Tag Archives: startups

Is AWS too complex for small dev teams & startups?

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I was discussing a server outage with a colleague recently. AWS had done some confusing things, and the team was rallying to troublehsoot & fix.

He made an offhand comment that caught my attention…


AWS is too complex for small dev teams. I’d recommend we host in a traditional datacenter.

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It’s an interesting point. For all the fanfare over Amazon, lost in the shuffle is the staggering complexity that we’re taking on. For small firms, this is a cost that’s often forgotten when we smell the on-demand cool-aid that is EC2.

Here are my thoughts…

1. Over 70 services offered

Everytime I login to the AWS console there’s a new service offering. Lambda & serverless computing. CodeDeploy, Redshift, EMR, VPC’s, developer tools, IOT, the list goes on. If you haven’t enabled MFA on your IAM accounts you’re not alone!

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. Still complex to build high availability

The song I hear out of Amazon is, we offer all the components for a high availability infrastructure. multiple availability zones, regions, load balancers, autoscaling, geo & latency dns routing. What’s more companies like Netflix have open sourced tools to help.

But at a lot of startups that I see, all these components are not in use, nor are they well understood. Many admins are still using Amazon like an old-school datacenter. And that’s not good.

Sometimes it seems that AWS is a patient in need of constant medication.

Related: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

3. Need a dedicated devops

As AWS becomes more complex, and the offering more robust, so too the need for dedicated ops. If you’re devs are already out of bandwidth, but you don’t quite have so much need for a fulltime resource a consultant may be an option. Round out the team & keep costs manageable.

If you’re looking for an aws solutions architect, we can help!

Check out: Does Amazon eat it’s own dogfood?

4. Orchestration involves many moving parts

Infrastructure as code offers the promise of completely versioning all your servers, configurations and changes. From there we can apply test driven development & bring a more professional level of service to our business. That’s the theory anyway.

In practice it brings an incredible number of new toolsets to master and a more complex stack besides. All those components can have bugs, need troubleshooting. This sometimes just kicks the can down the road, moving the complexity elsewhere.

It’s not clear that for smaller shops, all this complexity is manageable.

Also: 5 things toxic to scalability

5. Troubleshooting failed deployments

I was looking at a problem with a broken deploy recently. Turns out a developer had copy & pasted some code solution off the internet, possibly from a tutorial, and broke deployments to staging.

Yes perhaps this was avoidable, and more checks & balances can fix. But my thought is continuous integration & continuous deployments are not a panacea. More complexity brings a more complex web to unweave.

I sometimes wonder if we aren’t fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

Read: Why Airbnb didn’t have to fail?

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What events are good for tech & startup networking in New York City?

garys guide events

I’ve worked in the NYC startup scene since the mid-nineties. It seems to keep growing every year, and there are so many events it’s hard to keep track.

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Here’s where to look for the best stuff.

1. Gary’s Guide

Gary Sharma hosts an authoritative guide to all the events in the new york tech & startup scene. It’s sort of the one-stop shop for knowing what’s going on.

Lucky for us, in a city the size of new york, there’s an opportunity to meet & network with people everyday of the week.

Also: 5 core pieces of the Amazon cloud puzzle to get your project off the ground

2. Meetups

Meetup.com is another invaluable resource. There are technical groups & social ones, and plenty of niche groups to for specific areas of interest.

For example there’s NYC Tech Talks, NY Women in Tech, Tech for good & NY Entrepreneurs & Startup Network. There are plenty more.

Related: Some thoughts on 12-factor apps

3. Eventbrite

A lot of events us Eventbrite for ticketing, so it turns out to be a great place to search. Some of the startup related events .

Read: Why dropbox didn’t have to fail

4. Techdrinkup

Michael Gold’s #techdrinkup event keeps getting bigger & better. More social hour than presentations & such, you’re sure to bump elbows with some folks in NY’s exploding tech scene.

Take a look at some of the event photos on their facebook page.

Also: How do hackers secure their Amazon Web Services account?

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What happens when entrepreneurs treat data as a product?

Sneachta Pix
Sneachta Pix

I’ve been reading DJ Patil’s thoughts on building data products. As the chief data scientist of the united states, he knows a thing or two.

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I also attended a recent Look & Tell event, where Lincoln Ritter talked about Data Democracy at Animoto. He expressed many of Patil’s lessons.

I took away a few key lessons from these that seem to be repeating refrains…

1. UX of data

UX design involves looking at how customers actually use a product in the real world. What parts of the product work for them, how they flow through that product and so on.

That same design sense can be applied to data. At high level that means exposing data in a measured, meaningful & authoritative way. Not all the tables & all the data points but rather key ones that help the business make decisions. Then layering on top discovery tools like Looker to allow the biz-ops to make more informed decisions.

Also: 5 Reasons to move data to Amazon Redshift

2. Be iterative

Clean data, presented to business operations in a meaningful way, allows them to explore the data, and find useful trends. What’s more with good discovery tools, biz-ops is empowered to do their own reporting.

All this reduces the need to go to engineering for each report. It reduces friction and facilitates faster iteration. That’s agile!

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Be authoritative

Handing the keys to the data kingdom over to business means more eyes on the prize. That may well surface data inconsistencies. Each such case can reduce trust on your data.

Being authoritative means building checks into your data feeds, and identifying where data is amiss. Then fixing it at the source.

Read: Are SQL Databases dead?

4. Spot checks & balances

Spot checks on data are like unit tests on code. They keep you honest. Those rules for how your business works, and what your data should look like, can be captured in code, then applied as tests against source data.

Also: Is Apple betting against big data?

5. Monitoring for data outages

As data is treated as a product, it should be monitored just like other production systems. A data inconsistency or failed spot check then becomes an “outage”. By taking these very seriously, and fire fighting just as you do other production systems, you can build trust in that data, as those fires become less frequent.

Also: Why Airbnb didn’t have to fail

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5 Things I learned from Fred Wilson & Mark Suster

I was recently flipping through AVC.com and saw this interview by Mark Suster of Upfront Ventures. He talks in depth with veteran in the VC world, Fred Wilson.

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Here’s a more in-depth blog post on Mark’s interview with Fred Wilson from Union Square Ventures.

1. I’m not into debt

Around the 20:25 in the interview, Fred is discussing a period in his career before some of his first big investments, where things were financially challenging. He makes a rather candid comment about personal debt:

“I’m not that kinda person. I don’t like debt. I’m not into debt”

I think this is key. I also think it frames the whole way people approach business & career.

Also: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

2. Brains & hustle is key

Among the most successful entrepreneurs there are certainly many who are very intellectually astute. Meanwhile there are others who are great speakers, who can sell an idea, and persuade, but perhaps not as deep product wise or deeply technical.

The very best though, tend to have both brains & hustle.

Related: 8 questions to ask an AWS expert

3. Best technology doesn’t win markets

Around 11:45 in the interview, Mark & Fred are discussing Novell & Banyan.

“That was when I learned that best technology doesn’t win markets”

t’s interesting because as you hear the story of how Banyan lost out to Novell, it resonates today with companies that often have the best tech, but don’t win in markets. Interesting.

Read: Why Airbnb didn’t have to fail

4. Find answers through blogging

“It’s like Venus Fly Paper. When I write about topics that are relevant, suddenly anybody with a startup solution in that field will approach us. This works brilliantly.”

Indeed, I’ve found blogging to be crucial myself to career building. It helps in a myriad of ways.

Blogging brings visibility, as your blog gains in popularity. That is certainly big. But also it helps you craft & formalize your voice & your vision. Blogging asks you everyday to think about your perspective, and share it in a way that appeals to a broad audience. And analytics give you real feedback that you are saying something of value to people.

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Listen to the younger generation

Around 1:11:15 in the interview, there’s an interesting point where Mark asks Fred if there were any deals that they regret not getting into. Fred responds that AirBNB was such a deal, as it was a quintessential Union Square ventures company.

As it turns out they didn’t invest because they couldn’t imagine using the service. Meanwhile the younger members of their team had a different perspective.

“We’re not gonna reject anything that we wouldn’t do and the younger team would.”

Interesting point. I think of Venmo as another example of this. I personally wouldn’t use the service, meanwhile it is clearly very popular among teen & twenty something demographic.

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

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5 Things Frans Johansson says about innovation

medici affect johansson

You may not have heard of Medici before, but you’ve probably heard of the renaissance. The medici family hosted the round tables, the meetups, the social gatherings & mixers. They brought diverse artisans engineers & thinkers together, and the world hasn’t been the same since!

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In the Medici Effect, Frans dissects what this famous family did. His case studies include the likes of Richard Branson, Deepak Chopra, Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, Orit Gadiesh, Marcus Samuelsson, George Soros & our own favorite Linus Torvalds,

What he discovered really surprised me.

1. Swim at the intersection

Hanging out with folks in your field is great. Whether you’re a physician, financial analyst, Ruby programmer, or artist. But it won’t expose us to enough new ideas. To get that, you need to hang out with those in other disciplines. Learn a language, take dance classes, try your hand at a new sport, or attend meetups of wedding planners or DJs. Whatever it takes to get out of your comfort zone is what will put you at the intersection.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

2. You need quantity to get quality

This was a very surprising finding of their research. One might think that greats like Albert Einstein were geniuses from the start. But it turns out one consistent factor between all these folks is the quantity of their attempts. They came up with many many ideas, and chased as many as they could. Of course they are only remembered for their successes, but this hides the underlying mathematics. It’s a numbers game in almost all of these cases.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

3. Peel all the potatoes and cook them together

Peel one potato and cook it. Then peel another and cook it. Doesn’t sound like a recipe for efficiently preparing dinner does it? Turns out it’s also not great for innovating. Peel & prepare many ideas at once, and try to execute them in parallel if you can. That’s what these greats have done.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

4. Be ok with more failures

This is a tricky one. But Johansson puts in perspective with this key quote:

”Inaction is far worse than failure.”

Viewed that way, our caution about diving into a new idea seems more limiting. True it costs money, time & resources to pursue new ideas, ventures & startups. So be sure to reserve resources. That’s right spend that money & time carefully lest you run out before hitting on the big one.

He also says to be suspicious of low failure rates. In yourself or those you’re evaluating. This probably indicates you’re not risking enough, or trying new things constantly.

Read this: Why Oracle Won’t Kill MySQL

5. break out of your network

Your network is powerful to pursue your career, or following existing well traveled paths. But they can be an obstacle when forging new paths, which is what innovation is all about.

So break away from your networks. One way you can do this is by building a new one. But be sure to surround yourself with diverse cultures, upbringing, backgrounds & expertise.

Also: RDS or MySQL 10 Use Cases

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25 Rumsfelds Rules for Startups

RumsfeldsRules

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While we are still deep in the woods of a government shutdown, I thought it would be interesting to sum up some of our former Defense Secretary’s words of wisdom.

Rumsfeld may not have done everything right, but some of his quotes are priceless. What’s more they appeal to Startups quite nicely…

1 If you are working from your inbox, you are working on other people’s priorities.

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2 Men count up the faults of those who keep them waiting.

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3 In unanimity, there may well be either cowardice or uncritical thinking.

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4 Test ideas in the marketplace. You learn from hearing a range of perspectives.

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5. You can’t recover a fumble unless you’re on the field. Get out there.

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Read this: Why the Twitter IPO mentioned scalability

6. First law of holes. If you get in one, stop digging.

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7. Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.

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8. You pay the same price for doing something halfway as for doing it completely so you might as well do it completely.

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9. It is difficulties that show what men are.

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10. What you measure, improves.

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Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

11. If you are lost, “climb, conserve and confess”

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12. It is not the strongest species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

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13. Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

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14. People don’t spend money earned by others with the same care that they spend their own.

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15. Disagreement is not disloyalty.

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Related: Why a CTO must never do this

16. A lie travels halfway around the world before the truth gets its shoes on.

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17. It is easier to convince someone they’re right, than to convince them they’re wrong.

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18. Your best question is often why.

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19. Simply because a problem is shown to exist, it doesn’t necessarily follow that there is a solution.

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20. The world is run by those who show up.

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Read: Who is Sean Hull?

21. Don’t panic. Things may be going better than they seem from the inside.

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22. Know that the amount of criticism you receive may correlate closely to the amount of publicity you get.

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23. Sunshine is a weather report, a flood is news.

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24. If you expect people to be in on the landing, include them in the takeoff.

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25. If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.

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Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

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5 startup & scalability blogs I never miss – week 2

5 blogs week 2

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Hunter Walk – Startups

If you want to have your finger on the pulse of startup land, there aren’t many better places to start than Hunter Walk’s 99% humble writings. Google finds his top posts on topics like AngelList, Advisors, and reinventing the movie theatre. Good writing, insiders view.

Read: NYC technology startups are hiring

Arnold Waldstein – Marketing

I first found Arnold’s blog using my trusty disqus discovery hack. He had written an interesting piece about new mobile shopping at popup stores like Kate Spade.

Follow him on Disqus, follow the blog, get the newsletter. All good stuff.

Read This: Why hiring is a numbers game

Claire Diaz Ortiz – Social Media

Claire writes a lot about social media, twitter & blogging. She wrote an excellent guide to increasing your pagerank, another on 30 important people to follow on twitter and more. She can even help you find a job.

Check out: Top MySQL DBA Interview questions for candidates, managers & recruiters

Bruce Schneier – Security

Bruce Schneier is one of the original bad boys of computer security. He writes about broad topics, that affect us all everyday from common sense about airport security, to the impacts of cryptography for you and me. Very worth looking at regularly, just to see what he’s paying attention to.

Also: Why operations & MySQL DBA talent is hard to find

Eric Hammond – Amazon Cloud

Eric Hammond has been writing about Amazon Web Services, EC2 & Ubuntu for years now. He maintains and releases some excellent AMIs, those are the machine images for spinning up new servers in Amazon’s cloud.

Even if you’re not big on the command line, you can get a lot of critical insight about the Amazon cloud by keeping up with his blog. Jeff Barr’s AWS blog is also good, but not nearly as critical and boots on the ground as Eric’s.

Also: 8 Questions to ask an AWS expert

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Understand the High Cost of Technical Debt by Ward Cunningham (Video)

A week or two ago, I got into a conversation on Twitter about technical debt, and someone shared this superb video by Ward Cunningham (youtube). Here is Ward’s Interview website.

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Waterfall, agile, developer or operations, devops, managers, CTOs… everyone should watch this video, for it cuts to the heart of the challenges we face doing modern software development, in a fast paced and always changing environment.

Though it’s not mentioned in the video, I would argue using an ORM is an expensive form of debt, one that is improperly calculated by teams, managers & startups, and one that bites hard into future scalability. Stay tuned for a post about that!

Enough said, here’s the video.

Here’s the transcript of much of the dialog. Appologies for any typos…

1. Metaphors & Thinking

I became interested in the way metaphors influence the way we think

after reading George Lakoff & Mark Johnson’s Metaphors We Live By (Amazon).

An important idea is that we reason by analogy through the metaphors that have entered our language.

Related: 5 Things Toxic to Scalability.

2. Coining Debt Metaphor

I coined the debt metaphor to explain the refactoring we were doing on a product.

This was an early product done in smalltalk. It was important to me that we accumulate the learnings we did about the application by modifying the program to look as if we had known what we were doing all along. And to look as if it had been easy to do in smalltalk.

The explanation I gave to my boss, and this was financial software, was a financial analogy I called the debt metaphor and that said that:

[quote]
If we failed to make our program align with what we then understood to be the proper way to think about our fin objects, then we were going to continue to stumble on that disagreement which is like paying interest on a loan. -Ward Cunningham
[/quote]

Also: AirBNB didn’t have to fail when Amazon went down.

3. Need for Speed

With borrowed money you can do something sooner than you might otherwise, but until you pay back that money you will pay interest.

I thought borrowing money was a good idea. I thought that rushing software out the door to get some experience with it was a good idea. But that of course you would eventually go back and as you learned things about that software you would repay that loan by refactoring the program to reflect your experience as you acquired it.

Read this: Why generalists are better at scaling the web.

4. Understand the Burden

I think that there were plenty of cases where people would rush things soft out the door & learn things, but never put that learning back into the program. That by analogy was borrowing money thinking you never had to pay it back. of course If you do that you know say with your credit card, evemtually all your income goes to interest & your purchasing power goes to zero.

By the same token if you dev a program for a long period of time, by only adding features, and never reorganizing it to reflect your understanding of those features, then eventually that program does not contain any understanding and all efforts to work on it take longer and longer. In other words the interest is total. You’ll make zero progress.

Check out: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck.

5. Achieving Agility

a lot of bloggers at least have explained the debt metaphor and confused it i think with the idea that you could write code poorly with the intention of doing a good job later. and thinking that that was the pirmary source of deb.t I’m never in favor of writing code poorly. But I am in favor of writing a code to reflect your current understanding of a problem even if your understanding is partial.

If you want to be able to go into debt that way by dev soft you odn’t completely understand, you’re wise to make that software reflect your understanding as best you can. So that when it does come tiem to refactor it’s clear what your thinking was when you wrote it. and making it easier to refactor it to what your thinking is now.

in other words the whole debt metaphor or lets say the ability to pay back debt, and make the debt metaphor work for your advantage depends upon you writing code that is clean enough to be able to refactor as you come to understand your problem.

i think that’s a good methodology it’s at the heart of extreme programming. the debt metaphor is an explanation, one of many explanations as to why extreme programming works.

Read our popular interview guides for candidates, managers & recruiters: MySQL DBAAWS Expert (Amazon Cloud) and Cloud Deployment & Automation Engineer.

Don’t forget, hiring is a numbers game

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AirBNB didn't have to fail

Today part of Amazon Web Services failed, taking down with it a slew of startups that all run on Amazon’s Cloud infrastructure. AirBNB was one of the biggest, but also Heroku, Reddit, Minecraft, Flipboard & Coursera down with it. Its not the first time. What the heck happened, and why should we care?

1. Root Cause

The AWS service allows companies like AirBNB to build web applications, and host them on servers owned and managed by Amazon. The so-called raw iron of this army of compute power sits in datacenters. Each datacenter is a zone, and there are many in each of their service regions including US East (Northern Virginia), US West (Oregon), US West (Northern California), EU (Ireland), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Tokyo), South America (Sao Paulo), and AWS GovCloud.

Today one of those datacenters in the Northern Virginia region had a failure. What does this mean? Essentially firms like AirBNB that hosted their applications ONLY in Northern Virginia experienced outages.

As it turns out, Amazon has a service level agreement of 99.95% availability. We’ve long since said goodbye to the five nines. HA is overrated.

2. Use Redundancy

Although there are lots of pieces and components to a web infrastructure, two big ones are webservers and database servers. Turns out AirBNB could make both of these tiers redundant. How do we do it?

On the database side, you can use Amazon’s multi-az or alternately read-replicas. Each have different service characteristics so you’ll have to evaluate your application to figure out what will work for you.

Then there is the option to host mysql or Percona directly on Amazon servers yourself and use replication.

[quote]Using redundant components like placing webservers and databases in multiple regions, AirBNB could avoid an Amazon outage like Monday’s that affected only Northern Virginia.[/quote]
When do I want RDS versus mysql? Here are some use cases for RDS versus roll your own MySQL.

Now that you’re using multiple zones and regions for your database the hard work is completed. Webservers can be hosted in different regions easily, and don’t require complicated replication to do it.

3. Have a browsing only mode

Another step AirBNB can take to be resilient is to build a browsing only mode into their application. Often we hear about this option for performing maintenance without downtime. But it’s even more valuable during a situation like this. In a real outage you don’t have control over how long it lasts or WHEN it happens. So a browsing only mode can provide real insurance.

For a site like AirBNB this would mean the entire website was up and operating. Customers could browse and view listings, only when they went to book a room would the encounter an error. This would be a very small segment of their customers, and a much less painful PR problem.

Facebook has experience intermittent outages of it’s service. People hardly notice because they’ll often only see a message when they are trying to comment on someone’s wall post, send a message or upload a photo. The site is still operating, but not allowing changes. That’s what a browsing only mode affords you.

[quote]A browsing only mode can make a big difference, keeping most of the site up even when transactions or publish are blocked.
[/quote]

Drupal, an open source CMS system that powers sites like Adweek.com, TheHollywoodReporter.com, and Economist.com uses this technology. It supports a browsing only mode out of the box. An amazon outage like this one would only stop editors from publishing new stories temporarily. A huge win to sites that get 50 to 100 million with-an-m pageviews per month.

4. Web Applications need Feature Flags

Feature flags give you an on/off switch. Build them into heavy duty parts of your site, and you can disable those in an emergency. Host components multiple availability zones for extra peace of mind.

One of our all time most popular posts 5 Things Toxic to Scalability included some indepth discussion of feature flags.

5. Consider Netflix’s Simian Army

Netflix takes a very progressive approach to availability. They bake redundancy and automation right into all of their infrastructure. Then they run an app called the Chaos Monkey which essentially causes outages, randomly. If resilience from constantly falling and getting back up can’t make you stronger, I don’t know what can!

Take a look at the Netflix blog for details on intentional load & stress testing.

6. Use multiple cloud providers

If all of the above isn’t enough for you, taking it further you’d do as George Reese of enstratus recommends and use multiple cloud providers. Not being beholden to one company could help in more situations than just these type of service disruptions too.

Basic EC2 Best Practices mean building redundancy into your infrastructure. Multiple cloud providers simply take that one step further.

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31 Essential Blogs for Startups & Scalability

So many blogs, so little time! Here’s our list of the best we’ve found. Currently our favorite reader is Pulse pictured left. Starting to play around with flipboard too.

Nuts & Bolts Technical

Slashdot
One of the original tech blogs, that still covers lots of breaking news, and difficult topics. Very technical, with probing commentary. Beware the actual comments though, as they’re often full of immature and childish rants.

Planet Mysql
An aggregator of many MySQL blogs, it hits on topics from benchmarking, and advanced tuning, to new technologies on the horizon. Drupal and LAMP topics are often also covered.

mysql performance blog
Percona’s technical blog never disappoints. There are endless posts about a myriad of topics related to deploying, tuning and optimizing MySQL and all it’s variants.

Hacker News
You may not like Paul Graham, he’s easy not to. But his YCombinator News site is an awesome collection of always surprising technical topics that are sure to keep you busy.

Netflix Tech Blog
You might have read about Chaos Monkey before, that

Our very own Scalable Startups
You’re already reading us regularly of course! Why not grab our newsletter?

Programmable Web
Mashups & APIs. What more do you want? Very cool stuff here.

Also take a look at our best of compilation.

Business & Economics

HBR Blog
If you’ve ever read Harvard Business Review, you know how in depth and on point the material is. More thorough discussions than many other blogs, and excellent discussions in the comments.

Marginal Revolution
Tyler Cowen’s endlessly interesting and provocative take on the world through the eyes of economics. Like using science to analyze and solve the worlds ails, this blog always has a reasoned take on things.

NPR Planet Money
I’ve been listening to this podcast religiously since the financial crisis of 2008. It continues to intrigue and educate me in ways that college finance never did. You’ll learn a lot.

Bloomberg Businessweek
BBW despite it’s name is like Wired back in the 90’s before it got taken over by Conde, and the cutting edge writers and risk takers left. That’s right this magazine is full of analysis, creativity, and color. It’s what you’re looking for in a print magazine. One of my favorites.

Inc. Magazine
Real articles for your small business needs today. Thoughtful and topical.

Forbes Magazine
Banking, finance, politics, news.

You might also check out our Scalable Startups newsletter archives.

Venture

A VC
Fred Wilson’s iconic blog is always on the cusp, with a thoughtful and participating audience of readers.

Infochachkie
John Greathouse is a VC with a very readable blog on startups and investing.

Chris Dixon
This guy invested in tons of great startups that are household names now. With a very readable blog to match, he’s a man with ideas that we all benefit from.

Springwise
As they call it, your “Essential Fix of Entrepreneurial Ideas”.

Feld Thoughts
Brad Feld is another big VC with an excellent blog on topics relevant to Venture Capital & Startups.

Social

Andrew Chen
Consumer internet, metrics, and user growth. Brilliant idea guy. I learn from this guy’s blog everytime I check it.

Problogger
The smarties behind the book of the same name, this is essential reading for bloggers who wanna make a dent in the world.

Blog Tyrant
How to build successful blogs that make real money. Learn from Ramsay Taplin who’s done it already. Whether your blog sells products, widgets or services, there’s stuff for you here.

Kissmetrics Marketing Blog
Very good stuff on marketing, twitter, facebook and all the other good social topics.

Mixergy Blog
Business tips & startup advice with a bent towards marketing and social.

Mark Schaefer Marketing
Mark’s the brains behind the great book Return on Influence which we reviewed. His Businesses Grow blog is full of helpful ideas and insights.

Figaro Speech
You may have read my review of Word Hero and seen the earlier review of Thank You For Arguing. His blog is a real gem, extending on the wonders and lessons of word hero, you’ll be writing witty and memorable one-liners and titles that will go viral tomorrow!

Industry

Gigaom
Om Malik started out writing about the bandwidth boom and bust of the 2000’s. His blog has grown wildly to cover the industry as a whole, and contrary to the stuff you get on business insider, this is quality journalism.

AllThingsD
Another industry site with a great selection of journalists writing on the internet & startup industries.

ReadWriteWeb
Another excellent industry blog with slightly overlapping coverage to gigaom and allthingsd, but worth scanning each of them for different perspectives.

Venturebeat
Possibly a bit more venture and investment oriented than the others, but still mainly an industry coverage blog site.

Entrepreneur
Slightly more focus on business, and entrepreneurs, but also internet & startup industry topics.

Adweek
Trying to broaden my horizons by adding this one into the mix. Some very interesting topics, and plenty of overlap with internet industry and startups.

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