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All Consulting CTO/CIO

How do you handle the onboarding at a new engagement?

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Jumping into the fray at a new firm is never easy. You’ll have new people’s names to remember, new web dashboards to login to, to bookmark, etc. New passwords to remember, new workflows to learn.

Join 38,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

While fulltime folks typically onboard logins in a week, and don’t contribute code for a month or more, consultant engagements mean hitting the ground running.

Here’s what I try to manage, when first diving in.

1. Deposit & agreement

When I start at a new engagement, I require a deposit. There are a lot of moving parts to that happening. In engineering speak, it acts like an integration test across your entire organization. All the departments must be aligned. Legal with the agreement language. Finance with the banking details, and invoice. CTO or manager with a clear picture of scope of work.

In getting past that first hurdle, both parties, will express their working style. And usually there are compromises that must be made on both sides. But the effort each one makes is essential to a strong and equitable relationship that you’re both working to build.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

2. Over communicate

Sometimes your teammate doesn’t know you’re also working to get things over to legal. And legal doesn’t know you’re working with finance. And finance doesn’t know you’re trying to tune a database. And the network admin doesn’t know your email address isn’t setup.

When in down over communicate. Don’t be afraid to repeat in an email what you thought you’d communicated clearly on slack. Sometimes slack messages are missed, as there are so many that get thrown around. It’s easy to miss a notification.

When in down, communicate again. Ask for clarification. Ask if there is anything someone may be waiting on.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Keep daily notes

I’m a big fan of providing daily progress reports. There is a hell of a lot of detail buried in most tasks, and much of that gets lost in the shuffle.

Putting together your own notes of what your day looked like can help management understand that complexity. It can also help communicate where the organization is getting stuck. Sometimes surprises here can help unblock the org in other ways.

Related: Why i ask for a deposit

4. Beware the Slack rabbit hole

Slack can at times be a blessing, allowing you to reach someone immediately, but also sometimes be a curse. Have I seen every notification? Does the person who posted a note *assume* that I saw it? Which thread was that detail posted in anyway?

I personally like to repeat a lot of communications in email. From a consulting perspective this is also essential as it provides me a paper trail of what conversations we had. Remember once an engagement is completed, you lose the entire Slack message thread. That’s not true of email.

Related: When you have to take the fall

5. Anticipate login issues

Typically at the start of an engagement there is an email setup, and other authentication hangs off of that one. AWS confirms via email, or perhaps there is an SSO solution like OKTA. Inevitably, these interconnected pieces take time to setup. And one will hit a snag slowing down your over all onboarding.

Expect hiccups and challenges in this process. It’s normal for it to take some days. Imagine that FT hires typically onboard in a week, and don’t contribute code for a month or more. So keep everything in perspective on these points.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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All CTO/CIO Hiring

How I use 5 daily habits to help me stay on track

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Join 38,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. Keep a tight todo list

I shoot for five tasks on my todo list. Be sure they are small, 15-30 minute tasks because things have a way of ballooning. If what you’re doing takes longer, break it down into smaller pieces. This keeps you moving, and always making progress.

You might be tempted to have more items. But chances are you’ll spend an hour on emails and time on phone calls, and other distractions. And there will be preemptive tasks that suddenly require your attention. So keeping this list small, allows you to hit close to 100% success.

Sure there will be days when you’re *more* productive. It doesn’t hurt to pull some items off the long term list. 🙂

Related: When you have to take the fall

2. Zero inbox

I’m relentless about this. Terse replies, stay focused, and remember the reward you’ll give yourself when you finish your day.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Take a break every hour or two

Smokers have an easy time with this. And perhaps coffee drinkers. If you’re anyone else, you may get into the habit of staying in your chair. Don’t. Regular breaks promote creative thinking, and physically moving helps get the mind in motion too.

Sometimes when I work in a coffeeshop I don’t bring my charger. That way I’m forced to take a break when the battery runs low.

Related: Why i ask for a deposit

4. Reward yourself

Pat yourself on the back when you complete all your tasks. If it’s 4pm, so be it. Jet a bit early. You know there will be other days when you’re working until 8pm too. Promise yourself something when you finish. A treat, or a stroll through the park, or an extra ten minutes to walk your dog, or a frosty IPA. Whatever it is, rewards help remind is we’ve done well.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

5. Always be networking

If you’re in a FT role, you may do most of your socializing with coworkers. That’s fine, but be sure to go to some regular meetups too. And followup with people. Maybe even give a few talks now and then. Networking is the most surefire way to build your career and always be growing. And it’s a little bit each day that it takes to build lasting momentum.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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All Cloud Computing CTO/CIO Data Database Operations Devops

How can we keep cloud architectures simple?

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I was reading hacker news, as I often do. And I found David Futcher’s post You Don’t Need all That Complex/Expensive/Distracting Infrastructure..

Of course it caught my attention. You may be surprised by the reasons

Join 38,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

One quote that should raise your eyebrows…

I’ve seen the idea that every minute spent on infrastructure is a minute less spent shipping features

Here’s what I think…

1. Performance tuning is often about removing things

That sounds strange right? How can performance tuning be about removing things?

Here are a few examples:

o removing results: When you add an index you remove data, returning just the pieces you need.
o removing lag time: When you remove time, you get faster response. This cascades through your entire application, allowing more requests to get handled in a fixed amount of time. On AWS you get allocated a faster NIC when you use a larger instance size. It’s automatic, though somewhat invisible.
o removing data: By trimming tables, access speeds go up. Reads are faster when you hit the whole table, because there’s fewer records to sift through. Writes are faster because you are maintaining smaller associated indexes.
o removing codepaths: By having fewer libraries, and layers between your application, and the data it retrieves, you have less overhead. And that translates to quicker response time too.
o removing databases: If you’re fully microservices, you have a database behind every service. This means your service sometimes proxies just to get at data that has been decoupled. By consolidating databases to a shared db model, you reduce this cross-traffic dramatically.

Related: When you have to take the fall

2. Are we just building what everyone else does?

In technology as with any other industry, following the big trends is safe. If you’re building an architecture that is used by Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix & Google are using, you’re on the best path, right? Certainly few would criticise their success. So yes it is safe. Even if it fails.

Going with a much simpler architecture, that has even a whiff of so-called legacy, may seem like bucking the trend. But fewer moving parts means less to break, less to manage, and less to tune.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

3. Customers don’t care

Remember, customers aren’t devops gurus nor do they care about Rust versus Swift versus Elixir. What they care about is they can comment on their social media app or order your widget. They want your product to work.

They don’t care if it is hosted in the cloud, or at a managed datacenter. They probably don’t even care about tiny short outages either. What they do care about is that it works, and works well. And fast.

If your infrastructure allows you to be responsive to customers, roll out new product features & updates, you’re going to have some happy customers. The end!

Related: Why i ask for a deposit

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters