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Is Apple betting against big data?

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1. Pushing privacy

Apple has been pushing it’s privacy policy of late, in much of it’s marketing around the new iOS 8 and iPhone 6.

In particular Tim Cook takes direct aim at Google’s collection of user data:

“A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product. But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy.”

Read: Is Fred Wilson wrong about Apple?

2. Weak in cloud

It’s been quoted in various news that Apple is rather “weak” in the cloud. But digging a little deeper, this appears to be a deliberate strategy, a bet against using customer data in ways those end users may grow to resent.

Also: Is the Android ecosystem still broken?

3. The bet against open worked

Recall that Apple has had a fairly closed ecosystem since the beginning. This has kept their AppStore much cleaner, and free of malware. Reference the terrible problems that still plague the Android Play Store, from lack of policing.

Open also works as an iron fist on UI & UX, enforcing a consistency across apps and developers. This is a clear win for consumers and end users, even if they don’t understand the hows, whys and wherefores.

Related: No iPhones were harmed in the creation of this outage

4. Don’t monetize what you store in iCloud

Apple doesn’t directly monetize what is stored in iCloud. That means there’s no business imperative to make *use* of your data. They’re just storing it. This means they can also push encryption, a win for consumers, as it doesn’t bump heads with their business in any way.

Check this: What is mobile scalability & why is it important?

5. iAd has real privacy limits

Apple does have a platform called iAd. But even that has in-built limitations.

“iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.”

It’s unclear if all of these moves will help Apple in the marketplace. It remains to be seen if consumers will choose technology based on privacy concerns and fears.

Read this: How to increase newsletter signups with nifty iphone trick

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