Tag Archives: elastic compute cloud

Amazon Web Services – What is it and why is it important?

Amazon Web Services is a division of Amazon the bookseller, but this part of the business is devoted solely to infrastructure and internet servers.  These are the building blocks of data centers, the workhorses of the internet.  AWS’s offering of Cloud Computing solutions allows a business to setup or “spinup” in the jargon of cloud computing, new compute resources at will.  Need a small single cpu 32bit ubuntu server with two 20G disks attached?  One command and 30 seconds away, and you can have that!

As we discussed previously, Infrastructure Provisioning has evolved dramatically over the past fifteen years from something took time and cost a lot, to a fast automatic process that it is today with cloud computing.  This has also brought with it a dramatic culture shift in the way that systems administration is being done, from a fairly manual process of physical machines, and software configuration, one that took weeks to setup new services, to a scriptable and automateable process that can then take seconds.

This new realm of cloud computing infrastructure and provisioning is called Infrastructure as a Service or IaaS, and Amazon Web Services is one of the largest providers of such compute resources.  They’re not the only ones of course.  Others include:

  • Rackspace Cloud
  • Joyent
  • GoGrid
  • Terremark
  • 3Tera
  • IBM
  • Microsoft
  • Enomaly
  • AT&T

Cloud Computing is still in it’s infancy, but is growing quickly.   Amazon themselves had a major data center outage in April that we discussed in detail. It sent some hot internet startups into a tailspin!

More discussion of Amazon Web Services on Quora – Sean Hull

IOPs – What is it and why is it important?

IOPs are an attempt to standardize comparison of disk speeds across different environments.  When you turn on a computer, everything must be read from disk, but thereafter things are kept in memory.  However applications typically read and write to disk frequently.  When you move to enterprise class applications, especially relational databases, a lot of disk I/O is happening so performance of disk resources is crucial.

For a basic single SATA drive that you might have in server or laptop, you can typically get 30-40 IOPs from it.  These numbers vary if you are talking about random versus sequential reads or writes.  Picture the needle on a vinyl record.  It moves quicker around the center, and slower around the outside.  That’s what’s happening the the magnetic needle inside your harddrive too.

In Amazon EC2 environment, there is a lot of variability in performance from EBS.  You can stripe across four separate EBS volumes which will be on four different locations on the underlying RAID array and you’ll get a big boost in disk I/O.  Also disk performance will vary from an m1.small, m1.large and m1.xlarge instance type, with the latter getting the lions share of network bandwidth, so better disk I/O performance.  But in the end your best EBS performance will be in the range of 500-1000 IOPs.  That’s not huge by physical hardware standards, so an extremely disk intensive application will probably not perform well in the Amazon cloud.

Still the economic pressures and infrastructure and business flexibility continue to push cloud computing adoption, so expect the trend to continue.

Quora discussion – What are IOPs and why are they important?