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How to increase newsletter signup conversions with nifty iphone trick

If you’re like me & spending a lot of time on twitter, I hope you’re also seeing the traffic growth I’m seeing. I’m sharing a stream of posts using hootsuite, then actively engaging with journalists, VCs, startups & technology experts.

That’s all great, and I’m finding more and more it’s a good use of my time.

Recently I started using a cool iphone feature to let followers know about my newsletter. It’s called a shortcut.

Have you ever mistyped a word on iOS? It then offers up the correct spelling. Through this same mechanism, there is an awesome way to quickly type anything. Use a two or three character shortcut to type a paragraph.

Take a look, here’s what I mean.

1. Click through to Settings->General->Keyboard

Open your iphone settings, and navigate through General, and then Keyboard.

keyboard tab

Also: Why you should track your time on social media

2. Find the Shortcuts tab

Navigate until you find shortcuts. It should look like this:

shortcuts tab

Read: Do managers underestimate operational costs?

3. Create a shortcut

Add a new shortcut with the plus button.

create shortcut

Phrase: “u may also like my newsletter http://iheavy.com/signup-scalable-startups-newsletter”

Shortcut: mytest

edit shortcut

Related: When I had to take the fall

4. Use your new shortcut on twitter

Responding to a new follower, or in a dialog with a journalist? In a response somewhere along the way, type “dyo”. Just like a typo correction, you’ll see iOS offer you a completion, the full text you want to use. Click (space) to accept it.

use shortcut

Check this: Why a killer title make or break your content efforts

5. Post it periodically using trending hashtags

Open twitter & click timelines->discover

Click View more trending…

Scroll through for related topics. For me anything technology, startup, scalability, devops, venture, founder, database related, I’ll use that word, hashtag of phrase.

(BONUS) Create four or five shortcut variations

Nobody wants to see the same thing repeated over and over. So create a few variations. Mix it up a bit.

I’m seeing huge conversion rate on these. I haven’t measured yet (not sure how), but anecdotally I’d say in the 30-50% range. In other words if I mentioned my newsletter to 10 people during the day on twitter, I get about 3-5 new signups. This compared to one newsletter signup per day, passively through my blog.

By directly imploring people to signup, you bring it front and center to their already busy & distracted attention. It works!

Read: Is scaling automatic in the cloud?

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Round up of recent scalability, startup & social media posts

strawberries

If you’re checking back in, we’ve written a lot of new content recently. Here are some highlights for digging a little deeper.

Join 13,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Why you should evaluate carefully before hiring a consultant

You’re a startup, and you’re grappling with some particularly thorny problems. You’ve gotten pocked and scratched, and are still struggling with big issues. So you’ve decided to hire a consultant, now what?

Evaluating consultants is a key step to ensure you find someone you can work with. But how is the process different from interviewing a candidate for a fulltime role? Here’s our thoughts on it.

2. Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

For devops & techops bloggers out there, I’ve put together this quick howto guide. Titles really make the difference as to whether your content gets noticed, or ends up dying on the vine.

Don’t let it happen. Practice some creative title writing and other tips and you’ll be zooming your way to the top!

3. Why real world high availability is so hard to deliver

Five nines, goes the saying, is the gold standard for availability. But if it is really a standard, then why the heck isn’t anybody really achieving it?

4. Why a four letter word divides dev and ops

The on-going battle between developers and operations teams rages, devops be damned. Here’s our take on the age-old turf war!

5. Why Amazon RDS doesn’t support Percona or MariaDB

Should I use Amazon RDS or build my own MySQL box on EC2? It’s a question I hear constantly from clients and prospects. The answer of course is it depends!

In this short article, I hit on some of the typical use cases, and discuss which solution is best. If you’re interested in Percona & MariaDB, you’ll want to take a look.

6. Why techops talent is in short supply

Database administrators? Systems administrators? Ops teams? They don’t carry the sexy allure that rock star developers do, but once code is deployed, and out in the wild, these are the swat teams, and national guardsmen that you’ll rely on everyday. They’ll monitor your systems, and when necessary wake at 3am to repair things that have fallen over.

Despite their crucial role in web application deployments in the cloud, they remain in short supply.

7. 5 more things deadly to scalability

Scalability is the goal every fast growth startup struggles with. Here are some key best practices to keep reliability and capacity in the crosshairs.

8. Why the Twitter IPO makes a shocking admission about scalability

Flip through a tech company IPO filing, and you’ll find some rather vulnerable admissions about data centers and fragile architectures. How can this even be possible, for a major internet firm that’s dealt with the fail whale many times before?

9. Why reaching journalists with email fails where social media & twitter succeed

After reading Adrienne Erin’s 7 deadly sins of pitching I felt discouraged. Everything she said in there I had done. Pitching is a game neither writers or journalists enjoy. I’d long since given up on it.

Then I thought about it some more. Actually I’d had some good success reaching journalists on social media. I just didn’t really think of it as pitching per se. That’s because it was more like getting into the conversation. It was almost like the networking and hob nobbing we do naturally at conferences and meetups. So I wrote about what worked for me. Read more

10. 25 Rumsfelds Rules for startups & managers with tweetible links

Donald Rumsfeld, what can be said? What can’t be said? Well for all controversy and bad press you have to give him credit for some great one liners.

I picked up his new book, and couldn’t put it down. There’s inspiration on every page!

So I selected out my twenty five favorite quotes, and included them here for your twitter enjoyment!

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Why email pitching fails when social media succeeds

Editor & writer in friendly dialog

I was reading Adrienne Erin’s muck rack list 7 deadly sins of pitching. It struck me that I had committed many of the sins she mentioned. Maybe I was writing too much, or emailing at the wrong time, or being boring. It’s possible. Unfortunately I don’t know which of the sins to work on. Because there was no dialog.

But thinking about it more, maybe it’s just the nature of email? I’ve definitely tried pitching before, and didn’t seem to get anywhere. Not even a response. It seemed all that formality was falling flat. Ultimately email pitching is a waste of time. There I said it. I’ve sent them, never seemed to get me very far, try, try as I might.

Join 13,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Reading her sins though, I did feel inspired a bit to write about what has worked for me. And what has worked from time to time is having real conversations on twitter.

What I’ve learned is, drum roll please… don’t make pitching like cold calling or online dating. Because those lack context. Without that, you’re just a stranger…

So what do I do? Here’s what’s worked for me.

1. Twitter has tools, make a list

Search google for a Gigaom, Forbes, Pando or ReadWrite and you can find a list of twitter handles. But they’re all not created equally.

Some folks use twitter as a one-way ticker, but don’t converse much. Or they focus on topics not related to industry & business. Others actively use twitter professionally. Look for the latter folks.

Related: Why the Twitter IPO makes a shocking admission on scalability

2. Check that list, get interested

I could use the word “engage” but I feel it’s lost it’s meaning. The point here is that twitter is one giant conversation, among folks some known personally, and some only in the social sphere..

Comment on articles, add your opinion, or mention a quote or bit of the piece you thought really struck a nerve.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

3. Be helpful, share something you know

Don’t just charge in like a bull, asking for something. No one likes this in business. It’s why I’m frustrated sometimes with recruiters.

See a typo in a title or article, or something that might be awry? Spot a fact that needs clarification? Why not help a reporter out. LOL Think if you were hiring, what type of people would you most likely hire? Those who are helpful.

Read: Why high availability is so very hard to deliver

4. Strike while the iron is hot!

Making a connection is great. And not easy. So don’t go screwing it up asking for too much. Ask if they’re looking for guest bloggers, and who to talk to on your selected topic. Hopefully if you’re already working this hard for a publication, you’ve checked that!

When you have someone’s ear it’s important to avail yourself of it. Email offline, and share some topic ideas, and sexy titles. To me the title is the name of the game these days. Have some in mind. Show that you’re already playing with titles. If you get a good, vibe, write some new material

Read this: Why you should evaluate before hiring a consultant

5. Be open to criticism

Listen more than you speak and heed the guest posting guidelines.

Hear what the editor is suggesting, and be willing to move in a direction that might appeal to the largest audience.

Get something back in a few days. Extending the hot iron metaphor, no time like the present!

Good luck!

Read: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

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5 startup & scalability blogs I never miss – week 2

5 blogs week 2

Join 11,500 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Hunter Walk – Startups

If you want to have your finger on the pulse of startup land, there aren’t many better places to start than Hunter Walk’s 99% humble writings. Google finds his top posts on topics like AngelList, Advisors, and reinventing the movie theatre. Good writing, insiders view.

Read: NYC technology startups are hiring

Arnold Waldstein – Marketing

I first found Arnold’s blog using my trusty disqus discovery hack. He had written an interesting piece about new mobile shopping at popup stores like Kate Spade.

Follow him on Disqus, follow the blog, get the newsletter. All good stuff.

Read This: Why hiring is a numbers game

Claire Diaz Ortiz – Social Media

Claire writes a lot about social media, twitter & blogging. She wrote an excellent guide to increasing your pagerank, another on 30 important people to follow on twitter and more. She can even help you find a job.

Check out: Top MySQL DBA Interview questions for candidates, managers & recruiters

Bruce Schneier – Security

Bruce Schneier is one of the original bad boys of computer security. He writes about broad topics, that affect us all everyday from common sense about airport security, to the impacts of cryptography for you and me. Very worth looking at regularly, just to see what he’s paying attention to.

Also: Why operations & MySQL DBA talent is hard to find

Eric Hammond – Amazon Cloud

Eric Hammond has been writing about Amazon Web Services, EC2 & Ubuntu for years now. He maintains and releases some excellent AMIs, those are the machine images for spinning up new servers in Amazon’s cloud.

Even if you’re not big on the command line, you can get a lot of critical insight about the Amazon cloud by keeping up with his blog. Jeff Barr’s AWS blog is also good, but not nearly as critical and boots on the ground as Eric’s.

Also: 8 Questions to ask an AWS expert

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5 Superb blogs this week

Why wait for the new year to start something new? I come across a lot of great new blogs, while digging through the interwebs. So I thought I’d start a regular column to feature the best ones. We’ll including gems from web 2.0 industry, startups, business & management, and of course some technical devops & cloud computing ones.

Join 11,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Todd Hoff’s High Scalability

Todd Hoff’s High Scalability has been around for years, and offers up a cup of espresso for your infrastructure daily. From important topics like why you should avoid ORMs (Object Relational Modelers see post on technical debt) to regular scalability around the web posts to keep you on track.

He also features great articles under the title “real life architectures” from heavyweights such as facebook, twitter & youtube. These are the gold nuggets that are indispensable to devops and startups.

Read This: 5 Reasons Devops Should Blog

2. Albert Wenger’s Continuations

I was tipped off to Continuations using the Disqus commenting system’s discovery features. Click through to the community tab on say Fred Wilson’s AVC blog and you can find top commenters and where they blog at.

Wenger’s posts include such gems as Anatomy of a URL, giving a lay audience a little insight into the ubiquitous web paths and Computing Building Blocks which dissects the internet stack for everyone. As a partner at Union Square Ventures he’s obviously looped in with the big boys, but his writing style is so great he offers a model for technical bloggers everywhere.

Check out: A CTO Must Never Do This

3. Andrew Chen

Let’s face it Andrew Chen is the rock star I want to be! He’s got tons of organic followers on twitter, and reading his blog & newsletter it’s no surprise. He’s bright, and always provides Nate Silver style insights & new perspectives.

What is a minimal homepage, and how will it help me increase signups? Why can’t I seem to find a technical co-founder? What’s a minimum desirable product? You’ll see why Dave MacClure & Mitch Kapor work with him.

Read: AirBNB Didn’t Have to Fail – AWS Outage Postmortem

4. John Paul Aguiar

John’s website may appear a bit busy at first, but that’s just because it is so chock full of useful content. He offers very hands on, down in the trenches advice for bloggers & entrepreneurs. 150k followers on twitter, and articles that get retweeted hundreds of times, means he’s done the A/B testing, and learned to write clearly, and has great insights to share.

One thing he does is a weekly piece on entrepreneurs & users to follow on twitter. That great feature inspired this very post, not least because it offers a steady stream of things to write about, but because I was also featured there recently. I feel like I’ve hit the big time, thanks John!

Related: How to Hire a Developer That Doesn’t Suck

5. Krebs on Security

Brian Krebs is a bad boy. According to Bruce Schneier he apparently pissed someone off so bad, they had illegal substances sent to him through the mail in attempt to frame him.

Clearly his security research and writing is not appreciated by everyone. That said take a look at his website. You’d be shocked to learn what an ATM skimmer is, or what is the value of a hacked PC. Phishing, bots, email spam, gaming & reputation hijacking are just a few of the criminal activities that go on.

Also: The Myth of Five Nines

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5 Reasons Devops Should Blog

Join 9500 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Stand up and be heard

Years ago I was sitting on an online forum chatting with an Oracle buddy of mine. This was circa 1998. We were working on an open source tool to interface with Oracle. There were all these libraries, for PHP & Perl, and a lot of developers starting to build tools. We hatched this hair brained idea to write a book about all of this, and pitched it to O’Reilly. They loved it and thus was born the book Oracle & Open Source in 2001.

Writing a book was, is and always will be a lot of work. It was a great learning experience too. Editors critique your writing, and this teaches you to speak to a broader audience, clarify your statements, and including illustrations and stories.

Along with this came opportunities to speak at conferences, user groups and meetups. It’s exhilerating, and professionally challenging, and I enjoyed all of it.

Blogging allows you to do all of the above in a more measured way. Write regularly, get your ideas out there, get feedback, rinse & repeat. What’s more over time you’ll build up a library of material some of which will draw solid, strong, repeat traffic. It may be what you are most passionate about, what ideas you’ve ironed out smoothly, or what material is most missing from the we already. Whatever the reason your analytics will show you the way.

Read this: Database expert interview questions for candidates, recruiters & managers

2. Share your lessons

In professional services engagements, you learn something new everyday. After a few years you’ll have some battle scars & war stories too. For example I used to have a strong distrust of sales. But through real lessons in the feast or famine world of running your own business, you learn some survival instincts. And knowing how to sell your services & expertise is an art all to itself.

Also: A CTO Must Never Do This

[quote]
Getting up and taking a stand isn’t easy. You’ll receive criticism, and likely feel professionally vulnerable at first. But that only makes us stronger engineers, willing to listen, and better communicators.
[/quote]

3. Get opinionated

Taking a stand on controversial topics, is it something you want to do? Is it something you can do confidently, but also being open to criticism, and seeing all sides.

It’s challenging, but in that process it will either open you to new ideas, or make your resolve stronger. And that process is great for your professional development.

Also check out: AirBNB didn’t have to fail – don’t go down with Amazon

4. Withstand a sh*tstorm

Audiences keep you honest. If I were to go out on a limb I’d say technically brilliant, engineering audiences even more so.

I remember a post I did a year ago, which referenced a feature based on a wrong software version. In other words that feature would not work based on my article. The readers tore me to pieces in the comments.

But listen closely now, I’m saying that’s a good thing. Yes criticism is a very good thing indeed. Get enough of it, and you’ll learn to weed out the folks who are just trolls, from the ones with genuine suggestions. And all that makes you stronger!

Learn to listen a bit, and that makes you an even better sysadmin or devop.

Related: 5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

5. Learn by doing

Developers, ops, DBAs and Big Data jockeys alike are doers. We sit and code, build & configure components, troubleshoot & tune. Writing is descriptive and often it’s difficult for us to step back and describe what we’re doing.

By writing we carefully sift through our own thought processes to break it down for novices, or a broader audience. This is a learning process for us too. It’s therapeutic. But also it hones our message and makes us better teachers. We literally learn by doing.

Also: The Myth of Five Nines

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My DIY Disqus hack for blog discovery

I discovered disqus about a year ago while enjoying one of my favorite blogs, Fred Wilson’s AVC.

Believe it or not for a while I had it installed on my wordpress blog and thought it was pronouced DISK-OUS.

Join 5100 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

[mytweetlinks]

What disqus does beautifully

Disqus does a lot of things great. The first thing you realize is they remove a huge hurdle for users across the web. Managing multiple logins on blogs here and there, when you just want to comment. This is your first of many wins.

Bloggers can count on an increase in discussion, commenting & overall engagement. What’s more it reduces spam. Great!


Bloggers want traffic, thats one reason they spend their valuable time sharing their knowledge. Jumping in to Disqus is one great way to do that. More robust discovery can push this much further. Driving traffic traffic for all of us will drive adoption of disqus across the web.

Disqus provides a one-stop dashboard for all of this, and it’s wonderful for bloggers.

What i wanted more of…

I found myself using disqus, but wondering…

o bloggers – who are the big shots?
o how do I find opinion minded people?
o how do I find intelligent discourse?
o can I encourage more discussions on my blog?
o I want web audiences discovering Sean Hull’s Scalable Startups
o How do I search – for this article, a comment that I posted?

I found myself keeping a list of disqus blogs. I would follow these blogs around the web, and thought – Why am I doing this? Why isn’t this part of the software? What am I intuitively searching for?

Why is database administration talent in short supply? They are the Mythical MySQL DBAs

A call for @disqushelp on twitter

I posted a request for info on twitter. @disqushelp was quick to point me to their Disqus Gravity Project. As I commented on the designing disqus gravity blog post it is a wonderful tool and proof of concept. It sure illustrates where disqus is taking things and the important visualization possible. But unfortunately it wasn’t helping me. 🙁

Also take a look at: Why Generalists are Better at Scaling the Web

How I hacked disqus digest emails

I was receiving the disqus digest emails. I think when you signup you automatically get those. I was mostly just deleting them, as they didn’t have much of interest in them. Then I started clicking through, and realized – hey wait, Disqus is kind of doing what I want already. They just need a little help.

I decided to go to some of my favorite blogs. I visited AVC, RWW, Wired, HBR, businessweek, computerworld, chrisbrogan.com and scrolled down to disqus comments. I then clicked “community” tab. Along the right side you’ll see the most active commenters. I then clicked through to their disqus profiles, and “followed” them just like you might do on Twitter.

Also: How I increased my blog pagerank to 5

After doing this for the top 5 commenters on ten to fifteen blogs, my disqus digests emails started bringing me new blogs! This is super cool. I’ve discovered some Venture, some technical and some iPhone blogs I never new about.

What was missing – discovery

Discovery is tech vernacular for what I was doing. Scouring the web for subject matter experts was exactly what I was doing. Picking the ones that used disqus allowed me to share my thoughts and weigh in across the spectrum of topics I knew well.

Disqus digests came up short for some people. But after I started using the follow feature, suddenly blogs and authors were popping up on my radar. Exactly what I wanted.

Keep up the good work guys. Would love to see the iPhone app if in fact it’s under development!

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A Pagerank of 5 Is Possible – Here's How

Join 4500 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

A highly trafficked website is a valuable asset indeed. For a services business it helps you build reputation and reach prospects.

Here’s how to get there.

1. Longevity

We’ve been around for a while, as you can see from a quick whois search below. I’ve owned the web property (aka domain name) iheavy.com and used it for the same purpose, since July 1999! Google notices this and ranks accordingly.

Until 2011 I wasn’t blogging much. I had a pagerank of 3 though. That’s attributable to two factors:

o 12 years owning the domain at that time

o Writing a book for O’Reilly which got a strong backlink

[code]
$ whois iheavy.com

Registered through: GoDaddy.com, LLC (http://www.godaddy.com)
Domain Name: IHEAVY.COM
Created on: 14-Jul-99
Expires on: 14-Jul-15
Last Updated on: 18-Feb-13

Registrant:
iHeavy, Inc.
Box 5352
New York, New York 10185
United States

Administrative Contact:
Hull, Sean [email protected]
iHeavy, Inc.
Box 5352
New York, New York 10185
United States
+1.2125336828
[/code]

2. Authored a Technical Book (pagerank 3)

I authored a book for O’Reilly in 2001 called Oracle and Open Source. This bumped up our ranking from a flat 1 because we got backlinks from O’Reilly’s author blog, a strong authoritative signal to Google.

Why is database administration talent in short supply? They are the Mythical MySQL DBA

Here’s Why I Wrote the Book on Oracle & Open Source.

[quote]
Consistent ownership and use of a domain name, along with backlinks from other authorities in your area of expertise weigh strongly in your favor.
[/quote]

3. Started blogging weekly

In Spring of 2011 I started blogging regularly. This was an effort to build out my services business, solidify my voice, and bring prospects and customers to my site.

[mytweetlinks]

4. Installed Google Analytics & Feedburner

It might seem crazy but to that point I didn’t track much. Without metrics you don’t know which pages users are visiting, how long they’re staying, or where they’re converting.

Also take a look at: Why Generalists are Better at Scaling the Web

A conversion – for those out of the analytics loop – is when a user does something you want them to do. For an e-commerce site, they buy or start the process of buying. For a services website it could be visiting your about page, downloading a pdf or e-book, or signing up for a newsletter.

5. WordPress SEO plugin

WordPress is a great publishing platform. Among the many plugins to choose from, Yoast SEO is a very important one to include. It exposes all the hidden SEO fields and functions in a powerful way. Edit your short description, keywords & categories, and a lot more.

Check out: A CTO Must Never Do This

It also helps you frame and think about how your content is seen both by search engines, and searchers alike.

6. Keyword research

A little keyword research goes a long way. You might be a subject matter expert in a given field, but if you don’t know how your customers search, you can’t help them find you. Remember they don’t know what you do, so likely don’t know jargony terms or the vernacular your expertise uses within.

SEO Moz has some great tools to help you, along with Wordtracker and Google has a keyword research tool for adwords.

[quote]
Strong titles should make you click to open the post. A dash of keyword research and regularly watching your analytics should be revealing. Give your readers what they want!
[/quote]

See also: My Blog Traffic is Growing Using these 5 Killer Tactics

7. Watch your analytics (pagerank 4)

After about six months of regular blogging, and a few viral hits, our pagerank went up to 4. What was I doing? All of the above, plus watching analytics closely. I asked myself questions about visitors:

o Which pages do they like and why?
o What causes them to stick around?
o What causes bounce rate to go down?
o What causes them to convert?

I found that adding links to relevant content right in the text helped reduce bounce rate right away. This was a real discovery that I could apply everyday.

Hiring a Cloud Engineer? Get our 8 Questions to Ask an AWS Expert for Recruiters, Managers & candidates alike

I also noticed that good content helped, but directly imploring readers to signup to the newsletter got regular conversions daily. Huh, that was a surprise since all along I had the signup form along the right column. Go figure.

8. Guest posting

Guest posting is great. It allows you to work with real publications who have paid editors. These folks with provide you with a more professional view, and that is great for your own writing and understanding your audience. The hardest thing to learn is how to write to a broad audience.

You’ll also of course get a backlink which is a major authority signal to the search engines. You might get paid a bit too, but your mileage may very.

I managed to do some regular writing for INFOWORLD and Database Journal. I wrote one piece for ChangeThis.com called Get Out of the Technology Hex.

From there I signed a syndication deal with Developer Zone. Since I have embedded links to content, that brings me regular traffic, even besides my profile, and the authoritative backlink.

Lately I’m working on some stuff for Gigaom and ACM’s Queue. Steady as she goes!

9. Get on the aggregators

Most likely your industry has some sort of aggregator site which will carry your RSS syndication feed. Get on those. That will drive regular traffic and RSS feedburner subscribers. We’re on Planet MySQL and it’s been great!

10. Patience, rinse and repeat

Easier said than done, I know. If you want this to happen overnight, you had better get onto the real world celebrity track. Otherwise work on your content, work on your voice, write clicky titles and keep your audience interested with solid content. And watch your traffic grow!

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