure, there have certainly been events that I look back on, that have had a seminal influence on my career. I thought of three. Here they are.

1. I got a newspaper route

Yes it’s true. Way back in the dawn of time, news was delivered on paper, and those would often be delivered to your doorstep, every morning. That and for only pennies.

At the time I think I was ten years old, and I was super excited because I wanted to be part of the world. And this was really the only job you could get at that age. It required a lot of organizing. You had a book with lists of all your customers, you had to keep track of who had paid, and so forth. Some wanted to pay monthly, while others insisted on weekly.

Read: 8 questions to ask an aws expert

I was lucky not only to get the paper route, but to have parents that encouraged me in this way, and could teach me how to be responsible and reliable. Yeah those were super important early lessons.

When I saw that I had a captive audience, it wasn’t long before I was selling incidental services. Do you need your driveway shoveled? I got it. How about mowing your lawn or raking those leaves? Or walking your dog? I spun this into a whole bunch of side businesses.

It was exciting because I was making my own money at such a young age, and felt the lure of self-determination. I loved that feeling.

Also: The art of resistence in advice & consulting

2. Linux happened

In the early 90’s Linux came on the scene. It might seem like a meaningless blip on the radar to you, but to me it was everything. At University I worked in the computer lab, where we were the operations staff. Those systems all ran Unix. So to go home and use a windows box, it was demoralizing.

Then out of nowhere this guy from Finland started building off of Tennenbaum’s book, Minix! I had worked on that at University, so I immediately saw the implications. I mean heck why can’t all that great software run on PCs, it’s just a matter of getting the drivers working. Big vendors didn’t want to do it, but millions of hackers around the world were happy to pickup the mantle.

Related: The 4 letter word dividing devops

From there I build a tower, cobbled together hardware, memory, disk bus. Do you want to go IDE Or SCSI? Better choose a graphics card that is supported if you want to get X11 running on that. And of course an optical mouse so that it really feels like you’re sitting at a sun workstation!

“No one has as much luck around the greens as one who practices a lot.”  
–Chi Chi Rodriguez

To me that was pure magic. I mean from boot up to graphical interface, the entire stack was built by people just like me. And I could look at all of it. So cool! Even better that we were fighting the good fight against Bill Gates & the borg! 🙂

Check out: When clients don’t pay

3. Meeting the $65/hr consultant

This is a funny story too. One of the first jobs I had in NYC was not a consulting gig. It was a small design shop in the late nineties. Their biggest customer was Miramax Films. So they were doing really cutting edge stuff. And a lot of cool tech too. After their lead engineer quite, I became the defacto go-to person for all tech projects. I guess you could say I was CTO of a team of 5.

For one of our projects we needed help. The CEO had won business to do some Oracle development, which I didn’t have a lot of experience in. So he hired a consultant to help out. Very nice guy, a bit older than me. In fact I think he was about as old then as I am today.

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

As he was a smoker, we stepped outside together at one point, and I chatted him up a bit. I was so eager to learn. I don’t recall if he shared his rate or I learned it some other way. But I was shocked and blown away. To me it seemed like an insane amount of money. I remember him saying something to me. “Don’t worry Sean, someday you’ll be consulting too, and making just as much.”

“No one is going to know or care about your failures, and neither should you. All you have to do is learn from them and those around you. [A]ll that matters in business is that you get it right once. Then everyone can tell you how lucky you are.” 
–Mark Cuban

Well I am a very competitive person. I also knew that I was smarter than this guy, but he had a bit more experience than me. So from there I started sniffing around. I talked to recruiters and anyone I knew. Within two weeks, I had gotten an offer for $80/hr. Shortly after that I gave my notice.

I have to thank that guy for challenging the way he did. And I’ve never looked back since!

Related: When you have to take the fall

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Hacking Job Search – Three Meaty Ideas

Also find the author on twitter @hullsean.

Demand for talented engineers has never been higher. It is in fact the dirty little secret of the startup industry, that there are simply not enough qualified folks to fill the positions.

What this means for you is that you have a lot of options. What it means for a hiring manager is that you will have to work even harder to find the right candidate. Just going to a recruiter isn’t enough. Use your network, go to meetups, follow Gary’s Guide daily.

Also check out our Mythical MySQL DBA piece where we talk about the shortage of DBAs and operations folks.

Further if you’ve dabbled in freelance or independent consulting, I wrote an interesting an in depth look at Why do people leave consulting. Understanding this can help avoid it in your own career, or avoid your resources leaving for better shores.

Find us on twitter @hullsean and linkedin where we share content and ideas everyday!

1. Build your reputation

As they say, your reputation precedes you. So start building it now. Fulltime or freelance, you want to be known.

Speaking, yes you can do it. Start with some small meetups, volunteer to speak on a topic. A ten person room is easier than 30, 50 or 100. Once you have a couple under your belt, fill out a CFP for Velocity, OSCon or some software developers conference. There are many.

Blog – if you’re not already doing so you should. Start with once a week. Comment on industry topics, controversial ideas, or engineering know-how. Prospects can look at this and learn a lot more than from a business card.

Write a book, yes you can. It may sound impossible, but the truth is that publishers are always looking for technical writers. Pick a topic near and dear to you. It’ll also give you endless material for your blog.

Go to meetups, you really need to be getting out there and networking. Get some Moo Business Cards and start working on your elevator pitch!

Social media – being active here helps your blog, and helps people find you. Twitter is a great place to do this. Interact with colleagues and startup founders, VCs and more. If you’re a hiring manager or CTO, you may find great programmers and devops this way.

We also wrote a more in-depth article Consulting and Freelance 101. It’s a three part guide with a lot of useful nugets.

Also take a look at our MySQL DBA Interview Guide which is as helpful to devops and DBAs as it is to managers hiring them!

[quote]
Above all else, build your network & your reputation. It will put you in front of more people as a person, not a commodity or a resume in a pile of hundreds.
[/quote]

2. Qualify prospects

You definitely don’t want to take the first offer you get, and managers don’t want to hire the first candidate that comes along. You want two or three to choose from. Best way to do this is to have options.

If you’re a candidate, network or work through your colleagues. When you do get a lead, be sure you’re speaking to an economic buyer. If you’re not you’ll need to try to find that person who actually signs the checks. They are the ones who ultimately make the decision, so you want to sell yourself to them.

Get a Deposit – I know I know, if it’s your first freelance job, you don’t want to scare them off. Or maybe you do? The only prospects that would be scared off by this are ones who may not pay down the line. Dragging their feet with a deposit can also mean bureaucratic red tap, so be patient too.

Sara Horowitz has an excellent book Freelancers bible, we recommend you grab a copy right now!

Commodity You Are Not so don’t sell yourself as one. What do I mean? You are not an interchangeable part. You have special skills, you have personality, you have things that you’re particularly good at. These traits are what you need to focus on. The dime-a-dozen skills should sit more in the background.

You’ll also need to price and package your services. We talked about this in-depth in Consulting Essentials – Getting the Business.

We also think there is a reason Why Generalists are better at scaling the web.

3. Play the numbers game

For hiring managers this doesn’t mean working through recruiters that might be bringing subpar talent, it means networking through industry events, meetups, startup pitch and venture capital events. There are a few every single day in NYC and there’s no reason not to go to some of them.

For candidates, be eyeing a few different companies, and following up on more than one prospect. You should really think of this process as an integral and enjoyable part of your career, not a temporary in between stage. Networking doesn’t happen overnight, but from a regular process of meeting and engaging with colleagues over years and years in an industry.

At the end of the day hiring is a numbers game so you should play it as such. Keep searching, and always be watching the horizon.

Read this far? Grab our Scalable Startups for more tips and special content.

Opportunity a day – career risk at bay

Free Agent. Stress Test. Avoid Sameness

As the globalization juggernaut rolls on, it continues to create more Detroits. Skills and perspectives quickly become obsolete.

What to do in the face of such change?

[quote]Small fires prevent the big burn[/quote]

So there’s your quick answer. Get the book if you want more!

Some related material: why is it so hard to find a mysql dba?.
Consulting 101 Guide – Finding Business :: Completing Engagements :: Growing business

Your Mentors

On this tour, a free agent needs mentors. Hoffman & Casnocha provide you with plenty from stories & lessons from some of the startup industry’s finest. Jack Dorsey, Mark Andreesen, Cheryl Sandberg, Rick Warren, Paul Graham, Jeff Bezos, Joi Ito and a few of their own running Paypal & Linkedin.

What you’ll love

Each chapter closes with concrete actionable advice. The authors carefully craft marching orders for you in the next day, next week and next month. Go ahead, give them a try.

[quote]Safe is the new risky – Phil Simon[/quote]

An executive summary of Startup of You

1. develop your strengths
– what do you find easy that others find difficult?
– diversify asset mix aka learn new skills

2. plan to be nimble
– pivot as you learn more
– always prepare a lifeboat contingency plan

3. work & develop your network
– hangout with those already on the road
– domain experts, people who know you & smart people

4. hustle for breakout opportunities

5. Embrace baby steps of risk
– bounds of unemployment – shocks that motivate
– adjust your strategy & pivot if need be

What’s next?

Had a taste and want more? If you’re a MySQL DBA we wrote an interview guide. Also check out our Oracle dba interview questions.

Want more? Check out our best of content compilation.

[quote]Only the paranoid survive. – Andy Grove[/quote]

Read this far? Grab our newsletter. We cover all sorts of great topics for free agents, consultants, and those who want to hire them.