Tag Archives: opensource

Are open source projects run like a democracy or an oligarchy?

aristocracy

I was reading Fred Wilson’s comments recently on The Bitcoin XT Fork. In it he discussed how open source developers manage their projects.

“A group of open source core developers are a democratic system.”

I was surprised by this comment because I had never thought if it as democratic. Here are my thoughts…

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1. Indefinite tenure

Open source projects typically have a leader with indefinite tenure. He can’t be voted out. When developers are unhappy with how things are run, or how they’re evolving, they typically “fork” the project and go their own way.

That would be where Texas secedes from the union if they’re not happy with how things are run in Washington.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

2. Inherited rights

Like an aristocracy, leaders of an open source project typically have rights inherited. This could be due to merit, or seniority. They are the ones with admin rights on the git account.

Divine rights indeed!

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Appointments made by merit

Developers join open source projects, and move through the ranks mostly by merit. Sure there’s some back scratching, and massaging that helps too. Personality surely matters, but primarily skill at contributing code & architecture ideas are paramount.

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Power rests with a small elite

For sure, all people cannot vote on open source project direction. It’s a small group of elite, who are admittedly closest to it, and most knowledgable. These are the ones who control it’s direction.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

5. Oligarchy or Aristocracy?

From wikipedia an Oligarchy is “a form of power structure in which power effectively rests with a small number of people”. That sounds closest.

While open source projects do have the indefinite political tenure of an authoritarian regime, they lack the strict obedience aspect.

However, open source projects do look a bit like an Aristocracy. Aristocracy is “a form of government that places power in the hands of a small, privilged ruling class. The term derives from the Greek aristokratia meaning ‘rule of the best’. ”

Also: Are SQL Databases dead?

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Oracle to MySQL – prepare to bushwhack through the open source jungle

oracle to mysql

I was recently approached by a healthcare company for advice on suitable database solutions capable of executing its new initiative. The company was primarily an Oracle shop so naturally, they began by shopping for possible Oracle solutions.

The CTO relayed his conversation with the Oracle sales rep, who at first recommended an Oracle solution that, expensive as it may have been, ultimately aligned with the company’s existing technology and experience. Unfortunately this didn’t match their budget and so predictably, the Oracle sales rep whipped out a MySQL-based solution as an alternative.

Having worked as an Oracle DBA throughout the dot-com years, I know the technology well. I also know the cultural differences between enterprises that choose Oracle solutions and those that choose open-source ones.

This encounter with the healthcare firm struck me as a classic conundrum for today’s companies who are under pressure to meet business targets under a tight budget, and in a very short time.

Can an open-source solution like MySQL be the answer to such huge demands?

The Oracle sales rep will likely nod excitedly and say no sweat. But as a consultant I could only manage an equivocal yes.

As the healthcare CTO rattled off the list of products he wanted to use, specific RTOs and RPOs (recovery time objective + recovery point objective – all I could think was to react with concern.

In my experience with startup after startup I’ve seen plenty of different MySQL installations but I’d never heard of one with the technology stack he described. What’s more I’d never heard of these solutions described with the Oracle Corp titles.

On one hand I wanted to discuss the merits of the solution he was keen to implement, while on the other, I was expressing concern over possible directions and paths we might take.

An Oracle cluster is not a MySQL cluster

The solution Oracle suggested was a MySQL Cluster. The term cluster unfortunately means different things to different people. Such loose usage of the word dilutes its meaning. In particular a lot of Oracle technologists expect that this solution might be similar to Oracle’s Real Application Cluster technology. It’s not. There are a lot of limitations, and frankly it’s really just a different beast.

The list also included various management dashboards which Oracle likes to push, but which I rarely see in my consulting assignments. What’s more I heard nothing about replication integrity considering that replication problems are an ongoing concern for real-world MySQL installations due to the particular technology used under the hood. There are reliable solutions to this problem but none yet available from Oracle. In fact, this is a big problem but one that may be completely off the sales guys’ radar.

Don’t let sales frame your architecture

Honestly, I don’t have a particularly large axe to grind with the sales guys. They have a job to do, and providing solutions which bring revenue to their firm and commissions for themselves is what puts food on their tables. Each party is motivated in different ways. But as a company shopping for solutions, this should be kept clearly in mind when starting down that road.

Beware prescribed architectural frameworks that appear too easy because they almost always don’t do what they say on the tin. Unfortunately sales folks don’t have experiencing designing architectures in the real world, so they can’t really know how the technologies work beyond the data sheet with feature bullet points.

As we all know in the technology space, all software come with bugs and real-world experience does not match the feature lists in the brochures. In law they have de jure and de facto. The former describes what is written and the latter, what’s practiced. For technology solutions, its never just adding water for something to work.

Do your homework

Before you embark on a new trip through the open source technology jungle, do some due diligence. Read up on real-world solutions, and how other large firms are using the technology. What configurations are they having success with? Which are causing trouble for a lot of people.

One of the great advantages of open-source are the very vibrant communities, forums and discussion groups where people are glad to share their experiences and offer advice.

Allow sufficient time to test and
bring your team up to speed

This is very important one. Shifting from an enterprise that relies primarily on Oracle for it’s relational database solution over to one that relies on open source technologies is a very big step indeed. Open-source technologies tend to be much more do-it-yourself and roll your own. Oracle solutions tend much more toward predefined paths and solutions and prescriptions for customers.

There are merits to each of these paths, with attendant pros and cons. But they are decidedly different. It’s likely that your team will also require time to get up to speed, not just with the particular software components, but with the new process by which things happen in the open-source space. Allow sufficient time for this shift to take place, lest you create more problems than solutions.

Open Source – What is it and why is it important?

Open Source, a term understood well by the technology set, but not enough by everyone.

Open Source for the software industry is like generic drugs for the pharmaceutical industry.  It enables more players to come to the table, it is a huge driving force behind internet infrastructures, which are built on Linux, Apache and many other technologies.  It is the backbone of companies like google, and facilitates cloud services from the likes of Amazon EC2, Joyent, Rackspace and many others.

It is the rising tide that lifts all boats, if you will.

Sean Hull’s writing on Quora.