Tag Archives: EBS performance

3 Ways to Boost Cloud Scalability

Deploying in the Amazon cloud is touted as a great way to achieve high scalability while paying only for the computing power you use. How do you get the best scalability from the technology? Continue reading 3 Ways to Boost Cloud Scalability

IOPs – What is it and why is it important?

IOPs are an attempt to standardize comparison of disk speeds across different environments.  When you turn on a computer, everything must be read from disk, but thereafter things are kept in memory.  However applications typically read and write to disk frequently.  When you move to enterprise class applications, especially relational databases, a lot of disk I/O is happening so performance of disk resources is crucial.

For a basic single SATA drive that you might have in server or laptop, you can typically get 30-40 IOPs from it.  These numbers vary if you are talking about random versus sequential reads or writes.  Picture the needle on a vinyl record.  It moves quicker around the center, and slower around the outside.  That’s what’s happening the the magnetic needle inside your harddrive too.

In Amazon EC2 environment, there is a lot of variability in performance from EBS.  You can stripe across four separate EBS volumes which will be on four different locations on the underlying RAID array and you’ll get a big boost in disk I/O.  Also disk performance will vary from an m1.small, m1.large and m1.xlarge instance type, with the latter getting the lions share of network bandwidth, so better disk I/O performance.  But in the end your best EBS performance will be in the range of 500-1000 IOPs.  That’s not huge by physical hardware standards, so an extremely disk intensive application will probably not perform well in the Amazon cloud.

Still the economic pressures and infrastructure and business flexibility continue to push cloud computing adoption, so expect the trend to continue.

Quora discussion – What are IOPs and why are they important?

Migrating to the Cloud – Why and why not?

A lot of technical forums and discussions have highlighted the limitations of EC2 and how it loses  on performance when compared to physical servers of equal cost.  They argue that you can get much more hardware and bigger iron for the same money.  So it then seems foolhardy to turn to the cloud.  Why this mad rush to the cloud then?  Of course if all you’re looking at is performance, it might seem odd indeed.  But another way of looking at it is, if performance is not as good, it’s clearly not the driving factor to cloud adoption.

CIOs and CTOs are often asking questions more along the lines of, “Can we deploy in the cloud and settle with the performance limitations, and if so how do we get there?”

Another question, “Is it a good idea to deploy your database in the cloud?”  It depends!  Let’s take a look at some of the strengths and weaknesses, then you decide.

8 big strengths of the cloud

  1. Flexibility in disaster recovery – it becomes a script, no need to buy additional hardware
  2. Easier roll out of patches and upgrades
  3. Reduced operational headache – scripting and automation becomes central
  4. Uniquely suited to seasonal traffic patterns – keep online only the capacity you’re using
  5. Low initial investment
  6. Auto-scaling – set thresholds and deploy new capacity automatically
  7. Easy compromise response – take server offline and spinup a new one
  8. Easy setup of dev, qa & test environments

Some challenges with deploying in the cloud

  1. Big cultural shift in how operations is done
  2. Lower SLAs and less reliable virtual servers – mitigate with automation
  3. No perimeter security – new model for managing & locking down servers
  4. Where is my data?  — concerns over compliance and privacy
  5. Variable disk performance – can be problematic for MySQL databases
  6. New procurement process can be a hurdle

Many of these challenges can be mitigated against.  The promise of the infrastructure deployed in the cloud is huge, so digging our heels in with gradual adoption is perhaps the best option for many firms.  Mitigate the weaknesses of the cloud by:

  • Use encrypted filesystems and backups where necessary
  • Also keep offsite backups inhouse or at an alternate cloud provider
  • Mitigate against EBS performance – cache at every layer of your application stack
  • Employ configuration management & automation tools such as Puppet & Chef

Quora discussion – Why or why not to migrate to the cloud?