Consulting outside my pay grade

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I recently worked with a customer migrating to Azure. Part of the plan was to take advantage of various free credits available on Azure. That’s not a bad reason cost wise, as long as the engineering cost of migration is considered.

Then I dug further…

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Sean: Why are you migrating to Azure?
Customer: We’re getting free credit from Microsoft. Also we must not have any services on AWS.
Sean: Why is that?
Customer: We are trying to close to a deal with Walmart. Of course they’re a big fish for us and we don’t want to lose them.
Sean: Ummm… let’s take a closer look at that.

o we need to migrate because our future customer is in a pissing match with AWS
o sales should not blindly drive tech decisions
o there will always be some things on AWS
o if you’re going to be non-technically pure then just say yes we have *everything* off of AWS and keep running your business
o if sales can lie, then go ahead and blow the smoke up there

You can’t be completely free of AWS

While the sales team thought that was a simple directive, they forgot a few details.

1. There is a financial cost to the business to migrate from AWS to Azure
2. There is a technical risk of migrating from AWS to Azure
3. There are hidden and unforeseen technical costs as things fail, or code unravels.
4. As you have THIRD PARTY apps, you are using AWS, such as Slack, Salesforce, Zoom, Dropbox, Jira and perhaps many others.
5. Internet traffic flows through aws networks.

Read: The myth of five nines – why high availability is overated

Sales & engineering have different mandates

Sales teams are driven in a different way than engineers. Their day-to-day is about closing deals, and so priorities are different. What’s more the grasp of technical minutiae may not always be as deep.

This is not a criticism, more an observation. So too engineers don’t understand the realities of sales, and closing deals.

That said you get into the danger zone when sales driven calculation pushes the business to make a bad decision.

The engineering marvel is what holds up the bridge. So it doesn’t make sense to skip the inspections, or leave out trusses because a customer said the bridge will look prettier that way. The engineers must have serious input on technology decisions.

That will then help the business make a balanced decision, one that considers the true costs involved.

Read: Relational Database – What is it and why is it important?

Engineering & Sales should be cooperative

One should not outweigh or outmuscle the other. Their needs to be a balance of concerns. A big chunk of business that doubles the underlying revenue may be worth large tech stack changes.

But there is also a risk that the house of cards comes tumbling down. Even if the reengineering risks are managed, the new debts owed by Rome could still take you down.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

How does pay grade come in?

In the above case I was hired to do a migration. I wasn’t hired to think strategically about the business.

So some might argue that is stepping outside the mandate or scope of work. That said I do try to offer opinions where they make sense. In this case it may be of value to the business.

However, since it is “outside my pay grade” I would offer it humbly, and gently. No sense shooting yourself in the foot. ๐Ÿ™‚

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

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