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What hidden things does a deposit reveal?

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I like this idea of how integration tests in software development show you that everything is working and connected together properly.

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I think it’s interesting to consider how a deposit may serve a similar function across the financial space & contractual space.

1. Alignment across business units

In really small organizations, everyone is in tight communication. Finance knows what engineering is doing. In medium to large organizations, there can be a disconnect. Engineering may be 100% ready to start today, but finance is not ready. In some cases finance may not even know a consultant is being hired. Each case is different.

Some CTOs get this right away, and are already ahead of the request. While others might ask, “Well we’re ready to get going today, do you really need the deposit first? Because that might take some time.”

My thinking is, yes the engineering department is ready, but the organization is *not* completely ready. And it’s better that there be alignment across the organization. Ironing out that alignment, helps avoid other problems later on.

Related: When you have to take the fall

2. Organization or disorganization

Sometimes there is complete alignment, the contract is already ready, and the whole org really is ready to go. In other cases there can be some disfunction. For instance the lawyers have a lot of hoops that want us to jump through, in terms of a contract.

In other cases finance may only cut checks on a certain day of the month, or only pay 30 days after receiving an invoice. There are a lot of different policies. By insisting that we receive a deposit, however small, we iron out these things early.

If the engineering manager or CTO hiring you promises one thing, but finance has a policy against that, you’ll want to know early to avoid misunderstandings.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Trust

The amount of a deposit is really irrelevant. It’s all about getting ducks in a row. Both in terms of what may be required of you the vendor, and what the company’s policies may be when onboarding consultants.

By ironing out these issues early, the customer is showing some faith in you as a vendor. They want you in particular, and will do what they need to, to make it work.

Related: Is AGILE right for fixing performance issues?

4. We want you to rush, but we don’t

I’ve encountered many cases where engineering was “ready” but finance was not. It’s tough. From the perspective of the CTO it may be a moot point to get stuck on.

My thought is to hold the frame of two organizations working together. When the organization has alignment that hiring this engineering resource is a priority, it will get things done that it needs to.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

5. Stress tests or organizational integration tests

In software testing, we have something called an integration test. It might be confirming that a login works, or a certain page can load. Behind the scenes that test requires the database to be running, the queuing system to work, an API call to return successfully, and so on. A lot of moving parts all have to be working for that test to succeed.

In a very real way, a deposit is the financial equivalent of an integration test. It confirms that we’re all aligned in the ways we need to, and are ready to get started.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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All Consulting CTO/CIO

Walking the delicate balance of transparency

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I’ve written before about How I use progress reports to stay on track.

Join 38,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I think it’s an interesting topic, and an important one.

While I do believe transparency is important when working with clients, that doesn’t mean it’s easy.

1. I start with daily notes

As I mentioned above I think they’re important. They provide visibility, improve trust, and keep me on track. They also help me remember what was happening on particular days. They’re like breadcrumbs on the path to building solutions.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

2. Notes can highlight organizational dysfunction

Often in my notes, there are details of who I coordinate to get what done. Perhaps I need credentials to reach a particular server. But to get those, I need an email address. And to get that, someone in department X must set that up. And there are delays with that process.

Those delays can cascade through the onboarding process, frustrating everyone. Although the operations team is read and raring to go, the finance or legal team is not quite ready, and there are delays there. Or there are hiccups in some other frequent business process.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Notes can highlight task complexity

Sometimes I hear the phrase “That should be simple to do”. Only to find the devil buried in the details. As we put boots on the ground, we find there are many dependent tasks that are not finished. So those must be completed first.

In this case I think complexity of notes is a real triumph. For CTOs that are more management oriented, they may not have day-to-day understanding of coding complexity. And that’s ok. But when that complexity is laid out in all it’s gory detail it can be a real educational experience.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

4. For some CTOs high level is better

For some CTOs, they don’t want to slog through endless notes about setting up credentials, or problems with permissions of keys on server X or Y.

While in these cases I still collect the detail, I may also add some high level bullet points, that focus on what all these underlying parts are in service of.

Related: When you have to take the fall

5. Be prepared for archeological surprises

Inevitably there will be surprises. Whether department X does not know what department Y is doing. Or whether setting up an aws account takes two days, instead of two hours. Be prepared.

Inevitably I find these all help communication. And since I’ve been keeping them, I’ve never had a customer balk at an invoice. Notes don’t lie!

Related: Why i ask for a deposit

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