Tag Archives: employees

How do we measure devotion?


I was talking recently over email with a hiring manager. Jamie (not his real name) wanted to hire me, but was set against consulting. While that by itself is understandable, he seemed to equate it with devotion. This troubled me. Here’s the quote below.

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While I am sure your skills are excellent, I guess what I am trying to gauge is your desire to quit consulting and join us full time.  I am looking for you to share my vision of changing publishing through data.   Let me be clear: I am not looking for a contractor.  Acme is a fabulous company and I need a person devoted to Acme and to our data assets.

1. Devotion on vacation

Here’s my response. All names have been changed.

I understand Jamie.

I hear you about devotion, I think it’s very important too.  In 2010, I was working at MGC.  After 3 months, they hired a large remote DBA firm out of Canada, to manage the database systems & my contract concluded.  

A few weeks later and a few hours before a plane flight,  I got a harried call.  Can you help us? Database replication is broken & our site is offline.   I jumped on skype to chat with the team, even as I was packing my bags.  I went to the airport, and got on WIFI again.  In-flight on my way to California I remained online to help repair the systems & bring everything back.  It took a few more days and half of my vacation to get things working again, but I wanted to help.

My boss at MGC kept me on for 1 ½ year after that.  He felt I was devoted & gave them the very best service.  

If you change your mind, or would like to discuss further, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Also: What happens when clients don’t pay?

2. Devotion to a manager

I had another experience years back with company Media Inc. Working under a very good CTO, I was surrounded by a team who was also very loyal to him. After about a year, he decided to leave. He had gotten a very enticing offer from another firm. Although he made a great effort to leave the ship in good condition, the crew felt the ship rocking a bit. A temporary CTO was brought on who had a very different style.

As the ship continued to rock at sea, finally a new CTO was found. He however was not popular at all. He had a swagger & tended to throw his weight around, irritating the team, and making them fear they might be thrown from the ship. Slowly they began to leave. After three months, six out of eight on the team had left. There was one old-school Oracle guy still left, and me.

Although he certainly had a different style than the previous boss, it didn’t bother me much. I told him I’d stay as long as he needed me. I was also working remote so I didn’t deal with some of the day-to-day politics.

My devotion was to the business, databases & systems. I accomplished this by being devoted to my own business.

Related: Why I ask customers for a deposit?

3. Devotion to vesting

I worked at another firm about three years ago. Let’s call them Growing Fast Inc. While the firm itself was gaining ground & getting customers like Nike & Wallmart, it still had an engineering team of only ten. You could say it was boxing way above it’s weight.

While it tried to grow, it hired an outside CTO to help. His style was primarily management facing, while the teams problems were based in technology. With tons of technical debt & a lack of real leadership, the engineering team was floundering. Lots of infighting was making things worse.

Suddenly a key team member decided to quit. The following week another, and after that two more. All told four left. When you consider how small the team was, and further that the remaining members were basically founders a different picture emerges. Four out of six (non-founders) had left in two weeks, roughly 66% of the engineering team. The only other guy who stayed had his visa sponsored by Growing Fast Inc.

The founders who stayed were all vested. Everyone else quit because of mismanagement.

Read: 5 conversational ways to evaluate great consultants

4. Devotion to code & data

In an industry as competitive as software & technology, it’s often devotion to building things that wins the day. Using the latest & greatest languages, databases & tech stack can carry a lot of weight.

Managing technical debt can make a difference too. Developers don’t want to be asked to constantly walk a minefield of other developers mistakes. A minefield needs to be cleaned up, for the business to flourish.

Also: 5 things I learned about trust & advising clients?

5. Devotion through & through

Running a startup isn’t easy. Many fail after 3 or 5 years. I’m devoted to business.  I’ve been an entrepreneur for 20 years, and built it into a success.  

The year after 9/11 & again after 2008 were the most difficult periods to tough it out.  It’s been hard fought & I wouldn’t shutter the doors of my own business easily.  It affords me the opportunity to attend AWS popup loft hearing lectures, going to conferences & meetups & blogging about technology topics, & pivoting with the technological winds change.  

I’ve found all of this makes me extremely valuable to firms looking for expertise.  I have independence & perspective that’s hard to find.  I’m also there for firms that have been looking to fill a role, and need help sooner rather than later.

Also: A CTO must never do this

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Locking down cloud systems from disgruntled engineers

medieval gate fortified aws

I worked at a customer last year, on a short term assignment. A brilliant engineer had built their infrastructure, automated deployments, and managed all the systems. Sadly despite all the sleepless nights, and dedication, they hadn’t managed to build up good report with management.

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I’ve seen this happen so many times, and I do find it a bit sad. Here’s an engineer who’s working his butt off, really wants the company to succeed. Really cares about the systems. But doesn’t connect well with people, often is dismissive, disrespectful or talks down to people like they’re stupid. All burns bridges, and there’s a lot of bad feelings between all parties.

How to manage the exit process. Here’s a battery of recommendations for changing credentials & logins so that systems can’t be accessed anymore.

1. Lock out API access

You can do this by removing the administrator role or any other role their IAM user might have. That way you keep the account around *just in case*. This will also prevent them from doing anything on the console, but you can see if they attempt any logins.

Also: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

2. Lock out of servers

They may have the private keys for various serves in your environment. So to lock them out, scan through all the security groups, and make sure their whitelisted IPs are gone.

Are you using a bastion box for access? That’s ideal because then you only have one accesspoint. Eliminate their login and audit access there. Then you’ve covered your bases.

Related: Does Amazon eat it’s own dogfood?

3. Update deployment keys

At one of my customers the outgoing op had setup many moving parts & automated & orchestrated all the deployment processes beautifully. However he also used his personal github key inside jenkins. So when it went to deploy, it used those credentials to get the code from github. Oops.

We ended up creating a company github account, then updating jenkins with those credentials. There were of course other places in the capistrano bits that also needed to be reviewed.

Read: Is aws a patient that needs constant medication?

4. Dashboard logins

Monitoring with NewRelic or Nagios? Perhaps you have a centralized dashboard for your internal apps? Or you’re using Slack?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

5. Non-key based logins

Have some servers outside of AWS in a traditional datacenter? Or even servers in AWS that are using usernames & passwords? Be sure to audit the full list of systems, and change passwords or disable accounts for the outgoing sysop.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters