Scale Quickly Like Birchbox – Startup Scalability 101

One of the great things about the Internet is how it has made it easier to put great ideas into practice. Whether the ideas are about improving people’s lives or a new way to sell and old-fashioned product, there’s nothing like a good little startup tale of creative disruption to deliver us from something old and tired.

We work with a lot of startup firms and we love being part of the atmosphere of optimism and ingenuity, peppered with a bit of youthful zeal – something very indie-rock-and-roll about it. But whether they are just starting out or already picking up pace every startup faces the same challenges to scale a business. Recently, we were reminded of this when we watched Inc’s video interview with Birchbox founders, Hayley Barna and Katia Beauchamp. Continue reading “Scale Quickly Like Birchbox – Startup Scalability 101”

5 Tips for Better Database Change Management

Deploying new code that includes changes to your database schema doesn’t have to be a process fraught with stress and burned fingers. Follow these five tips and enjoy a good nights sleep.

1. Deploy with Roll Forward & Rollback Scripts

When developers check-in code that requires schema changes, that release should also require two scripts to perform database changes. One script will apply those changes, alter tables to add columns, change data types, seed data, clean data, create new tables, views, stored procedures, functions, triggers and so forth. A release should also include a rollback script, which would return tables to their previous state. Continue reading “5 Tips for Better Database Change Management”

5 Scalability Pitfalls to Avoid

1. Object Relational Mappers

Software development has always made use of libraries, off-the-shelf components that are shared between different projects.  These allow you to stand on the shoulders of others and build bigger things.  Frameworks do the same thing, they provide a context from which to build on.  Ruby on Rails for example provides a great starting framework from which to build web applications, managing sessions in an elegant way. Continue reading “5 Scalability Pitfalls to Avoid”

Top 3 Questions From Clients

1. This page or area of the website is very slow, why?

There are a lot of components that make up modern internet websites, and a lot of places to get stuck in the mud.  Website performance starts with the browser, what caching it is doing, their bandwidth to your server, what the webserver is doing (caching or not and how), if the webserver has sufficient memory, and then what the application code is doing and lastly how it is interacting with the backend database. Continue reading “Top 3 Questions From Clients”

Open Source Enables the Cloud

With the fast growth of virtualized data centers, and companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook, it’s easy to forget how much is built on open-source components, aka commodity software.  In a very real way open-source has enabled the huge explosion of commodity hardware, the fast growth of the internet itself, and now the further acceleration through cloud services, cloud infrastructure, and virtualization of data centers.

Your typical internet stack and application now stands on the shoulders of tens of thousands of open source developers and projects.  Let’s look at a few of them. Continue reading “Open Source Enables the Cloud”

Cloud for Burst Capacity

One very strong case for cloud computing is that it can satisfy applications with seasonal traffic patterns.  One way to test the advantages of the cloud is through a hybrid approach.

Cloud infrastructure can be built completely through scripts.  You can spinup specific AMIs or machine images, automatically install and update packages, install your credentials, startup services, and you’re running.

All of these steps can be performed in advance of your need at little cost.  Simply build and test.  When you’re finished, shutdown those instances.  What you walk away with is scripts.  What do we mean?

The power here is that you carry zero costs for that burst capacity until you need it.  You’ve already build the automation scripts, and have them in place.  When your capacity planning warrants it, spinup additional compute power, and watch your internet application scale horizontally.  Once your busy season is over, scale back and disable your usage until you need it again.

iHeavy Insights 83 – Shoe Leather Cost

Shoe leather cost is similar to opportunity cost.  It refers to the cost of counteracting inflation by keeping less of your assets in cash.  Your strategy would require more trips to the bank and more walking, and incur a cost in the wearing out of the leather in your shoes.

All joking aside, it’s an interesting idea.  It highlights how there are all sorts of hidden costs to different strategies.  There are hidden costs to using coupons, loyalty cards, frequent flyer miles, managing assets & investments, hiring resources and in general running a business.  Let’s look at a few. Continue reading “iHeavy Insights 83 – Shoe Leather Cost”

Book Review – Rework

rework coverRework is chock full of ideas

Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson’s new book REWORK is one of the best startup business books I’ve read since Alan Weiss’ Million Dollar Consulting. If you’re already a fan of their signal vs noise blog, you’d be familiar with their terse style. Sharp and to the point.

Which is why you can pick it up and read it in a few hours.  You’ll want to because it’s well written and pared down to essentials.  In fact the book reads like their workflow advice, less mass, do it yourself, cut out the fat, concentrate on essentials.  As such they are clearly practicing what they preach, which I like. Continue reading “Book Review – Rework”