Tag Archives: continuous deployment

Marching towards continuous deployment

cute code pipeline

If you’re like a lot of small dev teams & startups, you’ve dreamed of jumping on the continuous deployment train, but still aren’t quite there.

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You’ve got your code in some sort of repository. Now what? As it turns out the concepts aren’t terribly complicated. The hardest part is figuring out the process that works for your team.

1. Make a single script for deployment

Can you build easily? You want to take steps to simplify the build process & work towards everything being done from a single script. This might be an ant or maven script. It might be rake if you’re using ruby. Or it might be a makefile. Either way it organizes dependencies, checks your system & compiles things if necessary.

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2. Do nightly builds

If you’re currently doing manual builds, work towards doing them nightly. Once you have that under your belt you can actually schedule these to happen automatically every night. But you’re not there yet. You want to work to improve the build process first. Work on the performance of this process. Quality is also important. Is the build quality poor?

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3. Is your build process slow?

If it takes a long time to do the build, it takes a long time to get to the point where you can smoke test. You want to shorten this time, so you can iterate faster. Look at ways to improve the overall performance of the whole chain. What’s it getting stuck on?

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4. Is your build quality poor?

Your tests are going to verify application functionality, do security checks, performance or even compliance checks. If these are often failing, you need dig in to find the source of your trouble. Tests aren’t specific enough? Or are you passing your tests, but finding a lot of bugs in QA?

It may take your team some time to get better at building the right tests, and reducing the bugs that show up in QA. But this will be crucial to increasing confidence level, where you’ll be ready to automate the whole pipeline. As you become more confident in your tests, then you’ll be confident to automatically deploy to production.

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5. Evaluate tools to help

Continuous deployment is a lot about process. Once you’ve gotten a handle on that, you’ll have a much better idea of what you want out of the tools. Amazon’s own CodePipeline is one possible build server you can use. Because it’s a service, it’s one less server you don’t have to manage. And of course Jenkins is a popular option. Even with Jenkins there is a service based offering from CloudBees. You might also take a look at CircleCI, & Travis which are newer service based offerings, which although they don’t have all the plugins & integrations of Jenkins, they’ve learned from bumps in the road, and improved the formula.

We like CircleCI because it’s open source, smaller footprint than Jenkins, integrates with Slack & Hipchat, and has Docker support as well.

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