Tag Archives: lean

Is a dangerous anti-ops movement gaining momentum?

devops divide

I was talking with a colleague recently. He asked me …

What do you think of the #no-ops movement that seems to be gaining ground? How is it related to devops?

It’s an interesting question. With technologies like lambda & docker containers, the role & responsibilities & challenges of operations are definitely changing quickly.

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The tooling & automation stacks that are available now are great.  Groundbreaking. Paradigm shifting.  But there’s another devops story that’s buried there waiting to be heard…

1. What is ops anyway?

What exactly is operations anyway? Charity Majors wrote an amazing piece – WTF is operations which I highly recommend reading.

At root, operations is about providing a safe nest where software can live. From incubation, to birth, then care & feeding to maturity.

Also: Why Reddit CTO Martin Weiner wants a boring tech stack

2. Is Noops possible?

The trend to a #NOops movement I think is a dangerous one.

At first glance this might seem reflexive on my part.  After all I’ve specialized in operations & databases for years.  But I think there’s something more insidious here.

Devs are often presiding over the first wave of software. That’s the initial period of perhaps five years, where frenetic product development is happening.  After those years have passed, early innovators are long gone, and an OPS team is trying to keep things running, and patch where necessary.  This is when more conservative thinking, and the perspective of fewer moving parts & a simpler infrastructure seems so obvious.  All the technical debt is piled up & it’s hard to find the front door.

There’s an interesting article The ops identity crisis by Susan Fowler that I’d recommend for further reading.

Related: Is zero downtime even possible on RDS?

3. The dev mandate

I’ve sat in on teams talking about getting rid of ops & how it’ll mean more money to spend on devs etc.  It’s always a surprising sentiment to hear.

I would argue that developers have a mandate to build production & functionality that can directly help customers. This is in essence a mandate for change. Faster, more agile & responsive means quicker to market & more responsive to changes there.

Read: Five reasons to move data to Amazon Redshift

4. The ops mandate

I’ve also heard the other camp, ops talking about how stupid & short sighted devs can be. Deploying the lastest shiny toys, without operational or long term considerations being thought of.

The ops mandate then is for this longer term view. How can we keep systems stable at 2am in the morning? How can we keep them chugging along after five or more years?

This great article Happiness is a boring stack by Jason Kester really sums up the sentiment. The sure & steady, standard & reliable stack wins the operations test every time.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

5. Coming together

Ultimately dev & ops have different mandates.  One for change & new product features, the other against change, for long term stability.  It’s about striking a balance between the two.

It’s always a dance. That’s why dev & ops need to come together. That’s really what devops is all about.

For some further reading, I found Julia Evans’ piece What Is Devops to be an excellent read.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

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5 things I learned from Gif Constable about Talking to Humans

talking to humans

I was just scanning through AVC.com, Fred Wilson’s popular blog, and hit on a post about great reading material. In it was mentioned a free e-book by Gif Constable called Talking to Humans.

Gif developed the Lean Launchpad curriculum, taught at Stanford, UC Berkeley, Columbia, UCSF, NYU & now hundreds of other universities worldwide.

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One of the main takeaways from that work is the idea of “getting out of the building”. It means essentially that before you get to far along with your idea, building your product, and too heavily vested and invested in one direction, go do real research with real potential customers.

Right from the beginning test your ideas, and talk to customers. It’s not easy, but if done right will be very revealing.

The book can be had for free at Talking To Humans as an e-book, or send it straight to your kindle for $0.99 cents! With a forward by Steve Blank & Tom Fishburne’s funny cartoons and at only 98 pages, it’s well worth an hour or two of your time.

More details on Gif’s blog.

1. How to be a detective

Getting out of the building and talking to people is hard. It’s messy. It’s going into the real world where customers may not understand or care about your product.

But that’s also exactly why you want to talk to people. You’ll get real raw perspectives.

Also be wary of talking to friends & family. They may have biases, and want to tell you what you want to hear.

While interviewing, beware of speculation in your own ideas and what your interview subjects are telling you. Ask for stories instead and tease out real behavior.

Read this: When clients don’t pay

2. Fight cognitive biases with metrics

We all have biases. We think are customers are soccer moms, or 20-somethings who like lattes. By calculating metrics, we find out which market segments actually want our product and why. Keep calculating metrics, and make conclusions from real data.

At the same time beware the dynamic of mistaking statistics for facts. Remain skeptical!

Check out: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

GIFF CONSTABLE 03-SD from The GovLab on Vimeo.

3. Map out your business

There are a few models mentioned in the book for mapping your business. Choose your favorite:

Alexander Osterwalder’s business model canvas

Ash Maurya’s lean canvas

Also: Are SQL Databases Dead?

4. How a startup can fail

Startups can fail in a myriad of different ways. This business is not for the weary or faint of heart! Here are some of the land mines in the road ahead.

o wrong customer or market
o wrong revenue model
o wrong cost structure
o wrong customer acquisition
o wrong product
o wrong team
o wrong timing

Related: Will Oracle kill MySQL?

5. How to screw up customer discovery

Interviewing real customers in the field requires a lot of balance. Here are a few things you should avoid:

o let speculation equal confirmation
o lead the witness to your conclusion
o talk over them
o selective hearing
o weigh one conversation heavily
o let fear of rejection win
o talking to anyone
o be unprepared for the interview
o try to learn everything at once
o only do customer dev first week
o ask customer to design the product

See also: How can Vagrant be used to deploy on Amazon EC2

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5 Things Frans Johansson says about innovation

medici affect johansson

You may not have heard of Medici before, but you’ve probably heard of the renaissance. The medici family hosted the round tables, the meetups, the social gatherings & mixers. They brought diverse artisans engineers & thinkers together, and the world hasn’t been the same since!

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In the Medici Effect, Frans dissects what this famous family did. His case studies include the likes of Richard Branson, Deepak Chopra, Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, Orit Gadiesh, Marcus Samuelsson, George Soros & our own favorite Linus Torvalds,

What he discovered really surprised me.

1. Swim at the intersection

Hanging out with folks in your field is great. Whether you’re a physician, financial analyst, Ruby programmer, or artist. But it won’t expose us to enough new ideas. To get that, you need to hang out with those in other disciplines. Learn a language, take dance classes, try your hand at a new sport, or attend meetups of wedding planners or DJs. Whatever it takes to get out of your comfort zone is what will put you at the intersection.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

2. You need quantity to get quality

This was a very surprising finding of their research. One might think that greats like Albert Einstein were geniuses from the start. But it turns out one consistent factor between all these folks is the quantity of their attempts. They came up with many many ideas, and chased as many as they could. Of course they are only remembered for their successes, but this hides the underlying mathematics. It’s a numbers game in almost all of these cases.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

3. Peel all the potatoes and cook them together

Peel one potato and cook it. Then peel another and cook it. Doesn’t sound like a recipe for efficiently preparing dinner does it? Turns out it’s also not great for innovating. Peel & prepare many ideas at once, and try to execute them in parallel if you can. That’s what these greats have done.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

4. Be ok with more failures

This is a tricky one. But Johansson puts in perspective with this key quote:

”Inaction is far worse than failure.”

Viewed that way, our caution about diving into a new idea seems more limiting. True it costs money, time & resources to pursue new ideas, ventures & startups. So be sure to reserve resources. That’s right spend that money & time carefully lest you run out before hitting on the big one.

He also says to be suspicious of low failure rates. In yourself or those you’re evaluating. This probably indicates you’re not risking enough, or trying new things constantly.

Read this: Why Oracle Won’t Kill MySQL

5. break out of your network

Your network is powerful to pursue your career, or following existing well traveled paths. But they can be an obstacle when forging new paths, which is what innovation is all about.

So break away from your networks. One way you can do this is by building a new one. But be sure to surround yourself with diverse cultures, upbringing, backgrounds & expertise.

Also: RDS or MySQL 10 Use Cases

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25 Rumsfelds Rules for Startups

RumsfeldsRules

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While we are still deep in the woods of a government shutdown, I thought it would be interesting to sum up some of our former Defense Secretary’s words of wisdom.

Rumsfeld may not have done everything right, but some of his quotes are priceless. What’s more they appeal to Startups quite nicely…

1 If you are working from your inbox, you are working on other people’s priorities.

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2 Men count up the faults of those who keep them waiting.

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3 In unanimity, there may well be either cowardice or uncritical thinking.

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4 Test ideas in the marketplace. You learn from hearing a range of perspectives.

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5. You can’t recover a fumble unless you’re on the field. Get out there.

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Read this: Why the Twitter IPO mentioned scalability

6. First law of holes. If you get in one, stop digging.

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7. Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.

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8. You pay the same price for doing something halfway as for doing it completely so you might as well do it completely.

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9. It is difficulties that show what men are.

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10. What you measure, improves.

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Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

11. If you are lost, “climb, conserve and confess”

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12. It is not the strongest species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

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13. Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

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14. People don’t spend money earned by others with the same care that they spend their own.

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15. Disagreement is not disloyalty.

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Related: Why a CTO must never do this

16. A lie travels halfway around the world before the truth gets its shoes on.

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17. It is easier to convince someone they’re right, than to convince them they’re wrong.

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18. Your best question is often why.

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19. Simply because a problem is shown to exist, it doesn’t necessarily follow that there is a solution.

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20. The world is run by those who show up.

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Read: Who is Sean Hull?

21. Don’t panic. Things may be going better than they seem from the inside.

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22. Know that the amount of criticism you receive may correlate closely to the amount of publicity you get.

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23. Sunshine is a weather report, a flood is news.

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24. If you expect people to be in on the landing, include them in the takeoff.

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25. If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.

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Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

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