What have I learned in 10 years of blogging?


I was just reading Andrew Chen’s latest posting, where he distills many of the things he’s learned from blogging over a decade.

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This reminded me that I’ve been blogging that long as well. And to be sure it has brought great benefits. In the way that public speaking gives you visibility, but also forces you to communicate better, form your voice, and so on.

All the great things you gain by talking to other people, and getting into the conversation.

1. Understand your audience

I struggled with this when I first started blogging. As any engineer might approach things, I thought I should publish technical material. What better way to show what I know. And further how I can help a customer.

What I didn’t realize is that all of your readers aren’t technical. So it goes a long way if you can appeal to a broader audience.

I found that my readers fell into a few big categories.

1. Fellow engineers & peers
2. Hiring managers & startup CTOs
3. Recruiters & other publishers

This really helped me divide up the types of content I would write, some directed towards each of the different audiences.

Related: Why does Reddit CTO Martin Weiner advocate boring tech?

2. Tell your story

I’ve written often about why I wrote the book on Oracle. In it I outlined a long arc of datacenter evolution which started with the maturity of Linux, and today provides the bedrock of the cloud that is Amazon Web Services among others.

What this also allowed me to do is tell my own history.

Related: 5 reasons devops should blog

3. Form your voice

Forming your voice is different than speaking to specific audiences. It’s about having opinions & getting into the line of fire. Being passionate about a subject, you’re sure to care & sit on one side or the other of a particular argument.

For example I argued the Android ecosystem was broken. Although Google has fixed some of these problems, many remain as a symptom of the platform itself.

I also argued with Fred Wilson’s estimation of Apple being overvalued. At the time in May 2014 the price was at $85. Now it sits comfortably at $177.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

4. Put yourself out there

Putting yourself out there isn’t easy. You’ll be open to criticism. And sometimes you’ll be wrong. But by challenging yourself in this way you’ll grow too. And prospects will notice this. More than engineering might, and power at the keyboard, your perspective of what’s happening in computing generally, and what is on the horizon is invaluable to customers.

Related: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

5. Learn & Share

Writing howtos is a great challenge too. By forcing yourself to teach something, you in turn learn the material better. You become better at executing, and formulating solutions.

As you share knowledge, you’ll also learn from others. As the disqus.com comments on my site can attest. Sure you get much of this same value from having an active account on Reddit.com, but your own real estate carries even more weight for your personal brand.

Related: Why you should always be publishing

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Some irresistible reading for March – outages, code, databases, legacy & hiring


I decided this week to write a different type of blog post. Because some of my favorite newsletters are lists of articles on topics of the day.

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Here’s what I’m reading right now.

1. On Outages

While everyone is scrambling to figure out why part of the internet went down … wait is S3 is part of the internet, really? While I’m figuring out if it is a service of Amazon, or if Amazon is so big that Amazon *is* the internet now…

Let’s look at s3 architectural flaws in depth.

Meanwhile Gitlab had an outage too in which they *gasp* lost data. Seriously? An outage is one thing, losing data though. Hmmm…

And this article is brilliant on so many levels. No least because Matthew knows that “post truth” is a trending topic now, and uses it his title. So here we go, AWS Service status truth in a post truth world. Wow!

And meanwhile the Atlantic tries to track down where exactly are those Amazon datacenters?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. On Code

Project wise I’m fiddling around with a few fun things.

Take a look at Guy Geerling’s Ansible on a Mac playbooks. Nice!

And meanwhile a very nice deep dive on Amazon Lambda serverless best practices.

Brandur Leach explains how to build awesome APIs aka ones that are robust & idempotent

Meanwhile Frans Rosen explains how to 0wn slack. And no you don’t want this. 🙂

Related: 5 surprising features in Amazon’s serverless Lambda offering

3. On Hiring & Talent

Are you a rock star dev or a digital nomad? Take a look at the 12 best international cities to live in for software devs.

And if you’re wondering who’s hiring? Well just about everyone!

Devs are you blogging? You should be.

Looking to learn or teach… check out codementor.

Also: why did dev & ops used to be separate job roles?

4. On Legacy Systems

I loved Drew Bell’s story of stumbling into home ownership, attempting to fix a doorbell, and falling down a familiar rabbit hole. With parallels to legacy software systems… aka any older then oh say five years?

Ian Bogost ruminates why nothing works anymore… and I don’t think an hour goes by where I don’t ask myself the same question!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

5. On Databases

If you grew up on the virtual world of the cloud, you may have never touched hardware besides your own laptop. Developing in this world may completely remove us from understanding those pesky underlying physical layers. Yes indeed folks containers do run in “virtual” machines, but those themselves are running on metal, somewhere down the stack.

With that let’s not forget that No, databases are not for containers… but a healthy reminder ain’t bad..

Meanwhile Larry’s mothership is sinking…(hint: Oracle) Does anybody really care? Now’s the time to revisit Mike Wilson’s classic The difference between god and Larry Ellison.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

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5 startup & scalability blogs I never miss – week 2

5 blogs week 2

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Hunter Walk – Startups

If you want to have your finger on the pulse of startup land, there aren’t many better places to start than Hunter Walk’s 99% humble writings. Google finds his top posts on topics like AngelList, Advisors, and reinventing the movie theatre. Good writing, insiders view.

Read: NYC technology startups are hiring

Arnold Waldstein – Marketing

I first found Arnold’s blog using my trusty disqus discovery hack. He had written an interesting piece about new mobile shopping at popup stores like Kate Spade.

Follow him on Disqus, follow the blog, get the newsletter. All good stuff.

Read This: Why hiring is a numbers game

Claire Diaz Ortiz – Social Media

Claire writes a lot about social media, twitter & blogging. She wrote an excellent guide to increasing your pagerank, another on 30 important people to follow on twitter and more. She can even help you find a job.

Check out: Top MySQL DBA Interview questions for candidates, managers & recruiters

Bruce Schneier – Security

Bruce Schneier is one of the original bad boys of computer security. He writes about broad topics, that affect us all everyday from common sense about airport security, to the impacts of cryptography for you and me. Very worth looking at regularly, just to see what he’s paying attention to.

Also: Why operations & MySQL DBA talent is hard to find

Eric Hammond – Amazon Cloud

Eric Hammond has been writing about Amazon Web Services, EC2 & Ubuntu for years now. He maintains and releases some excellent AMIs, those are the machine images for spinning up new servers in Amazon’s cloud.

Even if you’re not big on the command line, you can get a lot of critical insight about the Amazon cloud by keeping up with his blog. Jeff Barr’s AWS blog is also good, but not nearly as critical and boots on the ground as Eric’s.

Also: 8 Questions to ask an AWS expert

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Pro Blogging with the Pros

I picked up a copy of the Problogger book and flipped to the Blog Promotion chapter.  In it they recommended – Create compilation pages.

I tried it

I crafted a new post, selected some of my blogs most popular material, organized it with nice punchy one line summaries, and after about 20 minutes posted it.  Hey what the heck, I’ll give it a try.

It Worked!

  • interlink within your posts – this is huge!
  • highlight related posts
  • quote important points as excerpts
  • ask questions and invite comments

There are other great chapters on Social Media to get your posts going viral, and of course the ever important monetization topic is covered nicely.

Go pickup a copy of this book.  It’s worth much more than the cover price for sure!