Tag Archives: jobs

How do we measure devotion?

devoted_employee

I was talking recently over email with a hiring manager. Jamie (not his real name) wanted to hire me, but was set against consulting. While that by itself is understandable, he seemed to equate it with devotion. This troubled me. Here’s the quote below.

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While I am sure your skills are excellent, I guess what I am trying to gauge is your desire to quit consulting and join us full time.  I am looking for you to share my vision of changing publishing through data.   Let me be clear: I am not looking for a contractor.  Acme is a fabulous company and I need a person devoted to Acme and to our data assets.

1. Devotion on vacation

Here’s my response. All names have been changed.


I understand Jamie.

I hear you about devotion, I think it’s very important too.  In 2010, I was working at MGC.  After 3 months, they hired a large remote DBA firm out of Canada, to manage the database systems & my contract concluded.  

A few weeks later and a few hours before a plane flight,  I got a harried call.  Can you help us? Database replication is broken & our site is offline.   I jumped on skype to chat with the team, even as I was packing my bags.  I went to the airport, and got on WIFI again.  In-flight on my way to California I remained online to help repair the systems & bring everything back.  It took a few more days and half of my vacation to get things working again, but I wanted to help.

My boss at MGC kept me on for 1 ½ year after that.  He felt I was devoted & gave them the very best service.  

If you change your mind, or would like to discuss further, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Also: What happens when clients don’t pay?

2. Devotion to a manager

I had another experience years back with company Media Inc. Working under a very good CTO, I was surrounded by a team who was also very loyal to him. After about a year, he decided to leave. He had gotten a very enticing offer from another firm. Although he made a great effort to leave the ship in good condition, the crew felt the ship rocking a bit. A temporary CTO was brought on who had a very different style.

As the ship continued to rock at sea, finally a new CTO was found. He however was not popular at all. He had a swagger & tended to throw his weight around, irritating the team, and making them fear they might be thrown from the ship. Slowly they began to leave. After three months, six out of eight on the team had left. There was one old-school Oracle guy still left, and me.

Although he certainly had a different style than the previous boss, it didn’t bother me much. I told him I’d stay as long as he needed me. I was also working remote so I didn’t deal with some of the day-to-day politics.

My devotion was to the business, databases & systems. I accomplished this by being devoted to my own business.

Related: Why I ask customers for a deposit?

3. Devotion to vesting

I worked at another firm about three years ago. Let’s call them Growing Fast Inc. While the firm itself was gaining ground & getting customers like Nike & Wallmart, it still had an engineering team of only ten. You could say it was boxing way above it’s weight.

While it tried to grow, it hired an outside CTO to help. His style was primarily management facing, while the teams problems were based in technology. With tons of technical debt & a lack of real leadership, the engineering team was floundering. Lots of infighting was making things worse.

Suddenly a key team member decided to quit. The following week another, and after that two more. All told four left. When you consider how small the team was, and further that the remaining members were basically founders a different picture emerges. Four out of six (non-founders) had left in two weeks, roughly 66% of the engineering team. The only other guy who stayed had his visa sponsored by Growing Fast Inc.

The founders who stayed were all vested. Everyone else quit because of mismanagement.

Read: 5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

4. Devotion to code & data

In an industry as competitive as software & technology, it’s often devotion to building things that wins the day. Using the latest & greatest languages, databases & tech stack can carry a lot of weight.

Managing technical debt can make a difference too. Developers don’t want to be asked to constantly walk a minefield of other developers mistakes. A minefield needs to be cleaned up, for the business to flourish.

Also: 5 things I learned about trust & advising clients?

5. Devotion through & through

Running a startup isn’t easy. Many fail after 3 or 5 years. I’m devoted to business.  I’ve been an entrepreneur for 20 years, and built it into a success.  

The year after 9/11 & again after 2008 were the most difficult periods to tough it out.  It’s been hard fought & I wouldn’t shutter the doors of my own business easily.  It affords me the opportunity to attend AWS popup loft hearing lectures, going to conferences & meetups & blogging about technology topics, & pivoting with the technological winds change.  

I’ve found all of this makes me extremely valuable to firms looking for expertise.  I have independence & perspective that’s hard to find.  I’m also there for firms that have been looking to fill a role, and need help sooner rather than later.

Also: A CTO must never do this

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Are career promotions like marriage… appealing until your first divorce?

surge pricing engineers

I was recently flipping through an interesting email list. It’s focused for tech leaders, managers & startup entrepreneurs. An HR team lead posted asking about “promotion paths” for engineers.

While I have an intuitive grasp of what engineers at those different levels look like, I’m having trouble making those concrete.

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It struck me how antiquated the whole “career ladder” concept is. Work one job for 20-30 years. It feels like the fairytale of dating that leads safely to marriage. It all seems like a wonderful plan until it fizzles out, employees get jaded, they start seeing the real money being paid elsewhere, and begin looking around.

1. Talent in short supply

I’m not a CTO.  I should preface with that bit.  I’m a consultant.  That said I’ve worked in the tech industry for 20 years, so I have a bit of an opinion here.

Going to meetups, startup industry & pitch events. They’re all like a feeding frenzy. There are more companies hiring now than I remember back in 1998 & 1999. It’s just crazy.

Angel List says 18,000 companies are hiring right now. What about Made In NYC? That shows 735 jobs. And of course there’s Ycombinator who is hiring April 2016, which posts every other month. It has 720 comments as of this writing.

Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

2. Are salary jumps always larger through external promotion?

I’ve seen a pattern repeated over & over.  An outside firm offers more money & grabs the talent, or the talent gets restless, starts looking & finds they get a bigger bump in salary by leaving, than by internal promotions.  

I don’t know why this is, but it seems almost universal that salary jumps are larger from outside firms, than internally through promotion.  

Also: Why devops talent is so hard to find

3. Building a better ladder

There are great posts on engineering ladders like this one from Neo and also this one from RTR. Also take a look at this one at Artsy. And of course somebody has to go and put theirs up on github. :)

All the titles & internal shuffling in the world aren’t going to hide industry pay for long.  When an employee gets wise to their career & the skills marketplace, they’ll eventually learn that title does not equal compensation.

Related: How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck?

4. Building a better culture

In a pricey city like New York, the only thing that seems a counterweight to this is phenomenal culture, chance to build something cool & be surrounded by coworkers you love.  To be sure bouncing around you get less of this. Companies like Etsy comes to mind. According to glassdoor companies like Airbnb, Hubspot & facebook also fit the bill.

Read: 8 questions to ask an aws expert

5. Surge pricing for engineers?

Alternatively to better ladders & promotions, perhaps what Uber did for taxi driving would make sense for hiring engineers too. Let the freelancing phenomenon grow even bigger!

Perhaps we need surge pricing for engineers. That way the very best really do get rewarded the most. Let the marketplace work it’s magic.

Also: When you have to take the fall

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Locking down cloud systems from disgruntled engineers

medieval gate fortified aws

I worked at a customer last year, on a short term assignment. A brilliant engineer had built their infrastructure, automated deployments, and managed all the systems. Sadly despite all the sleepless nights, and dedication, they hadn’t managed to build up good report with management.

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I’ve seen this happen so many times, and I do find it a bit sad. Here’s an engineer who’s working his butt off, really wants the company to succeed. Really cares about the systems. But doesn’t connect well with people, often is dismissive, disrespectful or talks down to people like they’re stupid. All burns bridges, and there’s a lot of bad feelings between all parties.

How to manage the exit process. Here’s a battery of recommendations for changing credentials & logins so that systems can’t be accessed anymore.

1. Lock out API access

You can do this by removing the administrator role or any other role their IAM user might have. That way you keep the account around *just in case*. This will also prevent them from doing anything on the console, but you can see if they attempt any logins.

Also: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

2. Lock out of servers

They may have the private keys for various serves in your environment. So to lock them out, scan through all the security groups, and make sure their whitelisted IPs are gone.

Are you using a bastion box for access? That’s ideal because then you only have one accesspoint. Eliminate their login and audit access there. Then you’ve covered your bases.

Related: Does Amazon eat it’s own dogfood?

3. Update deployment keys

At one of my customers the outgoing op had setup many moving parts & automated & orchestrated all the deployment processes beautifully. However he also used his personal github key inside jenkins. So when it went to deploy, it used those credentials to get the code from github. Oops.

We ended up creating a company github account, then updating jenkins with those credentials. There were of course other places in the capistrano bits that also needed to be reviewed.

Read: Is aws a patient that needs constant medication?

4. Dashboard logins

Monitoring with NewRelic or Nagios? Perhaps you have a centralized dashboard for your internal apps? Or you’re using Slack?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

5. Non-key based logins

Have some servers outside of AWS in a traditional datacenter? Or even servers in AWS that are using usernames & passwords? Be sure to audit the full list of systems, and change passwords or disable accounts for the outgoing sysop.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport?

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5 data points I track for reputation & career building

When I tell people I’ve been independent for two decades, they often look at me surprised. How do you do that? How do you keep business coming in?

recent linkedin views

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As a freelancer you surely have to be on top of changing trends, and where the wind is blowing. But whether you’re a CEO or CTO of a larger firm, or a developer, HR or marketing director, you can also benefit by actively tracking yourself. Career building never ends…

1. Real Leads

This is probably the hardest metric to track, but the most important. A lead is anyone who may potentially hire my services. These can come from Linkedin, newsletter subscribers, or via a Google search. I track how they reached me, and how warm the lead is.

I do also track when recruiters reach out, as I think this can serve as a useful barometer as well. Also as my blog has grown, I get a lot of SEO bloggers, fishing for sites they can post backlinks on. Although I rarely entertain them, it is a useful reflection of how popular your site is getting.

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

2. Newsletter signups

I think of the newsletter as an extension of my blog. I invite everyone I’ve ever touched in business. This includes coworkers, to colleagues at meetups & conferences. I invite recruiters & headhunters as well, because name recognition & reputation building is also important.

The newsletter is a way to show up in the inbox of everybody you’ve ever worked with. Month after month, year in and year out, you’re plodding away & doing your thing. It’s a reminder that you’re out there, and colleagues, CEOs & CTOs refer me all the time. It’s been very valuable over ten years.

newsletter signups

I also track email opens & email clicks. Those range around 25% and 10% respectively. I know when I’ve hit a topic that resonates & try to have that inform future content direction.

Related: The Myth of Five Nines

3. Linkedin Views

Linkedin is super valuable too. They provide a nice graph of how many times your profile was viewed weekly through to the last 90 days. This is super useful to find out if your resume & profile is keyword rich.

I like to actively tweak my profile, for the latest trending terminology. For example in the 90’s Unix Administrator or Systems Administrator was common, but nowadays everyone likes to say SRE. What’s that? Site Reliability Engineer. Yes it’s a buzzword, and as it turns out people use trending terms & buzzwords to search for people with your skills.

So get on it, and edit those terms!

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

4. Website Visitors

In a services business you don’t usually sell widgets on your website. However, I like to think of a web presense as my business card. So in that light, more visitors means more renown. That projects your personal brand, and builds it long term.

website visitors

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

5. Klout Score

Klout score is a rough measure of how active you are across social media. Twitter is a big one, but it also finds you on Linkedin & other platforms as well. Although the score is far from perfect, it does give you a sense of reputation & noteriety, which do ultimately translate to business.

Also: 5 Things Toxic To Scalability

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5 ways to level up as cloud expert

aws certified

Cloud computing is blowing up! But don’t take my word for it, read this recent NY Times piece: Tech companies clamor to entice cloud computing experts.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Still don’t believe me? Get on the phone with a recruiter or two. They’ll convince you because they’ve got companies banging down the door looking for talent that is plainly in SHORT SUPPLY. And that’s the supply *you* want to be. :)

Check Gary’s Guide Jobs, or the ever popular Angel List Jobs. There’s also Stack Overflow jobs and many more.

1. Become a book reviewer

You’ve already got a technical background, and want to hone those skills. Take a look at technical book reviewing.

Manning is putting out some excellent technical books these days. Apply here to be a reviewer.

Also take a look at Pragmatic Bookshelf. They are are looking for reviewers too.

In either case you can expect to spend time reading a book chapter by chapter, as it’s written, offer strategic or layout advice, feedback on presentation, comprehension, and edits.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

2. Join an Open Source project

There are millions. Flip through github to some that you’re interested in. Contribute a bug fix or comment, reach out to the project leaders.

Afraid to dive in? Join one of the forums or google discussion groups, and lurk for a while. Ask questions, offer a helping hand!

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

3. Self-paced labs

Online education is blowing up, and for good reason. They get the job done & for the right price!

One of my favorites for AWS Certification is the A Cloud Guru courses. These offer lecture style introduction to all levels of AWS from Sysops Administration, Developer & Solutions Architect to Devops, Lambda & CodeDeploy.

The courses are priced right, and geared directly towards Amazon’s certifications. That helps you focus on the right things.

Amazon also partners with qwiklabs to offer courses geared towards getting certified. There are specific ones for the associate & professional certification, and many others besides.

You’ll need to signup for AWS Activate first, before you can use these qwiklabs. They offer you 80 credits right out of the gate.

For the next two weeks many of the courses are free! One thing I really like is they include a free temporary aws login for the students. That way there’s no risk of deploying infrastructure, and accidentally getting a big bill at the end of the month.

The labs though are more like reading documentation versus a nice video course lecture. So you the student have to do a lot more to get through it.

Read: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

4. Coursera, Khanacademy & Udemy

There’s a free class on Coursera called Startup Engineering by Balaji Srinivasan & Vijay Pande. Some pretty amazon material & lectures in here, and if you’re determined, it’s 12 weeks that will get you going on the right foot!

KhanAcademy has a great many courses on computer programming. Awesome and free stuff here. One particularly interesting is their hour of code. For those hesitant, that’s an easy way to jump in!

There is also udemy, which offers some great material on cloud computing. Notice that the certification courses are the same ones from A-Cloud Guru!

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Interview tests

Apply to jobs. Even if you’re unsure if that is your dream job. Why? Because they often include a test to find out about your technical chops. Diving into these tests is a great way to push your own edge. You may do well, you may not. Learn where your weaknesses are.

I especially like the ones where you’re asked to login to a server, configure some things, write some code, and solve a real problem. Nothing beats a real-world example!

Also: Why dropbox didn’t have to fail?

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Why is everyone suddenly talking about Amazon Redshift?

par accel redshift

It seems like all I hear these days is Redshift, Redshift, Redshift!

I met up with a recruiter today. We talked about this & that. The usual. Then when he came to the topic of technology he said,

“yeah it seems as though suddenly everybody is looking for Redshift & Snowflake”

As I blogged about before, I don’t work with recruiters, I learn a lot from them.

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Luckily I got to cut my teeth on Redshift about a year ago. I was senior database engineer managing Amazon & MySQL RDS, and they wanted to build a data warehouse. Bingo!

Here’s the big takeaway from my discussion today. Recruiters have their fingers on the pulse!

1. We need an Amazon expert

Here’s what else I’m hearing everywhere. “We’re migrating to AWS, can you help?” Complexity & confusion around the new virtual networking, moving into the cloud, and tuning applications & components to get the same performance as before. All of these are real & present needs for firms.

Related: Is data your dirty little secret?

2. We need a Redshift expert

Amazon bought Par Accel, a bleedingly fast warehouse. It uses SQL. It looks like Postgres, and handles petabytes. You read that petabytes! It’s so good in fact that it seems a lot of folks are now dumping Hadoop.

Incredible as that sounds, Redshift is delivering *that* kind of speed on that kind of big data. Wow! What’s more you skip the whole Hadoop cycle of write, test, debug, schedule job, fix bugs, and stir. With SQL you bring back the iterative agile process!

Read: 5 cloud challenges I’m thinking about today

3. We need a Hadoop expert

Ok, for those enterprises who aren’t sold on Redshift yet, there is still a ton of Hadoop out there. And for good reason.

Apache Spark is also getting really big now too. It’s an easier to manage successor to Hadoop, based around much of the same concepts.

Also: 5 core pieces of the Amazon cloud puzzle to get your project off the ground

4. We need strong Python skills

Python is everywhere. Amazon’s command line interface is python based. You see it everywhere. If it’s not in your wheelhouse get it there!

Also: Why Dropbox didn’t have to fail

5. We need communicators

Another interesting thing the recruiter said

“I was surprised & a little shocked that you suggested we meet for coffee. Most developers are hard to get out to have a conversation with.”

Good communicators are as in-demand as ever! Being able to and happy to talk with people who aren’t deeply technical, and distill complex technical jargon into plain english. And do that with a smile too & enjoy it?

That’s special!

Also: Should we be muddying the waters? Use cases for MySQL & Mongodb

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Are top candidates evaluating your startup?

Editor & writer in friendly dialog

I work for a lot of startups. Many ask me for referrals. I play matchmaker when I can. But as the market continues to heat up, the demand for top talent is reaching a boiling point.

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1. It’s a sellers market

That means folks with technical skills across the spectrum are very indemand. How in demand? Check Angellist, Made In NY or Indeed.com. From SRE’s to full stack developers, devops & automation experts to DBAs. Java, Ruby, Python, PHP, node.js, and of course design skills too.

I was speaking with a recruiter just today, and heard the same refrain…

Top candidates are evaluating us just as we are evaluating you.

That means firms must go the extra mile to stand out, and draw in the best talent.

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

2. Open the glassdoor

That’s right, manage your social media presence. Sites like Glass Door provide forums where employees past & present can discuss the day-to-day work environment. This gives prospects a chance to peer behind the curtain.

Other social media can be avenues too, from Facebook to Twitter. Having someone on staff that monitors online reputation can be crucial.

Related: Are SQL Databases dead?

3. Host a tech blog & meetups

A lot of top firms have great tech blogs. Truth be told many are dormant as demands of the day trump these outward facing initiatives. But they also put a face on the technical side of working for a firm. What problems are they solving? How cutting edge is their team?

Meetups are also a limitless forum. Smart minds will be mixing, your company brand will be spreading. Hosting technical discussions brings your firm front & center in multiple ways. It also brings possible new hires to your living room.

Read: Is high availability a myth?

4. Show warmth & transparency

I know everybody loves to grill candidates at interviews. But interviewees should be schooled on politeness & how to give a pleasant interview.

I remember one interview where I faced off with four other engineers at a round table. As the discussion unfolded, each aimed shots in succession, almost rapid fire at me. It was not only intimidating, but frustrating. Needless to say it made me a stronger more resilient interviewer, but it’s not a great way to welcome great talent. Buyer beware!

Also: The chaos theory of cloud scalability

5. Show me the money

I know I know, for engineers it’s not all about the money. Or is it? Truth be told compensation is always something prospects will weigh. Equity is fine, for what it is. But it’s a promise into the future.

More senior talent who have been through a few startups or even dot-com 1.0, may be a bit more dubious of abstract compensation. In the end competitive real dollars will speak volumes.

Also: Is upgrading Amazon RDS like a shit-storm that will not end?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Best of hiring posts on scalable startups

strawberries

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Why I write about hiring

I’ve worked as a consultant for almost twenty years. Technology & professional services are pretty far removed from hiring, so why would I write about it?

As it turns out, finding projects, working with clients, and selling your skills & solutions has quite a lot in common to do with hiring.

As a services consultant, you’re more often a peer to technology directors & CTOs, while hiring for traditional roles is more of a boss employee relationship.

Recruiters

I’ve run into a lot of recruiters & hr folks over the years. Usually it means I’m talking to the wrong folks, as they’re gatekeepers & not decision makers. I wrote Why I don’t work with recruiters after some ups & downs.

Still they’re all a fact of life, and each of us has a role to play. So let’s play fair!

Games

I’ve always wondered, Is Hiring a numbers game? That is does it bend more to persistence & throwing spagetti at the wall, or deliberate, precision searches?

MySQL interview

If you’re looking for a database expert, I put together
Top MySQL DBA interview questions and then another one
Advanced MySQL DBA Interview questions.

These are helpful not just to candidates, but to hiring managers, hr, recruiters & everyone in between.

Mythical talent

Since as far back as I can remember, DBAs have been in short supply. In the 90’s I was doing primarily Oracle work. There were never enough technical dbas. Many came from business backgrounds, and didn’t have operating system & hardware fundamentals.

As startups shifted to open source databases in droves during the 00’s, the situation became even worse. I wrote about
The mythical mysql dba – where can we find one?

Will NoSQL databases continue the same trend?

Hire a developer

With a little light humor, we throw some opinions into the fray around hiring devs with How to hire a developer that doesn’t suck.

As devops gains momentum, some see peace between the old-school silos of developers & operations. Some see the need for ops being supplanted by developers. We have some opinions too.

AWS Interview

Are you looking for an Amazon Web Services expert, who knows how to scale in the cloud? Devops & automation also on your mind? Check out
8 Questions to ask an amazon ec2 expert.

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NYC Tech Firms Are Hiring – Map

Made In NY - Startups Hiring

If you haven’t noticed how much the NYC tech scene has grown recently, I’m afraid you’ve been hiding under a rock. It’s simply incredible.

Take a look at Mapped In NY a google maps mashup of the growing list popularized by the NY Tech Meetup called Made In New York.

Join 5000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

[mytweetlinks]

Having been around during the first dot-com boom back in the late 1990’s this is even more exciting to see. Despite the recession, New York’s economy is truly thriving!

[quote]
New York’s Startup scene is truly thriving with a whopping 1263 firms, many of which are hiring.
[/quote]

Why is database administration talent in short supply? They are the Mythical MySQL DBAs

Also take a look at: Why Generalists are Better at Scaling the Web

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Here’s a sample

Hacking Job Search – Three Meaty Ideas

Also find the author on twitter @hullsean.

Demand for talented engineers has never been higher. It is in fact the dirty little secret of the startup industry, that there are simply not enough qualified folks to fill the positions.

What this means for you is that you have a lot of options. What it means for a hiring manager is that you will have to work even harder to find the right candidate. Just going to a recruiter isn’t enough. Use your network, go to meetups, follow Gary’s Guide daily.

Also check out our Mythical MySQL DBA piece where we talk about the shortage of DBAs and operations folks.

Further if you’ve dabbled in freelance or independent consulting, I wrote an interesting an in depth look at Why do people leave consulting. Understanding this can help avoid it in your own career, or avoid your resources leaving for better shores.

Find us on twitter @hullsean and linkedin where we share content and ideas everyday!

1. Build your reputation

As they say, your reputation precedes you. So start building it now. Fulltime or freelance, you want to be known.

Speaking, yes you can do it. Start with some small meetups, volunteer to speak on a topic. A ten person room is easier than 30, 50 or 100. Once you have a couple under your belt, fill out a CFP for Velocity, OSCon or some software developers conference. There are many.

Blog – if you’re not already doing so you should. Start with once a week. Comment on industry topics, controversial ideas, or engineering know-how. Prospects can look at this and learn a lot more than from a business card.

Write a book, yes you can. It may sound impossible, but the truth is that publishers are always looking for technical writers. Pick a topic near and dear to you. It’ll also give you endless material for your blog.

Go to meetups, you really need to be getting out there and networking. Get some Moo Business Cards and start working on your elevator pitch!

Social media – being active here helps your blog, and helps people find you. Twitter is a great place to do this. Interact with colleagues and startup founders, VCs and more. If you’re a hiring manager or CTO, you may find great programmers and devops this way.

We also wrote a more in-depth article Consulting and Freelance 101. It’s a three part guide with a lot of useful nugets.

Also take a look at our MySQL DBA Interview Guide which is as helpful to devops and DBAs as it is to managers hiring them!

[quote]
Above all else, build your network & your reputation. It will put you in front of more people as a person, not a commodity or a resume in a pile of hundreds.
[/quote]

2. Qualify prospects

You definitely don’t want to take the first offer you get, and managers don’t want to hire the first candidate that comes along. You want two or three to choose from. Best way to do this is to have options.

If you’re a candidate, network or work through your colleagues. When you do get a lead, be sure you’re speaking to an economic buyer. If you’re not you’ll need to try to find that person who actually signs the checks. They are the ones who ultimately make the decision, so you want to sell yourself to them.

Get a Deposit – I know I know, if it’s your first freelance job, you don’t want to scare them off. Or maybe you do? The only prospects that would be scared off by this are ones who may not pay down the line. Dragging their feet with a deposit can also mean bureaucratic red tap, so be patient too.

Sara Horowitz has an excellent book Freelancers bible, we recommend you grab a copy right now!

Commodity You Are Not so don’t sell yourself as one. What do I mean? You are not an interchangeable part. You have special skills, you have personality, you have things that you’re particularly good at. These traits are what you need to focus on. The dime-a-dozen skills should sit more in the background.

You’ll also need to price and package your services. We talked about this in-depth in Consulting Essentials – Getting the Business.

We also think there is a reason Why Generalists are better at scaling the web.

3. Play the numbers game

For hiring managers this doesn’t mean working through recruiters that might be bringing subpar talent, it means networking through industry events, meetups, startup pitch and venture capital events. There are a few every single day in NYC and there’s no reason not to go to some of them.

For candidates, be eyeing a few different companies, and following up on more than one prospect. You should really think of this process as an integral and enjoyable part of your career, not a temporary in between stage. Networking doesn’t happen overnight, but from a regular process of meeting and engaging with colleagues over years and years in an industry.

At the end of the day hiring is a numbers game so you should play it as such. Keep searching, and always be watching the horizon.

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