What Recession? – New York Tech Hiring Frenzy

startups hiringAccording to Crains, New York is digital jobs central.  ZocDoc, Thrillist, Foursquare and 10gen are just a few of the hot shots located at 568 Broadway, a tech hub in Soho.  Each of these firms is looking to double their headcount in the coming year.  Not bad considering the rough shape much of the economy is in.

Don’t Forget the Big Boys

Let’s not forget the huge tech firms that are also on a hiring binge,  Google, Facebook, Zynga, Twitter & Skype are all hiring.  Bloomberg Businessweek describes it literally as Silicon Valley setting up shop here!

This interactive map of the tech scene in New York is striking.

Population Growth

New York is also experiencing serious population growth.  The city expanded by 70,000 people in the last 15 months according to Gothamist.

According to another Crains article, what we’re seeing is the best job gains in 60 years!

Increased Competition for Talent

All this means increased competition for the best talent.  These days only the biggest or the coolest firms can snag the smartest people.

We wrote some hiring guides that might help: How to Hire a Great Software Developer and another about filling the Mythical MySQL DBA role.

A two part article – How to Hire a MySQL DBA and Part two.

All This and Fun Too!

And hey, what other city has spawned the European inspired Lunch Beat?

 

 

Ask Me Questions – Scalability, Performance, Cloud Computing

 

 

I blog a lot about various topics near and dear to me.  So I thought I’d turn the tables a bit, and offer the microphone up to readers.  Do you have questions on any of these topics?  Feel free to drop a note in the comments.

 

Business & Consulting

Are you a freelancer or independent consultant?  Struggling with some part of the business?  Or are you a CTO or Director looking to hire short term talent?  Glad to offer up advice and suggestions, just fire away!

Scalability

The goal of every hypergrowth company, from Pinterest to Facebook, Zynga to FourSquare.  How do they achieve it?  What architecture decisions make those applications grow effortlessly to meet user demand?  I’m sure you have some questions!

Performance

It’s on everyone’s mind, especially in the context of deploying in the cloud.  How best to achieve good performance?  Are you struggling with something specific?

High Availability

We want our systems to be available 24x7x 3million days a year!  Is it feasible?  What should we aim for in the real world?  Does our technology mix and hosting factor into the equation?  Ask away.

Startup Challenges

I’ve worked with a lot of startups over the years.  From the dot-com hey days to the more sober field we see before us today.  Many struggle with similar challenges.  Am glad to offer up comments and suggestions from what I’ve learned over the years.

Cloud Computing

What really works in the cloud? Is Amazon EC2 the only way to go?  What are the pros and cons of going with a Rackspace type provider that also has great service and the physical data center option?  How will I get good performance?  These and other questions are on everyone’s lips.  Feel free to comment if you have some concerns.

 

Consulting essentials: Building your business

In the last two posts on how to build a successful consulting business I shared advice and tips on closing deals and managing and completing your engagements.

This post will look at where to focus your efforts in order to sustain your consulting business, and build skills.

Focus on your subject matter expertise

Being a subject matter expert takes years of education, and professional experience to build. It’s your most valuable asset. Build it, and use it. This is not to say there isn’t great value in being a generalist as I’ve emphasized in blog postings. But don’t get distracted trying to do things others can do better. Web-based newsletter managers can do it better than you can, professional invoicing solutions as well. Though you might be able to do a bit of HTML and graphic design, if that’s not your expertise, hire someone to do your website in WordPress. You’ll save time and money in the long run, and their professional experience will surely include a few surprising nuggets of value that you wouldn’t have known yourself.

Manage your business with online tools

There are a myriad of online tools to help you run your business better.

Google Analytics – Get insights on what parts of your site your customers find valuable. Learn to convert those visitors with downloads, newsletter signups and ebooks for sale.

Freshbooks, Zoho or Paymo – There are many online invoicing solutions, so best to evaluate them for your specific needs. The point is, using a solution will save you money in the end, and make you more professional in the process. It’ll help you track monthly & yearly, send reminders, and summarize things for you all in one place.

Mailchimp – Newsletter creation can’t get any more fun than with mailchimp. With endless video howtos, documents, and great support, plus templates for your newsletter that come in every shape and size, these guys have really thought of everything. What’s more the graphs and campaign reports will give you insight into what topics are popular, and what resonates with your audience.

Google Docs and Calendars allow you to share your schedule and work with a small team. So whether it’s communicating things with your clients, or your subcontractors, these tools are essential.

Dropbox – Another indispensable tool for collaboration, share documents easily across the web.

Don’t Be a Commodity

If your prospect is asking you for a resume, and comparing you to some outsourced resources provide, you’re not going to get very far as a consultant. Don’t be a generic resource that sits at the keyboard and churns out code.

What’s the alternative? Learn about business, talk to business stakeholders, listen to their concerns, and learn to speak their language. Use stories, and analogies. Reach across the table to speak in terms that everyone can understand. Your value is in symplifying complex technology.

Be Hungry & Don’t Give Up!

Being hungry means continuing to improve on your weaknesses, experimenting with different rates until you match the market demand, managing multiple projects and always networking widely. Spend less than you make and build up six to twelve months cushion. This will allow you much more freedom to take only the projects you want. Learn to pick and choose.

Further Reading…

There are lots of other areas you’ll lean about, running a successful consulting business. Here are a few:

  • managing cash flow
  • paying quarterly & yearly corp taxes
  • paying subcontractors
  • managing & accounting for expenses

Consulting essentials: Managing & Completing Engagements

This is the second in a series of three articles on Consulting Essentials.
Read the previous post, Consulting essentials: Getting the business

Communicating well and knowing when to step in or stand back is the linchpin of successful consulting.
Some people have natural charm. If you’re one of these people you’ll find consulting is definitely for you. You’ll use that skill all the time as each new client brings a half dozen or a dozen new people to interact with.

If it doesn’t come easily, practice practice practice. Try to get out of your own head space, and hear what troubles your client, and what big business challenges worry them.

Be ready to help but don’t try to be the hero


A decade ago I worked for an Internet startup. They were having serious performance problems which was slowing down the site, and turning users away. When digging into the systems I found serious security issues besides the performance ones, and got distracted trying to wrap up those lest someone break in and destroy or steal their business assets. Communicating the situation to the client, they looked aghast. After explaining the situation to them, they understood the risks and explained that the current priorities were to get users back online.

The technical problems I saw may not have been aligned with the business priorities. Your job is to make your client happy. Provide your professional opinion and advice whenever and wherever your skills come into play, but let them run their own business.

If you’re focusing on one area, and you discover other problems or things that may need resolving going forward, bring this to the attention of the client. Allow them to prioritize for themselves. It’s their business not yours. Your job is to give your professional opinion, raise concerns that you see, but most importantly solve problems they want you to solve.

Project Your Personality

Smile a lot and listen to people. Make sure you’re talking less than half the time. When you first engage with a client, they should be speaking more like two-thirds of the time. You want to get in the habit of listening, and stepping in your clients shoes. You want to understand their pain, their business concerns and how to satisfy them.

Manage Time Efficiently

Get things done. Everybody talks about it, but not everyone does it. I personally avoid all the faddish tools for this, and use a simple checklist. Focus on the task at hand. Give yourself a doable list of tasks each day, and check them off as you go. Try hard to avoid working on things not on that list. The last point relates back to the principle of solving only the problems that you’ve been asked to solve.

Communicate Successes & Progress

In many engagements you’ll come upon struggles and get blocked by situations that seem intransigent. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to communicate with the client during these situations. Don’t get stuck thinking it will make you look weak. Communicating with the client has a number of surprising advantages.

For one sometimes they’ll have a solution, such as a different angle on the business problem, or insight and details that just simplify the problem you think you thought needed to be solved.

Second, it allows the client to adjust schedules in advance if something will take a little longer. You’d be surprised how often a client will sympathize with a difficult problem.

Lastly, involving the client intimately allows them to enjoy the triumph when you solve the problem. This helps morale, communicates more about what it is you do day-to-day and how you work through a problem. And overall it helps them appreciate the intrinsic value you’re providing.

The Problem with Startup Bootcamps

instant startups

Scanning Crains NY Business recently, I saw an article on ‘starting up’ in 54 hours.  It’s the brainchild of Marc Nager, Clint Nelsen and Franck Nouyrigat called Startup Weekend. Startup bootcamps seem to be the current extra-curricular activity of choice these days. Wharton is also getting in on it with their Innovation Tournament. Then there is the 48 Hour Startup  and of course let’s not forget the 3 Day Startup.

So what’s my beef?  Truth be told I admire the ambition, the optimism, and the openness of these efforts.  And for sure these bootstrapping marathons do introduce entrepreneurs to future colleagues and partners, get them asking the right questions about financing, customers, revenue, competition and so forth.

My problem with these events is they frame startups as something you *can* do quickly. As if it were a Lego set or pop-up book that gives instant results and gratification. Sure startups are 21st century tech-driven business that provide innovative products in a very short development cycle but a lot of the day-to-day running of the business are still very mundane 20th century sensibilities; not unlike running a mom and pop store, a laundromat, deli or sandwich shop.

Continue reading “The Problem with Startup Bootcamps”

Book Review – The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

The Lean Startup coverWhat do you do after founding not one, but two companies and watching them fail miserably all by the time you were barely out of college?

Move to the Valley, make shrewd investments in other startups and become insanely rich like Sean Parker? A Bit lofty perhaps. How about try, try again and succeed. Then reinvent yourself as a guru dishing out startup wisdom through your blog and publishing a book that ends up the top of the New York Times Bestseller’s list. That’s essentially what Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup did.

True entrepreneurs fail many times before they succeed and continuously find opportunities to reinvent themselves. Ries is one of them. He’s taken all that he’s learned from his failures, and later successes, from his college years in the 1990s right through the dotcom crash, and packaged them into a guide for startups to consult in their quest for world domination.  Continue reading “Book Review – The Lean Startup by Eric Ries”

Why generalists are better at scaling the web

Join 12,100 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Recently at Surge 2011, the annual  conference on scalability  and performance, Google’s CIO Ben Fried gave an illuminating keynote address. His main insight was that generalists are the people that will lead engineering teams in successfully scaling the web.

Read: Why devops talent is in short supply

In a world where the badge of Specialist or Expert is prized, this was refreshing perspective from an industry bigwig. As tech professionals, or any professional for that matter, we don’t welcome the label of generalist. The word suggests a jack-of-all-trades and master of none. But the generalist is no less an expert than the specialist. Generalists can get their hands greasy with the tools to fix bugs in the machine but they are especially good at mobilizing the machine itself; with their talents of broad vision, and perspective they can direct an entire team to accomplish tasks efficiently. This ability to see big-picture can not be underestimated especially during times of crisis or pressure to meet targets. For a team to scale the web effectively, you’re going to need a good mix of both types of personalities.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

Continue reading “Why generalists are better at scaling the web”

Scale Quickly Like Birchbox – Startup Scalability 101

One of the great things about the Internet is how it has made it easier to put great ideas into practice. Whether the ideas are about improving people’s lives or a new way to sell and old-fashioned product, there’s nothing like a good little startup tale of creative disruption to deliver us from something old and tired.

We work with a lot of startup firms and we love being part of the atmosphere of optimism and ingenuity, peppered with a bit of youthful zeal – something very indie-rock-and-roll about it. But whether they are just starting out or already picking up pace every startup faces the same challenges to scale a business. Recently, we were reminded of this when we watched Inc’s video interview with Birchbox founders, Hayley Barna and Katia Beauchamp. Continue reading “Scale Quickly Like Birchbox – Startup Scalability 101”