Tag Archives: puppet

5 tech challenges I’m thinking about today

fast fish

Technical operations & startup tech are experiencing an incredible upheaval which is bringing a lot of great things.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Here are some of the questions it raises for me.

1. Are we adopting Docker without enough consideration?

Container deployments are accelerating at a blistering pace. I was reading Julian Dunn recently, and he had an interesting critical post Are container deployments like an oncoming train?

He argues that we should be wary of a few trends. One of taking legacy applications and blindly containerizing them. Now we can keep them alive forever. :) He also argues that there is a tendency for folks who aren’t particularly technical or qualified who start evangelizing it everywhere. A balm for every ailment!

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. Is Redshift supplanting hadoop & spark for startup analytics?

In a recent blog post I asked Is Redshift outpacing hadoop as the big data warehouse for startups.

On the one hand this is exciting. Speed & agile is always good right? But what of more Amazon & vendor lock-in?

Related: Did Dropbox have to fail?

3. Does devops automation make all of operations a software development exercise?

I asked this question a while back on my blog. Is automation killing old-school operations?

Automation suites like Chef & Puppet are very valuable, in enabling the administration of fleets of servers in the cloud. They’re essential. But there’s some risk in moving further away from the bare metal, that we might weaken our everyday tuning & troubleshooting skills that are essential to technical operations.

Read: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport?

4. Is the cloud encouraging the old pattern of throwing hardware at the problem?

Want to scale your application? Forget tighter code. Don’t worry about tuning SQL queries that could be made 1000x faster. We’re in the cloud. Just scale out!

That’s right with virtualization, we can elastically scale anything. Infinitely. :)

I’ve argued that throwing hardware at the problem is like kicking the can down the road. Eventually you have to pay your technical debt & tune your application.

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Is Amazon disrupting venture capital itself?

I’m not expert on the VC business. But Ben Thompson & James Allworth surely are. And they suggested that because of AWS, startups can setup their software for pennies.

This resonates loud & clear for me. Why? Because in the 90’s I remember startups needing major venture money to buy Sun hardware & Oracle licenses to get going. A half million easy.

They asked Is Amazon Web Services enabling AngelList syndicates to disrupt the Venture capital business? That’s a pretty interesting perspective. It would be ironic if all of this disruption that VC’s bring to entrenched businesses, began unravel their own business!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is automation killing old-school operations?

puppet logo

Join 27,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I was shocked to find this article on ReadWrite: The Truth About DevOps: IT Isn’t Dead; It’s not even Dying. Wait a second, do people really think this?

Truth is I have heard whispers of this before. I was at a meetup recently where the speaker claimed “With more automation you can eliminate ops. You can then spend more on devs”. To an audience of mostly developers & startup founders, I can imagine the appeal.

1. Does less ops mean more devs?

If you’re listening to a platform service sales person or a developer who needs more resources to get his or her job done, no one would be surprised to hear this. If we can automate away managing the stack, we’ll be able to clear the way for the real work that needs to be done!

This is a very seductive perspective. But it may be akin to taking on technical debt, ignoring the complexity of operations and the perspective that can inform a longer view.

chef logo

Puppet Labs’ Luke Kanies says “Become uniquely valuable. Become great at something the market finds useful.”. I couldn’t agree more.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

2. What happens when developers leave?

I would argue that ops have a longer view of product lifecycle. I for one have been brought in to many projects after the first round of developers have left, and teams are trying to support that software five years after the first version was built.

That sort of long term view, of how to refresh performance, and revitalize code is a unique one. It isn’t the “building the future” mindset, the sexy products, and disruptive first mover “we’re changing the world” mentality.

It’s a more stodgy & conservative one. The mindset is of reliability, simplicity, and long term support.

Also: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck

3. What’s your mandate?

From what I’ve seen, devs & ops are divided by a four letter word.

That word I believe is “risk”. Devs have a mandate from the business to build features & directly answer to customer requests today. Ops have a mandate to reliability, working against change and thinking in terms of making all that change manageable.

Different mandates mean different perspectives.

Related: What is Devops & why is it important?

4. Can infrastructure live as code?

Puppet along with infrastructure automation & configuration management tools like Chef offer the promise of fully automated infrastructure. But the truth is much much more complex. As typical technology stacks expand from load balancer, webserver & database, to multiple databases, caching server, search server, puppet masters, package repositories, monitoring & metrics collection & jump boxes we’re all reaching a saturation point.

Yes automation helps with that saturation, but ultimately you need people with those wide ranging skills, to manage the complex web of dependencies when things fail.

And fail they will.

Check out: Why are MySQL DBA’s and ops so hard to find?

5. ORM’s and architecture

If you aren’t familiar, ORM’s are a rather dry sounding name for a component that is regularly overlooked. It’s a middleware sitting between application & database, and they drastically simplify developers lives. It helps them write better code and get on with the work of delivering to the business. It’s no wonder they are popular.

But as Ward Cunningham elloquently explains, they are surely technical debt that eventually must get paid. Indeed.

There is broad agreement among professional DBA’s. Each query should be written, each one tuned, and each one deployed. Just like any other bit of code. Handing that process to a library is doomed to failure. Yet ORM’s are still evolving, and the dream still lives on.

And all that because devs & ops have a completely different perspective. We need both of them to run modern internet applications. Lets not forget folks. :)

Read this: Do managers and CTO’s underestimate operational costs?

Want more? Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Which tech do startups use most?

MySQL on Amazon Cloud AWS

Leo Polovets of Susa Ventures publishes an excellent blog called Coding VC. There you can find some excellent posts, such as pitches by analogy, and an algorithm for seed round valuations and analyzing product hunt data.

He recently wrote a blog post about a topic near and dear to my heart, Which Technologies do Startups Use. It’s worth a look.

One thing to keep in mind looking over the data, is that these are AngelList startups. So that’s not a cross section of all startups, nor does it cover more mature companies either.

In my experience startups can get it right by starting fresh, evaluating the spectrum of new technologies out there, balancing sheer solution power with a bit of prudence and long term thinking.

I like to ask these questions:

o Which technologies are fast & high performance?
o Which technologies have a big, vibrant & robust community?
o Which technologies can I find plenty of engineers to support?
o Which technologies have low operational overhead?
o Which technologies have low development overhead?

1. Database: MySQL

MySQL holds a slight lead according to the AngelList data. In my experience its not overly complex to setup and there are some experienced DBAs out there. That said database expertise can still be hard to find .

We hear a lot about MongoDB these days, and it is surely growing in popularity. Although it doesn’t support joins and arbitrary slicing and dicing of data, it is a very powerful database engine. If your application needs more straightforward data access, it can bring you amazing speed improvements.

Postgres is a close third. It’s a very sophisticated database engine. Although it may have a smaller community than MySQL, overall it’s a more full featured database. I’d have no reservations recommending it.

Also: Top MySQL DBA Interview questions

2. Hosting: Amazon

Amazon Web Services is obviously the giant in the room. They’re big, they’re cheap, they’re nimble. You have a lot of options for server types, they’ve fixed many of the problems around disk I/O and so forth. Although you may still experience latency around multi-tenant related problems, you’ll benefit from a truly global reach, and huge cost savings from the volume of customers they support.

Heroku is included although they’re a different type of service. In some sense their offering is one part operations team & one part automation. Yes ultimately you are getting hosting & virtualization, but some things are tied down. Amazon RDS provides some parallels here. I wrote Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?. Long term you’re likely going to switch to an AWS, Joyent or Rackspace for real scale.

I was surprised to see Azure on the list at all here, as I rarely see startups build on microsoft technologies. It may work for the desktop & office, but it’s not the right choice for the datacenter.

Read: Are generalists better at scaling the web?

3. Languages: Javascript

Javascript & Node.js are clearly very popular. They are also highly scalable.

In my experience I see a lot of PHP & of course Ruby too. Java although there is a lot out there, can tend to be a bear as a web dev language, and provide some additional complication, weight and overhead.

Related: Is Hunter Walk right about operations & startups?

4. Search: Elastic Search

I like that they broke apart search technology as a separate category. It is a key component of most web applications, and I do see a lot of Elastic Search & Solr.

That said I think this may be a bit skewed. I think by far the number one solution would be NO SPECIFIC SEARCH technology. That’s right, many times devs choose a database centric approach, like FULLTEXT or others that perform painfully bad.

If this is you, consider these search solutions. They will bring you huge performance gains.

Check this: Are SQL Databases Dead?

5. Automation: Chef

As with search above, I’d argue there is a far more prevalent trend, that is #1 to use none of these automation technologies.

Although I do think chef, docker & puppet can bring you real benefits, it’s a matter of having them in the right hands. Do you have an operations team that is comfortable with using them? When they leave in a years time, will your new devops also know the technology you’re using? Can you find a good balance between automation & manual configuration, and document accordingly?

Read: Why are database & operations experts so hard to find?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

In search of a good book on Chef itself, I picked up this new title on O’Reilly.  It’s one of their new format books, small in size, only 75 pages.

There was some very good material in this book.  Mr. Nelson-Smith’s writing style is good, readable, and informative.  The discussion of risks of infrastructure as code was instructive.  With the advent of APIs to build out virtual data centers, the idea of automating every aspect of systems administration, and building infrastructure itself as code is a new one.  So an honest discussion of the risks of such an approach is bold and much needed.  I also liked the introduction to Chef itself, and the discussion of installation.

Chef isn’t really the main focus of this book, unfortunately.  The book spends a lot of time introducing us to Agile Development, and specifically test driven development.  While these are lofty goals, and the first time I’ve seen treatment of the topic in relation to provisioning cloud infrastructure, I did feel too much time was spent on that.  Continue reading Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

Configuration Management – What is it and why is it important?

Every software service or component on a server requires configurations. In your desktop applications you set preferences for what your default page will be, how you’d like your margins set, or whether to save and restore cookies each time you restart.

Enterprise applications also require complex configuration settings.  Want to monitor a webserver and a database with Nagios, that’s set in the config file.  What to start MySQL with 8G of memory for InnoDB, that’s also set in a config file.  What’s more config files contain server specific settings, based on IP address, or the servers role, webserver or database for example.   The webserver may also have memcache and outbound email services running.

With more traditional deployments, the systems administrator will setup each physical box, and configure those services based on the business needs.  As you bring online 10’s or 100’s of servers, however, you can quickly see how labor intensive this process would be, and also how much redundancy there is.

Enter configuration management into the picture.  Previously I blogged about tools like Puppet that can bring great new best practices to the table. There is also cfengine, and the newer Chef which incorporates cloud deployments as well into the mix.  Configuration management allows you to remotely administer servers, install packages, manage dependencies, install configurations based on a central copy, and even define roles and templates for new servers.  This brings a whole new level of professionalism to deployments, and also newfound power and flexibility.

We’ll be writing more about configuration management, especially in the context of cloud deployments such as Amazon EC2 so please stay tuned.

Sean Hull asks on Quora – What is configuration management and why is it important?