Tag Archives: entrepreneurship

5 cloud ideas that aren’t actually true

storm coming

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Cloud computing is heralding us into a wonderful era where computing can be bought in small increments, like a utility. This changes the whole way we plan, manage budgets, and accelerates startups making them more agile.

But it’s not all wine & roses up there. I’ve heard a few refrains from clients over the years, and thought I’d share some of the most common.

1. Scaling is automatic

Rather recently I was working with a client on building some sophisticated reports. They needed to slice & dice customer data, over various time series, and summarize with invoices & tracking data. Unfortunately their dataset was large, in the half terabyte range.


Client: Can we just load all this data into the cloud?
Me: Yes we can do that. Build a system in Amazon public cloud, can support large datasets.
Client: I want it to scale easily. So we won’t have these slow reports. And as we add data, it’ll just manage it easily for us.
Me: Well it’s a little bit more complicated than that, unfortunately.

Unfortunately this is a rather familiar conversation that I have quite often. A lot of the press around cloud scalability, centers around auto-scaling, Amazon’s renowned & superb virtualization feature. Yes it’s true you can roll out webservers to scale out this way, but that’s not the end of the story. Typically web applications have a lot of components, from caching servers, to search servers, and of course their backend datastore.

But can we scrap our relational database, such as MySQL and go with one that scales out of the box like Riak, Cassandra or Dynamodb?

Those NoSQL solutions are built to be distributed from the start, it’s true. And they lend themselves to that type of architecture. However, if you’ve built up a dataset in MySQL or Oracle, and more so an application around that, you’ll have to migrate data into the NoSQL solution. That process will take some time.

Like teaching a fish to fly, it make take some time. They do well in water, but evolution takes a bit longer.

Related: RDS or MySQL 10 use cases

2. Disaster recovery is free

In the traditional datacenter, when you want DR, you setup a parallel environment. Hopefully not in the same room, same city or same coast even. Preferrably you do so in a different region. What you can’t get around is dishing out cash for that second datacenter. You need the servers, just in case.

In the cloud, things are different. That’s why we’re here, right? In amazon you have regions already setup & available for plugin-n-play use. Setup your various components, servers, software & configure. Once you’ve verified you can failover to the parallel environment you can just turn off all those instances. Great, no big charges for all that iron that you’d pay for to keep the rooms warm in an old-school datacenter. Or do you?

As it turns out, since you don’t have this environment running all the time, you’ll want to test it more often, run fire drills to bring the servers back online. That’ll incur some costs in terms of manpower. You’ll also want to include in there some scripts to start those servers up, and/or some detailed documentation on how to do that. And don’t lose that documentation, either will you?

You may also want to build some infrastructure as code unit tests. Things change, code checkouts evolve, especially in the agile & continuous integration world. Devops beware!

Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

3. Machines are fast

Fast, fast, fast. That’s what we expect, things keep getting faster, right? Hard to believe then that the world of computing took a big step backward when it jumped into the cloud. Something similar happened when we jumped to commodity Linux a decade ago.

In amazon, it’s a multi-tenant world. And just like apartment buildings, popular restaurants, or busy highways you must share. When things are quiet you may have the road to yourself, but it’ll never be as quiet as a dirt road in the country!

Amazon is making big strides though. They now offer memory optimized & storage optimized instances. And an even bigger development is the addition of the most important feature for performance & scalability. That said the network & EBS can still be a real bottleneck.

Also: What is a relational database & why is it important?

4. Backups aren’t necessary

I’ve experienced a few horror stories over the years. I wrote about one noteworthy one When fat fingers take down your business.

True EBS snapshots make backing up your whole server, well a snap! That said a few extra steps have to happen (flush the filesystem & lock tables) to make this work for a relational database like MySQL or Oracle. And suddenly you have a verification step that you also need to perform. You see no backups are valid until they’ve been restored, remember?

But even with these wonderful disk snapshots, you’ll still want to do database dumps, and perhaps table dumps. Operator error, deleting the wrong data, or dropping the wrong tables, will always be a risk. Ignore backups at your own peril!

Check this: Why CTOs underestimate operational costs

5. Outages won’t happen

In an ideal world, everything is redundant, and outages will be a thing of the past. We’ll finally reach five nines uptime and devops everywhere will be out of work. :)

It’s true that Amazon provides all the components to build redundancy into your architecture, and very cutting edge firms that have taken netflix’s approach with chaos monkey are seeing big improvements here. But AirBNB did fail and at root it was an Amazon outage that shouldn’t ever happen.

Read: Why Oracle won’t kill MySQL

Get more. Monthly insights about scalability, startups & innovation.. Our latest Are SQL Databases Dead?

A master isn't born but made

A review of Mastery by Robert Greene.

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

Robert Greene’s 48 Laws of Power was a great read, offering endless lessons for business and personal dealings. When I saw he just published a new book, I was quick to grab a copy.

What I like about his writing is that he’s replete with counterintuitive bits of wisdom, that really offer new perspectives on old topics.

[quote]
Many people might find the notion of an apprenticeship and skill acquisition as quaint relics of bygone eras when work meant making things. After all, we have entered the information and computer age, in which technology makes it so we can di without the kinds of menial tasks that require practice and repetition; so many things have become virtual in our lives making the craftsman model obsolete. Or so the argument goes.
[/quote]

You might also enjoy our 3 part consulting 101 guide and our very popular DBA hiring guide.

He goes on to elaborate on this idea…

[quote]
In truth, however, this idea of the nature of the times we are living in is completely incorrect, even dangerous. The era we have entered is not one in which technology will make everything easier, but rather a time of increased complexity that affects every field. In business, competition has become globalized and more intense. A business person must have a command of a much larger picture than in the past, which means more knowledge and skills. The future in science does not lie in specialization but rather in combining and cross-fertilization of knowledge in various fields. In the arts, tastes and styles are changing at an accelerated rate. An artist must be on top of this and capable of creating new forms, always remaining ahead of the curve. This often requires having more than just a specialized knowledge of that particular art form — it requires knowing other arts, even the sciences, and what is happening in the world.
[/quote]

I couldn’t agree more. We wrote a piece a while back called Why generalists are better at scaling the web and that aligns nicely with what Greene is getting at here.

He begins with insight on finding ones life task, then apprenticeship & mentoring then working through the social challenges that are always present and finally ways to stimulate the creative-active impulses.

I really like that he emphasizes it as a process and one of life-long hard work. This resonates a lot for me, as that’s how I’ve found success doing independent consulting over the years. There have been a lot of ups and downs, wrong turns, and missteps, but tenacity wins out in the end. He even dispells the myth of the naturally gifted, such as Mozart or Einstein, arguing that in fact they did put in the requisite 10,000 hours of study and were not born with mastery as such.

Greene’s lastest book is a pleasure to read, and full of insight for startups, programmers, designers and business people alike. I highly recommend it.

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