Tag Archives: continuous integration

Marching towards continuous deployment

cute code pipeline

If you’re like a lot of small dev teams & startups, you’ve dreamed of jumping on the continuous deployment train, but still aren’t quite there.

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You’ve got your code in some sort of repository. Now what? As it turns out the concepts aren’t terribly complicated. The hardest part is figuring out the process that works for your team.

1. Make a single script for deployment

Can you build easily? You want to take steps to simplify the build process & work towards everything being done from a single script. This might be an ant or maven script. It might be rake if you’re using ruby. Or it might be a makefile. Either way it organizes dependencies, checks your system & compiles things if necessary.

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2. Do nightly builds

If you’re currently doing manual builds, work towards doing them nightly. Once you have that under your belt you can actually schedule these to happen automatically every night. But you’re not there yet. You want to work to improve the build process first. Work on the performance of this process. Quality is also important. Is the build quality poor?

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3. Is your build process slow?

If it takes a long time to do the build, it takes a long time to get to the point where you can smoke test. You want to shorten this time, so you can iterate faster. Look at ways to improve the overall performance of the whole chain. What’s it getting stuck on?

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4. Is your build quality poor?

Your tests are going to verify application functionality, do security checks, performance or even compliance checks. If these are often failing, you need dig in to find the source of your trouble. Tests aren’t specific enough? Or are you passing your tests, but finding a lot of bugs in QA?

It may take your team some time to get better at building the right tests, and reducing the bugs that show up in QA. But this will be crucial to increasing confidence level, where you’ll be ready to automate the whole pipeline. As you become more confident in your tests, then you’ll be confident to automatically deploy to production.

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5. Evaluate tools to help

Continuous deployment is a lot about process. Once you’ve gotten a handle on that, you’ll have a much better idea of what you want out of the tools. Amazon’s own CodePipeline is one possible build server you can use. Because it’s a service, it’s one less server you don’t have to manage. And of course Jenkins is a popular option. Even with Jenkins there is a service based offering from CloudBees. You might also take a look at CircleCI, & Travis which are newer service based offerings, which although they don’t have all the plugins & integrations of Jenkins, they’ve learned from bumps in the road, and improved the formula.

We like CircleCI because it’s open source, smaller footprint than Jenkins, integrates with Slack & Hipchat, and has Docker support as well.

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5 Things I just learned from James Turnbull about Docker

docker containers

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I just got my hands on a copy of James Turnbull’s new book The Docker Book. It’s an excellent introduction to Linux containers & the powerful things you can do with them. It’s 335 pages covering all the introductory topics to get you up and running and then more advanced topics like working with the docker API, building services & extending docker.

Here’s what I learned…

1. Containers aren’t new

The technology today we call containers in Unix is based on chroot mechanism which was introduced way back in the 80’s.

With traditional virtualization, we use a hypervisor layer, so we emulate hardware. The virtual machine running on top, can run anything, from Windows, to different flavors & versions of unix. It appears to be a completely separate piece of hardware.

With containers we move up to the operating system level, and we create isolation between users. These users all share the same parent operating system. This means it requires dramatically less overhead. That means speed!

Docker is an automation layer built on Lightweight Linux Containers or LXC. To applications it looks like they have their own machine, their own userspace, their own filesystem, their own network.

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2. No more VirtualBoxes

Are you tired of waiting for your VMs to spinup? Building dev & test environments becomes lightening fast with Docker. This accelerates software development, and makes a lot of things easier.

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3. Images, registries & containers

Images share some of the properties of images in hypervisor virtualization. However they are implemented with union file systems. While VirtualBox images take some time to boot, as the entire filesystem must be read & code executed anew, docker images are more like source code to the LXC subsystem.

Registries store your public and private images. The Docker Hub is one popular one. You can also host & deploy your own docker registry as your needs dictate.

Like VMs, containers can be started & stopped at will, albeit at lightening fast speed. They can also be deleted much as a VM can be.

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4. Lightning fast sandboxes

As we mentioned containers are fast. Did we mention really fast?

This can facilitate unit testing & continuous integration. A lot of shops are starting to use Jenkins for continuous integration, and fast testing is key to this process.

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5. They work with Vagrant

Are you already using Vagrant to automate deployment of virtual environments. If so the transition is easy. Here Docker becomes your provisioner.

Mark Stratmann put together a great how to, Implementing a Vagrant / Docker Dev environment which we’d recommend you take a look at. You can also head over to the Vagrant docs themselves.

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