Tag Archives: expertise

5 ways to level up as cloud expert

aws certified

Cloud computing is blowing up! But don’t take my word for it, read this recent NY Times piece: Tech companies clamor to entice cloud computing experts.

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

Still don’t believe me? Get on the phone with a recruiter or two. They’ll convince you because they’ve got companies banging down the door looking for talent that is plainly in SHORT SUPPLY. And that’s the supply *you* want to be. :)

Check Gary’s Guide Jobs, or the ever popular Angel List Jobs. There’s also Stack Overflow jobs and many more.

1. Become a book reviewer

You’ve already got a technical background, and want to hone those skills. Take a look at technical book reviewing.

Manning is putting out some excellent technical books these days. Apply here to be a reviewer.

Also take a look at Pragmatic Bookshelf. They are are looking for reviewers too.

In either case you can expect to spend time reading a book chapter by chapter, as it’s written, offer strategic or layout advice, feedback on presentation, comprehension, and edits.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

2. Join an Open Source project

There are millions. Flip through github to some that you’re interested in. Contribute a bug fix or comment, reach out to the project leaders.

Afraid to dive in? Join one of the forums or google discussion groups, and lurk for a while. Ask questions, offer a helping hand!

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

3. Self-paced labs

Online education is blowing up, and for good reason. They get the job done & for the right price!

One of my favorites for AWS Certification is the A Cloud Guru courses. These offer lecture style introduction to all levels of AWS from Sysops Administration, Developer & Solutions Architect to Devops, Lambda & CodeDeploy.

The courses are priced right, and geared directly towards Amazon’s certifications. That helps you focus on the right things.

Amazon also partners with qwiklabs to offer courses geared towards getting certified. There are specific ones for the associate & professional certification, and many others besides.

You’ll need to signup for AWS Activate first, before you can use these qwiklabs. They offer you 80 credits right out of the gate.

For the next two weeks many of the courses are free! One thing I really like is they include a free temporary aws login for the students. That way there’s no risk of deploying infrastructure, and accidentally getting a big bill at the end of the month.

The labs though are more like reading documentation versus a nice video course lecture. So you the student have to do a lot more to get through it.

Read: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

4. Coursera, Khanacademy & Udemy

There’s a free class on Coursera called Startup Engineering by Balaji Srinivasan & Vijay Pande. Some pretty amazon material & lectures in here, and if you’re determined, it’s 12 weeks that will get you going on the right foot!

KhanAcademy has a great many courses on computer programming. Awesome and free stuff here. One particularly interesting is their hour of code. For those hesitant, that’s an easy way to jump in!

There is also udemy, which offers some great material on cloud computing. Notice that the certification courses are the same ones from A-Cloud Guru!

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Interview tests

Apply to jobs. Even if you’re unsure if that is your dream job. Why? Because they often include a test to find out about your technical chops. Diving into these tests is a great way to push your own edge. You may do well, you may not. Learn where your weaknesses are.

I especially like the ones where you’re asked to login to a server, configure some things, write some code, and solve a real problem. Nothing beats a real-world example!

Also: Why dropbox didn’t have to fail?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Is there a devops talent gap?

jenkins_docker

New programming languages & services are being invented at a staggering pace. Hosting is changing, networking is changing, race to market is quickening.

But what does all of this mean to the search for talent? Who understands all these components? Who is an expert in any one?

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

1. That new car smell

We all remember that time. You know when you drove out of the dealership with your brand new wheels. Driving down the road, you feel on top of the world. You start dreaming of all the fun times you’ll have in your new car. For days and weeks afterward you walk out to your car, open the door & sit inside. It all feels special. You kind of hang out there for a few minutes enjoying the smell before you drive off. Right?

Let’s be vigilant to remember the same thing happens, or rather is happeing in technology all the time. As we automate our infrastructures with Ansible, Puppet & Chef, deploy continuous integration with Jenkins, Travis or Codeship, we should give pause. Each of these tools has it’s own syntax, it’s own bugs, it’s own community, it’s own speed of development & change, it’s own life.

Also: Does a four letter word divide dev & ops?

2. A lot of rushing

Google tells me the synonyms of agile are, nimble, lithe, supple & acrobatic. So in a fast moving world it’s no wonder agile is so big. Anything that allows us to respond to customers quicker & evolve our product faster is a good thing. Yes it is.

Over the years I’ve worked with a lot of clients & customers. Some right out of the gates are in a hurry. There is a sense of urgency even from the initial meeting. Although not in every case, sometimes these are the sign of the perpetually late. They end up throwing money around, throwing technology around, and all in a desperate attempt to plug a leaking ship.

In our race to automate & remain agile & nimble, we should also consider the future. Lets attempt to find a balance & consider future implications of technology decisions & choices.

Read: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Hosting, what’s that?

For many of the startups I work with today, they’ve never deployed on anything but Amazon. There was no rack of computers in a closet & a T1 line, circa 1997. There was no rackspace hosted servers or a colo in New Jersey circa 2005. Right from the beginning it was all on-demand computing.

This shift has surely brought a lot of benefit. But no one can argue it isn’t still very new. And with newness there is a learning curve. And bugs & surprises.

Related: Does a devop need to practice the art of resistance?

4. More complexity in troubleshooting

The wild ride really begins when you’re troubleshooting performance problems. Running your database on RDS you say? How the heck do I get to the terminal and run “top”? Can I do an iostat?

And what does iostat output really mean in multi-tenant Amazon, where your disk is an EBS volume across an unknown & unfriendly network. Who knows why it just slowed to a crawl, then sped up dramatically a few minutes later.

Even fetching the relevant logfile can be complicated. For all the problems the cloud eliminates, it sure introduces a few of it’s own. And who is the expert, and how to find them?

Read this: When fat fingers take down your database

5. More tech, fewer experts

I asked the question a few weeks back Do todays startups require assembly of a lot of parts that no one really understands?.

I’ve taken to browsing the stacks at the lovely StackShare site lately. There you can see what some of the top startups are using for their technology stacks. Docker, Yammer, Yelp, Stripe, Vine, Spotify & Stack Overflow are all there today.

There are new message queues like NSQ & programming languages like Markdown, Coffeescript & Clojure. Even Java. Are people still building web apps in Java. No please no!

While it’s wonderful to see such an explosion of innovation, I look at this from an operations perspective. In five years, when the first & second wave of developers at your startup have left, picture yourself trying to find talent in a long since out-of-fashion language like Dart or Swift. What’s more how do you untangle the mess you’ve now built?

Check this: Is the SQL database dead?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

iHeavy Insights 75 – Recognizing Quality

Finding good vendors who provide professional services may have a lot in common with finding good restaurants.  There may be an abundance of them, while the best ones remain difficult to find.

A long line does not mean quality food

Some restaurants have a long line because they have slow service.  If that’s because you’re getting quality personalized service, great.  But if it’s because of incompetence and general disorganization or because they can’t keep quality help, that’s another story.

Hype and marketing can bring a lot of customers to a new restaurant.  Sometimes it’s a celebrity chef or architect.  If that’s what you’re after then you may be at the right place.  If you’re looking for the best home cooked meal, you may have to keep looking.

Convenience and location can also bring long lines.  Finding a restaurant on the main street or square is usually not the one with the best food.

A better way to find quality

Take a look at how long the restaurant has been around.  A service provider who has been in business for a long time has obviously been successful at acquiring customers, solving their problems, and charging a fee that matches both their needs and those of their customers.

Check the testimonials of your provider.  If their website doesn’t list some, ask for one or two customers that they’ve worked with recently.

Pay attention to service.  If you are a small fish for your vendor, it’s likely that service will be affected.  If you on the other hand are one of your vendors bigger clients, they’ll likely give much more attention to you.  Notice how regular customers at a restaurant or lounge tend to get the best service.

Book Review:  The Power of Pull by Hagel, Brown & Davison

A lot of really influential people like this book.  Joichi Ito, Richard Florida and Eric Schmidt to name a few.  Enterprises are faced with a bewildering array of challenges from finding good people, to retaining them, and putting them to work in the most creative ways.  This book brings another new and welcome perspective on the future of building and growing successful organizations.