Tag Archives: entrepreneur

5 data points I track for reputation & career building

When I tell people I’ve been independent for two decades, they often look at me surprised. How do you do that? How do you keep business coming in?

recent linkedin views

Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

As a freelancer you surely have to be on top of changing trends, and where the wind is blowing. But whether you’re a CEO or CTO of a larger firm, or a developer, HR or marketing director, you can also benefit by actively tracking yourself. Career building never ends…

1. Real Leads

This is probably the hardest metric to track, but the most important. A lead is anyone who may potentially hire my services. These can come from Linkedin, newsletter subscribers, or via a Google search. I track how they reached me, and how warm the lead is.

I do also track when recruiters reach out, as I think this can serve as a useful barometer as well. Also as my blog has grown, I get a lot of SEO bloggers, fishing for sites they can post backlinks on. Although I rarely entertain them, it is a useful reflection of how popular your site is getting.

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

2. Newsletter signups

I think of the newsletter as an extension of my blog. I invite everyone I’ve ever touched in business. This includes coworkers, to colleagues at meetups & conferences. I invite recruiters & headhunters as well, because name recognition & reputation building is also important.

The newsletter is a way to show up in the inbox of everybody you’ve ever worked with. Month after month, year in and year out, you’re plodding away & doing your thing. It’s a reminder that you’re out there, and colleagues, CEOs & CTOs refer me all the time. It’s been very valuable over ten years.

newsletter signups

I also track email opens & email clicks. Those range around 25% and 10% respectively. I know when I’ve hit a topic that resonates & try to have that inform future content direction.

Related: The Myth of Five Nines

3. Linkedin Views

Linkedin is super valuable too. They provide a nice graph of how many times your profile was viewed weekly through to the last 90 days. This is super useful to find out if your resume & profile is keyword rich.

I like to actively tweak my profile, for the latest trending terminology. For example in the 90’s Unix Administrator or Systems Administrator was common, but nowadays everyone likes to say SRE. What’s that? Site Reliability Engineer. Yes it’s a buzzword, and as it turns out people use trending terms & buzzwords to search for people with your skills.

So get on it, and edit those terms!

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

4. Website Visitors

In a services business you don’t usually sell widgets on your website. However, I like to think of a web presense as my business card. So in that light, more visitors means more renown. That projects your personal brand, and builds it long term.

website visitors

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

5. Klout Score

Klout score is a rough measure of how active you are across social media. Twitter is a big one, but it also finds you on Linkedin & other platforms as well. Although the score is far from perfect, it does give you a sense of reputation & noteriety, which do ultimately translate to business.

Also: 5 Things Toxic To Scalability

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5 cloud ideas that aren’t actually true

storm coming

Join 20,000 others and follow Sean Hull’s scalability, startup & innovation content on twitter @hullsean.

Cloud computing is heralding us into a wonderful era where computing can be bought in small increments, like a utility. This changes the whole way we plan, manage budgets, and accelerates startups making them more agile.

But it’s not all wine & roses up there. I’ve heard a few refrains from clients over the years, and thought I’d share some of the most common.

1. Scaling is automatic

Rather recently I was working with a client on building some sophisticated reports. They needed to slice & dice customer data, over various time series, and summarize with invoices & tracking data. Unfortunately their dataset was large, in the half terabyte range.


Client: Can we just load all this data into the cloud?
Me: Yes we can do that. Build a system in Amazon public cloud, can support large datasets.
Client: I want it to scale easily. So we won’t have these slow reports. And as we add data, it’ll just manage it easily for us.
Me: Well it’s a little bit more complicated than that, unfortunately.

Unfortunately this is a rather familiar conversation that I have quite often. A lot of the press around cloud scalability, centers around auto-scaling, Amazon’s renowned & superb virtualization feature. Yes it’s true you can roll out webservers to scale out this way, but that’s not the end of the story. Typically web applications have a lot of components, from caching servers, to search servers, and of course their backend datastore.

But can we scrap our relational database, such as MySQL and go with one that scales out of the box like Riak, Cassandra or Dynamodb?

Those NoSQL solutions are built to be distributed from the start, it’s true. And they lend themselves to that type of architecture. However, if you’ve built up a dataset in MySQL or Oracle, and more so an application around that, you’ll have to migrate data into the NoSQL solution. That process will take some time.

Like teaching a fish to fly, it make take some time. They do well in water, but evolution takes a bit longer.

Related: RDS or MySQL 10 use cases

2. Disaster recovery is free

In the traditional datacenter, when you want DR, you setup a parallel environment. Hopefully not in the same room, same city or same coast even. Preferrably you do so in a different region. What you can’t get around is dishing out cash for that second datacenter. You need the servers, just in case.

In the cloud, things are different. That’s why we’re here, right? In amazon you have regions already setup & available for plugin-n-play use. Setup your various components, servers, software & configure. Once you’ve verified you can failover to the parallel environment you can just turn off all those instances. Great, no big charges for all that iron that you’d pay for to keep the rooms warm in an old-school datacenter. Or do you?

As it turns out, since you don’t have this environment running all the time, you’ll want to test it more often, run fire drills to bring the servers back online. That’ll incur some costs in terms of manpower. You’ll also want to include in there some scripts to start those servers up, and/or some detailed documentation on how to do that. And don’t lose that documentation, either will you?

You may also want to build some infrastructure as code unit tests. Things change, code checkouts evolve, especially in the agile & continuous integration world. Devops beware!

Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

3. Machines are fast

Fast, fast, fast. That’s what we expect, things keep getting faster, right? Hard to believe then that the world of computing took a big step backward when it jumped into the cloud. Something similar happened when we jumped to commodity Linux a decade ago.

In amazon, it’s a multi-tenant world. And just like apartment buildings, popular restaurants, or busy highways you must share. When things are quiet you may have the road to yourself, but it’ll never be as quiet as a dirt road in the country!

Amazon is making big strides though. They now offer memory optimized & storage optimized instances. And an even bigger development is the addition of the most important feature for performance & scalability. That said the network & EBS can still be a real bottleneck.

Also: What is a relational database & why is it important?

4. Backups aren’t necessary

I’ve experienced a few horror stories over the years. I wrote about one noteworthy one When fat fingers take down your business.

True EBS snapshots make backing up your whole server, well a snap! That said a few extra steps have to happen (flush the filesystem & lock tables) to make this work for a relational database like MySQL or Oracle. And suddenly you have a verification step that you also need to perform. You see no backups are valid until they’ve been restored, remember?

But even with these wonderful disk snapshots, you’ll still want to do database dumps, and perhaps table dumps. Operator error, deleting the wrong data, or dropping the wrong tables, will always be a risk. Ignore backups at your own peril!

Check this: Why CTOs underestimate operational costs

5. Outages won’t happen

In an ideal world, everything is redundant, and outages will be a thing of the past. We’ll finally reach five nines uptime and devops everywhere will be out of work. :)

It’s true that Amazon provides all the components to build redundancy into your architecture, and very cutting edge firms that have taken netflix’s approach with chaos monkey are seeing big improvements here. But AirBNB did fail and at root it was an Amazon outage that shouldn’t ever happen.

Read: Why Oracle won’t kill MySQL

Get more. Monthly insights about scalability, startups & innovation.. Our latest Are SQL Databases Dead?

5 Things Frans Johansson says about innovation

medici affect johansson

You may not have heard of Medici before, but you’ve probably heard of the renaissance. The medici family hosted the round tables, the meetups, the social gatherings & mixers. They brought diverse artisans engineers & thinkers together, and the world hasn’t been the same since!

b>Join 16,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

In the Medici Effect, Frans dissects what this famous family did. His case studies include the likes of Richard Branson, Deepak Chopra, Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, Orit Gadiesh, Marcus Samuelsson, George Soros & our own favorite Linus Torvalds,

What he discovered really surprised me.

1. Swim at the intersection

Hanging out with folks in your field is great. Whether you’re a physician, financial analyst, Ruby programmer, or artist. But it won’t expose us to enough new ideas. To get that, you need to hang out with those in other disciplines. Learn a language, take dance classes, try your hand at a new sport, or attend meetups of wedding planners or DJs. Whatever it takes to get out of your comfort zone is what will put you at the intersection.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

2. You need quantity to get quality

This was a very surprising finding of their research. One might think that greats like Albert Einstein were geniuses from the start. But it turns out one consistent factor between all these folks is the quantity of their attempts. They came up with many many ideas, and chased as many as they could. Of course they are only remembered for their successes, but this hides the underlying mathematics. It’s a numbers game in almost all of these cases.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

3. Peel all the potatoes and cook them together

Peel one potato and cook it. Then peel another and cook it. Doesn’t sound like a recipe for efficiently preparing dinner does it? Turns out it’s also not great for innovating. Peel & prepare many ideas at once, and try to execute them in parallel if you can. That’s what these greats have done.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

4. Be ok with more failures

This is a tricky one. But Johansson puts in perspective with this key quote:

”Inaction is far worse than failure.”

Viewed that way, our caution about diving into a new idea seems more limiting. True it costs money, time & resources to pursue new ideas, ventures & startups. So be sure to reserve resources. That’s right spend that money & time carefully lest you run out before hitting on the big one.

He also says to be suspicious of low failure rates. In yourself or those you’re evaluating. This probably indicates you’re not risking enough, or trying new things constantly.

Read this: Why Oracle Won’t Kill MySQL

5. break out of your network

Your network is powerful to pursue your career, or following existing well traveled paths. But they can be an obstacle when forging new paths, which is what innovation is all about.

So break away from your networks. One way you can do this is by building a new one. But be sure to surround yourself with diverse cultures, upbringing, backgrounds & expertise.

Also: RDS or MySQL 10 Use Cases

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Why do people leave consulting?

Join 12,100 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

As a long time freelancer, it’s a question that’s intrigued me for some time. I do have some theories…

First, definitions… I’m not talking about working for a large consulting firm. Although this role may be called “consultant”, my meaning is consultant as sole proprietor, entrepreneur, gun for hire or lone wolf.

1. Make more money in a fulltime role

I’ve met a lot of people who fall into this trap. They take a fulltime role simply because it pays better. That raises a lot of questions…

o Are you pricing right?

You could be pricing to high to get *enough* work. You may also be pricing too low to cover benefits, health insurance and so forth. Or perhaps you can’t sell to your rate. You can be smart skills-wise, but do you feel your clients pain? Are you good at being a businessman? Consistent?

o Can you sell, and put together an appealing proposal?

o Can you execute to the clients satisfaction?

o Can you followup consistently while accounts payable gets tied up in knots?

o Can you followup if your client executes past their spend?

Running a business is complicated, and a lot of expenses can be hard to juggle. You will find times when a client may have spent a little faster than their revenue, and have trouble finding money when the invoice arrives. Followup, patience and persistence is key.

Read: Why high availability is so very hard to deliver

Want more? We wrote an in depth 3 part guide to consulting.

2. Make a consistent paycheck in a fulltime position

o Are you networking enough?

If you take a longterm gig and get comfortable, your pipeline can dry up. And your pipeline is the key to your longterm strength, and regular business. You must get out there, and let people know about you, your services, and your availability.

If you don’t network regularly, post across the web, engage on social media channels, blog regularly and so forth, you’ll likely just land a series of 6-12 month fulltimeish gigs through recruiters or headshops.

Related: 5 ways to evaluate independent consultants

[quote]Being a freelancer or entrepreneur involves wearing many hats. Finding business involves networking & marketing. Delivering to their needs involves emotional intelligence. And actually getting paid on time is a whole artform in itself. Leave a good taste in their mouth and your reputation will spread quickly by word of mouth.[/quote]

o Do you really *LIKE* being an entrepreneur?

Are you consistent? Consulting is like running a marathon, if you burn out you may give up!

Have a large web property or application which is experiencing some growing pains? Take a look at how we do performance reviews. It may be just what you’re looking for.

Related: MySQL interview guide for managers and candidates alike

3. Do you like the lifestyle of larger corporate environments?

o Fulltime roles allow for much more jedi sword play. Maneuvering up the ranks involves relationship building as much as consulting, but with a more well defined ladder to climb.

o Sometimes you’ll find pass the buck and pointing fingers quite common.

o There are roles involving managing people and processes. These less often lend themselves to short term or situational consulting arrangements. If you lean towards those roles

Trying to hire top tech talent? Here’s our MySQL DBA hiring guide & interview questions

[quote]Working as a sole proprietor for a couple of decades has taught me to be very entrepreneurial. It is every bit about building a real-world startup[/quote]

4. Want to do more cutting edge & at the keyboard work

Consulting can and often does allow you to bump into the latest technologies, and get your feet wet with what cutting edge firms are doing. However in a fulltime role you can more completely immerse yourself in the technology, and those long term solutions.

Also: Why devops talent is in short supply

o You can take part in R&D – Google’s 20% projects, for example

o You can build hypothetical projects

o You can work in more idealistic environments, operations and even lectures & training

Though you can certainly do all of this as a freelancer, you have to build enough capital, and so forth to make it work.

Juggling job roles as a consultant isn’t easy. What a CTO must never do.

5. Don’t like running a small business

Consulting as a sole proprietor and staying in business for almost twenty years, I’ve learned that it is every bit about running a small business or startup.

A. Acquiring customers, networking, marketing
B. Understanding their needs and delivering to improve their position
C. Pricing in a your customers understand
D. Offering value to your customers, at a competitive price
E. Managing relationships so your brand or reputation precedes you
F. Making sure payments and invoicing isn’t a hurdle, followup
G. Pacing yourself like a marathon runner – keep doing what you’re doing right

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