Surprising wisdom – thoughts on Ben Horowitz’s new startup tale

I took a recent flight to San Francisco to have meetings with a few startups. Naturally I needed some good reading to immerse myself in for the flight over and back.

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I have to admit, though I’m not a management consultant, I do pickup the big ones from time to time. Good to Great, How to Make Friends & Influence People, The Lean Startup, Innovators Dillemma & Who Moved My Cheese among my favorites.

I’d seen Ben Horowitz’s book “The Hard Thing about Hard Things” in the news. But I also really love the a16z podcast, and although I don’t know a ton about the VC business, I thought it would be a good read.

Boy is that an understatement! The book is so readable & so accessible, there are nuggets of value in there for anyone in the startup world, or building their career, CEO or not!

On the efficient market hypothesis

I had always assumed Adam Smith’s invisible hand was a good theory, almost as scripture. So to see a different perspective on this, and one backed up by real experience. That’s cool.

“No, markets weren’t “efficient” at finding the truth; they were just very efficient at converging on a conclusion — often the wrong conclusion”. p52

What’s more for investors out there, it means good old fashioned investigative work can still turn up gems, that are worth investing in. Word to the wise.

Related: What I learned from David Maister’s book on trust & advising clients.

Questions for interviews

Add this one to your list of great interview questions. And if you’re being interviewed, why not volunteer this as an action plan. Great advice!

“What will you do in your first month on the job?” p122

Related: A review of Eli Pariser’s insightful book The Filter Bubble

On the Freaky Friday management technique

Freaky Friday was a movie way back in the 80’s. In it a mother & daughter are at each others throats, frustrated with the each other. They end up switching places, and quickly learn to sympathize with the other’s plight in life.

Horowitz decided to put this method to use between two of his managers. Pretty ingenious.

“After just one week walking in the other’s moccasins, both executives quickly diagnosed the core issues causing the conflict. They then swiftly acted to implement a simple set of processes that cleared up the combat and got the teams working harmoniously. p253

Related: A review of the Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

On ancient wisdom & hard choices

“In life, everybody faces choices between doing what’s popular, easy, and wrong versus doing what’s lonely, difficult, and right.” p212

Every time you make the hard, correct decision you become a bit more courageous and every time you make the easy, wrong decision you become a bit more cowardly. p213

Boy, can I relate to these bits of wisdom. Running my own business all these years, it hasn’t been easy. There have been ups and downs, and times when people told me to take a different road. But that courage. When you find it, it can be real fuel for you moving forward.

Related: Can a growth mindset help you recover from setbacks – Carol Dweck

On instincts

I realized that embracing the unusual parts of my background would be the key to making it through. It would be those things that would give me unique perspectives and approaches to the business. p276

When I work with entrepreneurs today, this is the main thing that I try to convey. Embrace your weirdness, your background, your instinct. p276

I hadn’t really thought of this, and it’s an interesting point. It may be one of the reasons why customers hire me, that I hadn’t realized. Certainly I can give an original viewpoint. But I think I will try to put this to work in the future.

Related: Startup of You – Reid Hoffman’s great book on career growth

On publicity in ventura capital

This is a curious & fascinating point about the history of venture capital. Ripe for disruption indeed!

Marc discovered that the original venture capital firms in the late 1940s and early ’50s were modeled after the original investment banks such as J.P. Morgan and Rothschild. Those banks also did not do PR for a very specific reason: The banks funded wars—and sometimes both sides of the same war—so publicity was not a good idea. p271

Related: A review of Nicholas Carr’s book The Big Switch – Rewiring the world from Edison to Google

On the Andreesen Horowitz business model

This is pretty cool. Apparently the A16Z business model built a VC firm by helping startup founders in disruptive ways.

We decided to systematize and professionalize the network. p269

They modeled the firm after Michael Ovitz’s Creative Artists Agency. They had managed to “shift the economics of the industry from the corporations to the talent” p270

Related: Deborah Tannen offers us insights on conversation & interruption across the sexes

On forecasting

I guess I instinctively understood this one, but it’s interesting to see it in black and white like that.

You should expect experienced people to be able to forecast their results more accurately than junior people. p250

Related: 5 things I learned from Frans Johansson about innovation from his book Medici Effect

On checking yourself

Keep yourself honest, ask this question.

“It’s a good idea to ask, “What am I not doing?” p52

Related: 5 things I learned from Gif Constable in his book Talking to Humans

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Can daily notes help you work better with clients?


Years ago I was working at a customer for a few weeks. There was some confusion as to what was going on, in terms of progress. Things weren’t moving as quickly as they expected.

After a lot of back and forth, I suggested I could provide detailed notes of what I had done.

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After I put together my in-depth notes the customer was really happy. It seems these notes had highlighted a few problems that they didn’t know about. What’s more they even highlighted some people issues, where communicate was blocked. Whats more the notes underlined what I was doing, and this really improved the customers confidence in the work product.

1. Visibility

Keeping daily notes is a habit I found useful over and over again. If your client or customer comes to you and says, why are we paying $X, you can provide the notes as a detailed explanation of what they have gotten for their money.

Related: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

2. Transparency

Transparency is a door that swings both ways. As I mentioned above it can be great when the customer is not sure how much work was done, or what the bill is for. But it can also highlight things they may not want done. For instance perhaps you were investigating a problem authenticating to a server. You determined that it was an important piece.

When the customer sees this in your notes they may say “Oh we don’t need to deal with that system. Please leave it alone” or they may say “We actually have Rakesh available to help us with that piece, so please communicate with him and he can resolve that”.

Related: When clients don’t pay

3. Trust

Most important of all, keeping detailed notes helps build trust. Many customers, hiring managers & CTOs are not command-line technical. And that’s perfectly normal. However looking over a long list of notes like these provides great insight to them as to what you do from day-to-day.

Do they need to know what every line means? No. But the visibility goes a long long way toward building trust in the consultant client relationship.

Related: 5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

Week 1 April 1 – April 10

Here’s a sample of the kind notes I keep. Actually they cover a ten day period, but that’s because the initial day was towards the end of a week.

Friday April 1st
o coord with Jake on getting started
o dropbox for password, creds & server docs
o reviewing system network diagram
o reviewing techlist excel doc
– techlist
– server list & access
– database access
– projects -old
o reviewing systems access.docx
o testing AWS login credentials
– issue with permissions
– coordinating with Jake on Admin access
o testing AWS creds again
– access to all AWS services
– IAM for seanhull user
– enabling MFA for user
o questions for outgoing op Roger

Sat April 2nd (no hours)

Sun April 3rd (no hours)

Mon April 4th
o coord with Jake to get onboarded
o sending W9 form to Acme Inc.
o setup slack
o plan for today
– review aws servers
– review dg servers
– questions for Roger
– review docs
o coord with Roger on VPN access
– reach out to Larry
– emailed Larry CC Jake
– Larry requests Acme access CC to mgmt
– turns out VPN access isn’t required
– can just whitelist IP inside the relevant security groups
– coord with J, going ahead to add whitelist
o updating Acmemedia-sandbox security group
– trying to reach host, coord with Roger
– asked to drop ssh key onto servers
– asked about .ssh/config file – Did you get from Jake?
– found the AWS PEM folder that I overlooked 🙂
o configuring .ssh/config file
– copying up to
– setting permissions 600 on pem files
– ssh to sandbox successful!!
o adding whitelist to Acmemedia-prod security group
o updating Jake – access is working

Tue April 5th
o coord with Jake on todo list for today
o verifying mysql access
– review security groups
– no whitelisted IPs
– can reach from webserver?
– test db1 MySQL access via webserver, OK
– test db2 MySQL access via webserver OK
o reviewing monitoring system
– testing nagios access
– locating configurations
– reviewing dashboard
– understanding tests
– down system db1 – 108 days – why?
– down system p1 – LB1 sailthru check down for 85 days why?
– down staging – 174 days why?
– emailed nagios questions to Roger
– request to add me to nagios notifications group
o coord with Roger on questions
– nagios setup & stopped checks
– add to admin group
o github access for sandbox details doc
o login to Acmemedia wp
– check list of 25 plugins
– review recent backups on abc (8)
o login to DDD wordpress
– check list of 33 plugins
– review recent backups in abc (8)
o login to EEE wordpress
– check list of 31 plugins
– review recent backups in abc (37)
o login to FFF wordpress
– check list of 35 plugins
– review recent backups in abc (8)
o login to DDD
o login to EEE
o login to FFF
o emailed Roger – request details about Glasgow server
o review various Acme github pages

Also: The art of resistance or when you have to be the bad guy

Wed April 6th
o coord with Jake on todos for today
o reviewing github pages docs on various system processes
– git deployment server page
– git deployment process
– new deploy process Nov 2015
– wiki pages are a bit sparse overall
o tested jenkins login
– found API cache clear
– found varnish cache clear
o understand separation of dev & production
o digging into Jenkins docs
o understanding build process
o tried login to EEEv2 wp login, don’t have pass
– coordinating with Jake on that login
o checking on nfs disk full nagios alert
– can’t reach box
– notified Jake & Roger via slack
– slack with Lester
– yes nfs01 space 90% is normal
– new launch of EEE tomorrow & old stuff will be deleted then
o updating nfs security group
– ssh login working now.
o getting diskspace error on prod04
– messaged Lester, related to EEE launch tonight
o email from Jake – local dev & test environment setups are slow
– very overengineered for simple wordpress site
– not using multisites, so have FOUR SEPARATE setups
– different plugins on each install
– four sets of logins
– four places to update
– four places to test/qa
– migration may be complex based on custom Acme plugins
– shortcodes compatability across four sites
– not using ithemes security plugin
o discuss with Lester on slack
– API is hosted on datagram
– single point of failure for the site currently
– outage there would take the site down
– migrate to AWS using internal loadbalancer & webservers in 2 AZs

Thu April 7th
o call with Jake on EEEv2 launch today
– general observations of Acme sites & architecture
o reviewing
o discuss with Jake
– hosting media files on S3 vs nfs
– using multisite
– using wordpress through API only
– javascript based static site builder
– moving API to amazon EC2
– create slave MySQL db of master MySQL currently in datadotnet
o discuss with Roger
– launch plan
– two vhosts
– simply restart apache to enable switch
– refresh maxCDN after launch
o review EEEv2 deploy steps
– pre-deploy steps
– DNS for
– add vhosts EEEv2.conf
– restart apache
– restart varnish
– clear maxcdn
o verified login to
– API log is in /var/log/httpd/production-access.log
– login as sandy & root
o not able to login to
– tried admin & pass in datagram docs

o meeting onsite with Jake & Roger
– discuss deployment process
– discuss legacy systems
– discuss NFS vs S3 for media files
– discuss plugins & management
– discuss wordpress version upgrade process
– discuss plugin version upgrade process
– discuss Jenkins access, configs, success & error logs
– discuss managing secrets file
– script that takes webserver out of load balancer while apache restarting
o met Rachel, Louis, Lester, Rick, Stuart, Jack

Fri April 8th
o testing Acme stage build
o emailed Roger further questions
– where is secrets file configuration & process
– composer is PHP dependency management
– what are the steps to upgrade plugin only
o summarizing & notes on Acme
o put together steps for complete firedrill
– questions for Roger, requesting help with process
– build webserver with varnish & apache
– should setup separate NFS server
– should use bc it uses API heavily
– setup copy of API server & db
– setup mysql instance for wordpress
– setup amazon cloudfront for content
o outline additional questions for Roger
– how to upgrade plugin only
– composer for php dependency management
– how are secrets files managed & deployed outside developer access
o secrets management
– asked Roger for clarificaiton
o plugin-only installs
– reviewed jenkins configs
– various questions to Roger
– composer:install seems to be the key change (not just deploy which does all?)
– why is STAGING PLUGIN DEPLOY for ORIM different?
o what happens when github account is disabled!!
– jenkins changes for new github deploy account
– capistrano changes?
– any other changes on sandbox
– any other dependencies for Roger github?
o email step-by-step outline to add a plugin
– reviewing steps with Roger
– making sure no missing pieces

Sat April 9th (1 off-hour)
o receiving nagios alert for p1
o emailed Roger, Jake about issue
o slack messaged Jake
o raises question about off-hours coverage

Sun April 10th (2 off-hours)

o p1 still throwing errors
o coordinating with Lester & Ralph on Slack
– reiterated this is *not* an issue with NFS
– because of large number of nagios alerts, p1 lost in the shuffle
– p1 is new error, 97% so more dire than the NFS issue
– Lester attempting to login, fails because of AWS security group
– adding his *own* home IP as whitelist (devs have access to AWS console)
– first time logging in from home?
– Lester deleted old DDD logfiles to clear up 1.2G
– plan to touch base again tomorrow about issue
o emailing Jake about status
o questions for Jake
– how to manage on-call & alerts
– how to manage developer access
– Roger mentioned secrets files are not shared with devs
o Lester questions, comments on servers & diskspace

Related: When you have to take the fall

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25 Rumsfelds Rules for Startups


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While we are still deep in the woods of a government shutdown, I thought it would be interesting to sum up some of our former Defense Secretary’s words of wisdom.

Rumsfeld may not have done everything right, but some of his quotes are priceless. What’s more they appeal to Startups quite nicely…

1 If you are working from your inbox, you are working on other people’s priorities.

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2 Men count up the faults of those who keep them waiting.

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3 In unanimity, there may well be either cowardice or uncritical thinking.

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4 Test ideas in the marketplace. You learn from hearing a range of perspectives.

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5. You can’t recover a fumble unless you’re on the field. Get out there.

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Read this: Why the Twitter IPO mentioned scalability

6. First law of holes. If you get in one, stop digging.

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7. Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.

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8. You pay the same price for doing something halfway as for doing it completely so you might as well do it completely.

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9. It is difficulties that show what men are.

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10. What you measure, improves.

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Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

11. If you are lost, “climb, conserve and confess”

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12. It is not the strongest species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

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13. Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

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14. People don’t spend money earned by others with the same care that they spend their own.

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15. Disagreement is not disloyalty.

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Related: Why a CTO must never do this

16. A lie travels halfway around the world before the truth gets its shoes on.

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17. It is easier to convince someone they’re right, than to convince them they’re wrong.

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18. Your best question is often why.

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19. Simply because a problem is shown to exist, it doesn’t necessarily follow that there is a solution.

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20. The world is run by those who show up.

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Read: Who is Sean Hull?

21. Don’t panic. Things may be going better than they seem from the inside.

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22. Know that the amount of criticism you receive may correlate closely to the amount of publicity you get.

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23. Sunshine is a weather report, a flood is news.

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24. If you expect people to be in on the landing, include them in the takeoff.

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25. If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.

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Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

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31 Essential Blogs for Startups & Scalability

So many blogs, so little time! Here’s our list of the best we’ve found. Currently our favorite reader is Pulse pictured left. Starting to play around with flipboard too.

Nuts & Bolts Technical

One of the original tech blogs, that still covers lots of breaking news, and difficult topics. Very technical, with probing commentary. Beware the actual comments though, as they’re often full of immature and childish rants.

Planet Mysql
An aggregator of many MySQL blogs, it hits on topics from benchmarking, and advanced tuning, to new technologies on the horizon. Drupal and LAMP topics are often also covered.

mysql performance blog
Percona’s technical blog never disappoints. There are endless posts about a myriad of topics related to deploying, tuning and optimizing MySQL and all it’s variants.

Hacker News
You may not like Paul Graham, he’s easy not to. But his YCombinator News site is an awesome collection of always surprising technical topics that are sure to keep you busy.

Netflix Tech Blog
You might have read about Chaos Monkey before, that

Our very own Scalable Startups
You’re already reading us regularly of course! Why not grab our newsletter?

Programmable Web
Mashups & APIs. What more do you want? Very cool stuff here.

Also take a look at our best of compilation.

Business & Economics

HBR Blog
If you’ve ever read Harvard Business Review, you know how in depth and on point the material is. More thorough discussions than many other blogs, and excellent discussions in the comments.

Marginal Revolution
Tyler Cowen’s endlessly interesting and provocative take on the world through the eyes of economics. Like using science to analyze and solve the worlds ails, this blog always has a reasoned take on things.

NPR Planet Money
I’ve been listening to this podcast religiously since the financial crisis of 2008. It continues to intrigue and educate me in ways that college finance never did. You’ll learn a lot.

Bloomberg Businessweek
BBW despite it’s name is like Wired back in the 90’s before it got taken over by Conde, and the cutting edge writers and risk takers left. That’s right this magazine is full of analysis, creativity, and color. It’s what you’re looking for in a print magazine. One of my favorites.

Inc. Magazine
Real articles for your small business needs today. Thoughtful and topical.

Forbes Magazine
Banking, finance, politics, news.

You might also check out our Scalable Startups newsletter archives.


Fred Wilson’s iconic blog is always on the cusp, with a thoughtful and participating audience of readers.

John Greathouse is a VC with a very readable blog on startups and investing.

Chris Dixon
This guy invested in tons of great startups that are household names now. With a very readable blog to match, he’s a man with ideas that we all benefit from.

As they call it, your “Essential Fix of Entrepreneurial Ideas”.

Feld Thoughts
Brad Feld is another big VC with an excellent blog on topics relevant to Venture Capital & Startups.


Andrew Chen
Consumer internet, metrics, and user growth. Brilliant idea guy. I learn from this guy’s blog everytime I check it.

The smarties behind the book of the same name, this is essential reading for bloggers who wanna make a dent in the world.

Blog Tyrant
How to build successful blogs that make real money. Learn from Ramsay Taplin who’s done it already. Whether your blog sells products, widgets or services, there’s stuff for you here.

Kissmetrics Marketing Blog
Very good stuff on marketing, twitter, facebook and all the other good social topics.

Mixergy Blog
Business tips & startup advice with a bent towards marketing and social.

Mark Schaefer Marketing
Mark’s the brains behind the great book Return on Influence which we reviewed. His Businesses Grow blog is full of helpful ideas and insights.

Figaro Speech
You may have read my review of Word Hero and seen the earlier review of Thank You For Arguing. His blog is a real gem, extending on the wonders and lessons of word hero, you’ll be writing witty and memorable one-liners and titles that will go viral tomorrow!


Om Malik started out writing about the bandwidth boom and bust of the 2000’s. His blog has grown wildly to cover the industry as a whole, and contrary to the stuff you get on business insider, this is quality journalism.

Another industry site with a great selection of journalists writing on the internet & startup industries.

Another excellent industry blog with slightly overlapping coverage to gigaom and allthingsd, but worth scanning each of them for different perspectives.

Possibly a bit more venture and investment oriented than the others, but still mainly an industry coverage blog site.

Slightly more focus on business, and entrepreneurs, but also internet & startup industry topics.

Trying to broaden my horizons by adding this one into the mix. Some very interesting topics, and plenty of overlap with internet industry and startups.

If you read this far, grab our newsletter!

The four-letter-word dividing Dev and Ops

devops divide

What’s that word?  RISK

Operations teams are tasked with stability and uptime. That means working against change, limiting or slowing it down where possible.

Developers are tasked with features and delivering business solutions. For that an ORM layer seems appealing for example. It speeds up & simplifies coding. At the same time it eliminates database drudgery.

For ops who are tasked with uptime, an ORM is a force against scalability. I’ve outlined five things toxic to scalability. They work against performance.

The question remains – do devops folks solve the problem?

Consider the banking crisis

Bankers are tasked with making money for their shareholders. To do this they innovate with financial products. Though you may argue they are unscrupulous at times, capitalism and shareholder value drive them to find profit.

Meanwhile the government’s job is to provide a level playing field.  They enact rules, regulate and provide oversight and auditing. As with operations, this is a conservative role, that avoids risk, and seeks stability, growth and avoidance of recessions and depressions.

These tradeoffs exist in many disciplines. The trick is how we find the balance.

There is an equally interesting question of decoupling in internet architectures. I’ll write a future piece on similar parallels I see in the economy at large.

Business lessons from brokering a half million dollar deal

I’ve had my Manhattan loft in the market for some six months now. After dropping the asking price a couple of times, buyers are finally circling, and I’m close to finalizing a deal.  In that time however, I’ve learned some big lessons.  Real Estate, is the epitome of cutthroat capitalism and as such has some very potent lessons to teach about business.

Understand Interests – Two Sides to Every Argument

Brokers have an interest – to make their fee;  buyers have an interest – to lower the selling price, sellers have an interest to get the highest selling price.  On the surface this may seem self evident.  But dig a little deeper and you’ll learn more. Brokers are somewhat aligned with buyer and seller, but like a cab driver preferring lots of short trips, their incentive is to do more deals. Fewer deals with higher margins would actually cost them. A 1%-2% higher selling price may be significant to your bottom line but meaningless to theirs.

[quote]Business Lesson 1 – Pay close attention to each party’s interests and you’ll understand the negotiating dynamic more clearly.[/quote]

In brokering, like war, no one plays fair

Each industry has it’s own ugly side. No one calls back. No one emails back. There are no pleasantries. In some businesses where credibility and reputation are built over time, people do care–little bit. But in brokering a large deal they don’t.  Silence means “Hey, thanks for going out of your way to give us an hour of your time even though we were late.  We don’t care.  We no longer need you & we’re not gonna respond.”  Got it, heard you loud and clear!

[quote]Business Lesson 2 – Be prepared for selfishness and deception. In some cases watch out for cheaters and even fraud.  Don’t let this color all your interactions, but be aware that some parties may not have the same scruples as you do and some may even break the law. [/quote]

Markets are bigger than you are

You may think your house or apartment has some intrinsic value, based on renovations or the time you’ve held it, or some other more personal metric. However the market is ultimately what sets the price of the asset. Market trends can swing wildly and irrationally so be prepared to “get real”, as they say in the business.

[quote]Business Lesson 3 – Market forces set the price of a good or service. The door swings both ways so when there is a greater supply be prepared for the price to go down, and when location, asset or skills are in great demand, be prepared for the price to go up.[/quote]

Buyers move on emotion; facts get you only so far

Salesmen tell stories. It’s their job to engage, stir passions, get people to move. Sometimes these yarns are taller than you or I might like, but if people knew exactly what they wanted, brokers wouldn’t exist. This occurs across the spectrum in sales.

[quote]Business Lesson 4 – Pay less attention to the facts and arguments a salesmen presents to you. Only the underlying interest of each party will tell a clear story of motivations. Weigh that along with the market appetite and you should have a good idea of the right price.[/quote]

Protect your interests and time

Over the months I’ve been on the market, I’ve had countless brokers try to sell me their services. An exclusive seller agreement is valuable to a broker as it allows them to control the process and control the fee distribution. One broker made an appointment to come by with their buyer over a holiday weekend. Following up at the appointed time, they explained that they were running late though frankly the broker sounded hung over. Upon arrival they brought no buyer. Seeing my irritation, they quickly fabricated a story about a phantom buyer and their specific requirements. After wasting a few hours of my time and breaking up my holiday weekend, I never heard from them again. Not fun.

[quote]Business Lesson 5 – Qualify your prospect before you grant them your time. There are many parties who can and will waste your time if you’re not careful. Be diligent about weeding them out before clearing your schedule for them.[/quote]

iHeavy Insights 77 – What Consultants Do


What Do Consultants Do?

Consultants bring a whole host of tools to experiences to bear on solving your business problems.  They can fill a need quickly, look in the right places, reframe the problem, communicate and get teams working together, and bring to light problems on the horizon. And they tell stories of challenges they faced at other businesses, and how they solved them.

Frame or Reframe The Problem

Oftentimes businesses see the symptoms of a larger problem, but not the cause.  Perhaps their website is sluggish at key times, causing them to lose customers.  Or perhaps it is locking up inexplicably.  Framing the problem may involve identifying the bottleneck and pointing to a particular misconfigured option in the database or webserver.  Or it may mean looking at the technical problem you’ve chosen to solve and asking if it meets or exceeds what the business needs.

Tell Business Stories

Clients often have a collection of technologies and components in place to meet their business needs.  But day-to-day running of a business is ultimately about bringing a product or service to your customer.  Telling stories of challenges and solutions of past customers, helps illustrate, educate, and communicate problems you’re facing today.

Fill A Need Quickly

If you have an urgent problem, and your current staff is over extended, bringing in a consultant to solve a specific problem can be a net gain for everyone.  They get up to speed quickly, bring fresh perspectives, and review your current processes and operations.  What’s more they can be used in a surgical way, to augment your team for a short stint.

Get Teams Communicating

I’ve worked at quite a number of firms over the years and tasked with solving a specific technical problem only to find the problem was a people problem to begin with.  In some cases the firm already has the knowledge and expertise to solve a problem, but some members are blocking.  This can be because some folks feel threatened by a new solution which will take away responsibilities they formerly held.  Or it can be because they feel some solution will create new problems which they will then be responsible to cleanup.  In either case bridging the gap between business needs and operations teams to solve those needs can mean communicating to each team in ways that make sense to them.  A technical detail oriented focus makes most sense when working with the engineering teams, business and bottom-line focused when communicating with the management team.

Highlight Or Bring To Light Problems On Horizon

Is our infrastructure a ticking timebomb?  Perhaps our backups haven’t been tested and are missing some crucial component?  Or we’ve missed some security consideration, left some password unset, left the proverbial gate open to the castle.  When you deal with your operations on a day-to-day basis, little details can be easy to miss.  A fresh perspective can bring needed insight.

BOOK REVIEW – Jaron Lanier – You Are Not a Gadget

Lanier is a programmer, musician, the father of VR way back in the 90’s, and wide-ranging thinker on topics in computing and the internet.

His new book is a great, if at times meandering read on technology, programming, schizophrenia, inflexible design decisions, marxism, finance transformed by cloud, obscurity & security, logical positivism, strange loops and more.

He opposes the thinking-du-jour among computer scientists, leaning in a more humanist direction summed up here:  “I believe humans are the result of billions of years of implicit, evolutionary study in the school of hard knocks.”    The book is worth a look.

5 Tips for Scalability

Your website is slow but you’re not sure why.  You do know that it’s impacting your business.  Are you losing customers to the competition? Here are five quick tips to achieve scalability

1. Gather Intelligence

With any detective work you need information.  That’s where intelligence comes in.  If you don’t have the right data already, install monitoring and trending systems such as Cacti and Collectd.  That way you can look at where your systems have been and where they’re going.

2. Identify Bottlenecks

Put all that information to use in your investigation.  Use stress testing tools to hit areas of the application, and identify which ones are most troublesome.  Some pages get hit A LOT, such as the login page, so slowness there is more serious than one small report that gets hit by only  a few users.  Work on the biggest culprits first to get the best bang for your buck.

3. Smooth Out the Wrinkles

Reconfigure your webservers to make more connections to your database, or spin-up more servers.  On the database tier make sure you have fast RAIDed disk, and lots of memory.  Tune queries coming from your application, and look at possible upgrades to servers.

4. Be Agile But Plan for the Future

Can your webserver tier scale horizontally?  Pretty easy to add more servers under a load balancer.  How about your database.  Chances are with a little work and some HA magic your database can scale out with more servers too, moving the bulk of select operations to read-only copies of your primary server, while letting it focus on transactions, and data updates.  Be ready and tested so you know exactly how to add servers without impacting the customers or application.  Don’t know how?  Look at the big guys like Facebook, an investigate how they’re doing it.

5. A Going Concern

Most importantly, just like your business, your technology infrastructure is an ongoing work in progress.  Stay proactive with monitoring, analysis, trending, and vigilance.  Watch application changes, and filter for slow queries.  Have new hardware or additional hardware dynamically at-the-ready for when you need it.