Tag Archives: configuration management

The New Commodity Hardware Craze aka Cloud Computing

Does anyone remember 15 years ago when the dot-com boom was just starting?  A lot of companies were running on Sun.  Sun was the best hardware you could buy for the price.  It was reliable and a lot of engineers had experience with the operating system, SunOS a flavor of Unix.

Yet suddenly companies were switching to cheap crappy hardware.  The stuff failed more often, had lower quality control, and cheaper and slower buses.  Despite all of that, cutting edge firms and startups were moving to commodity hardware in droves.  Why was it so? Continue reading The New Commodity Hardware Craze aka Cloud Computing

Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

In search of a good book on Chef itself, I picked up this new title on O’Reilly.  It’s one of their new format books, small in size, only 75 pages.

There was some very good material in this book.  Mr. Nelson-Smith’s writing style is good, readable, and informative.  The discussion of risks of infrastructure as code was instructive.  With the advent of APIs to build out virtual data centers, the idea of automating every aspect of systems administration, and building infrastructure itself as code is a new one.  So an honest discussion of the risks of such an approach is bold and much needed.  I also liked the introduction to Chef itself, and the discussion of installation.

Chef isn’t really the main focus of this book, unfortunately.  The book spends a lot of time introducing us to Agile Development, and specifically test driven development.  While these are lofty goals, and the first time I’ve seen treatment of the topic in relation to provisioning cloud infrastructure, I did feel too much time was spent on that.  Continue reading Review – Test Driven Infrastructure with Chef – Stephen Nelson-Smith

Devops – What is it and why is it important?

Devops is one of those fancy contractions that tech folks just love.  One part development or developer, and another part operations.  It imagines a blissful marriage where the team that develops software and builds features that fit the business, works closely and in concert with an operations and datacenter team that thinks more like developers themselves.

In the long tradition of technology companies, two separate cultures comprise these two roles.  Developers, focused on development languages, libraries, and functionality that match the business requirements keep their gaze firmly in that direction.  The servers, network and resources those components of software are consuming are left for the ops teams to think about.

So too, ops teams are squarely focused on uptime, resource consumption, performance, availability, and always-on.  They will be the ones worken up at 4am if something goes down, and are thus sensitive to version changes, unplanned or unmanaged deployments, and resource heavy or resource wasteful code and technologies.

Lastly there are the QA teams tasked with quality assurance, testing, and making sure the ongoing dearth of features don’t break anything previously working or introduce new show stoppers.

Devops is a new and I think growing area where the three teams work more closely together.  But devops also speaks to the emerging area of cloud deployments, where servers can be provisioned with command line api calls, and completely scripted.  In this new world, infrastructure components all become components in software, and thus infrastructure itself, long the domain of manual processes, and labor intensive tasks becomes repeatable, and amenable to the techniques of good software development.  Suddenly version control, configuration management, and agile development methodologies can be applied to operations, bringing a whole new level of professionalism to deployments.

Sean Hull asks on Quora – What is devops and why is it important?

Configuration Management – What is it and why is it important?

Every software service or component on a server requires configurations. In your desktop applications you set preferences for what your default page will be, how you’d like your margins set, or whether to save and restore cookies each time you restart.

Enterprise applications also require complex configuration settings.  Want to monitor a webserver and a database with Nagios, that’s set in the config file.  What to start MySQL with 8G of memory for InnoDB, that’s also set in a config file.  What’s more config files contain server specific settings, based on IP address, or the servers role, webserver or database for example.   The webserver may also have memcache and outbound email services running.

With more traditional deployments, the systems administrator will setup each physical box, and configure those services based on the business needs.  As you bring online 10’s or 100’s of servers, however, you can quickly see how labor intensive this process would be, and also how much redundancy there is.

Enter configuration management into the picture.  Previously I blogged about tools like Puppet that can bring great new best practices to the table. There is also cfengine, and the newer Chef which incorporates cloud deployments as well into the mix.  Configuration management allows you to remotely administer servers, install packages, manage dependencies, install configurations based on a central copy, and even define roles and templates for new servers.  This brings a whole new level of professionalism to deployments, and also newfound power and flexibility.

We’ll be writing more about configuration management, especially in the context of cloud deployments such as Amazon EC2 so please stay tuned.

Sean Hull asks on Quora – What is configuration management and why is it important?

Backups – What are they and why are they important?

Backups are obviously a crucial component in any enterprise application.  Modern internet components are prone to failure, and backups keep your bases covered.  Here’s what you should consider:

  1. Is your database backed up, including object structures, data, stored procedures, grants, and logins?
  2. Is your webserver doc-root backed up?
  3. Is your application source code in version control and backed up?
  4. Are your server configurations backed up?  Relevant config files might include those for apache, mysql, memcache, php, email (postfix or qmail), tomcat, Java solr or any other software your application requires.
  5. Are your cron or supporting scripts and jobs backed up?
  6. Have you tested all of these components and your overall documentation with a fire drill?  This is the proof that you’ve really covered all the angles.

If you do your backups right, you should be able to restore without a problem.

Sean Hull asks on Quora – What are backups and why are they important?