Tag Archives: communication

What Deborah Tannen taught me about conversation & interruption

tannen you just dont understand

I was recently invited to attend a charity event in Washington DC. Dinner was a catered affair of 300 with a few senators & Muhammad Yunus there to talk about micro financing.

After dinner we broke up into some smaller groups, and had great conversations into the night. It was interesting to me as I don’t often rub elbows with lobbyists & political animals. While we were all talking, the subject of language came up, and in particular how different people’s styles affect how they come off.

Join 30,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I became really engaged, as this topic has always interested me. I was introduced to the ideas of Deborah Tannen. She’s a professor of linguistics from Georgetown University, and an expert on the topic.

Afterward, I went straight to my kindle & bought here seminal book “You Just Don’t Understand”.

Boy do I understand a lot more now.

1. Conversational style varies by culture & gender

Across cultures, from europeans to Asians, North to South Americans, conversational styles vary. Some pause longer between breathes, while others make briefer pauses. Some deem conversation more like judge & jury, where each should be afforded carefully the chance to take stage, while others prefer the casual chance to jump in, and constant overlap.

These differences lead to the sense of pushiness versus interest, interruption versus dominance. Interest versus boredom. Since all these cultures have a different style, it can get rather complicated interpreting someone’s intentions if you’re not from that culture.

What’s more these vary quite a bit between men & women.

Also: What I learned from Jay Heinrichs about click worthy blog titles

2. Report & rapport talk are different

Report talk is in public, perhaps at a lecture, or out with a large group of friends around the dinner table. There stories & conversation revolves around a larger group.

Rapport talk on the other hand is at home, among intimates.

She says that women tend to prefer the latter while men prefer the former. So in different circumstances it can appear that one or the other has “nothing to say”, when it actually revolves around their preferences of when to speak.

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Like & respect

Women’s behavior & style of speaking is rooted in the goal of being liked. So there are many cases where they may downplay themselves, to reach a more equal state with those around them.

Men’s behavior & conversational style is based around seeking respect. This can often mean emphasizing differences, and not parity.

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Contest or connection?

Men often see the world through the lens of contest, especially in relationships with others. Women on the other hand tend to see it as an interconnected network. By building bonds you strengthen that network.

These two styles inform dramatically different behaviors in similar situations.

Also: Is Reid Hoffman right about career risk?

5. Interest or independence

Here’s another example of how men & women may see things differently.


When men change the subject, women think they are showing a lack of sympathy — a failure of intimacy. But the failure to ask probing questions could just as well be a way of respecting the other’s need for independence.

So it seems styles & priorities inform intention & interpretation of a lot in conversations.

Although all of this doesn’t resolve or put to rest these differences, being informed can certainly help a lot towards understanding.

Also: What I learned from the 37 Signals team about work & startups

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

Do we need another book on communicating?

supercommunicator

Join 28,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

I had to ask the question. There are so many books on communicating & presenting affectively, it begs the question, what can this book do that others haven’t?

While it’s a fair question, I don’t necessarily think it stands with peers. That said it’s a new book, with a new tone, preaching many of the best advice and doing it with a flair. If you’ve read a ton of communication books, you may not find something new, but if the topic is one you’re just digging into, Pietrucha is a great place to start.

1. Jobs vs Gates – inspired presentations

If you’ve ever seen these two companies CEO’s do new product demos, you’ll immediately get it. You don’t have to be an apple fanboy to appreciate how Jobs presents without buzzwords, and cuts to the heart of our hearts.

That means don’t get mired in jargon, speak to our passions, and be your own ambassador.

Also: Do managers underestimate operational costs?

2. Lead with a story & a question

In a recent discussion with a prospect I was asked about one experience that stood out over the years of consulting.

One popped into my head of a dot-com startup in the late 90’s. The company was trying to close an acquisition deal, but the web application was sick & feverish. My first few days involved conversations with lead engineers, DBA & operations team members. As I turn over more stones, I found a key component, the database, misconfigured. I sifted through configurations, and found the setup lacking. The server was using only 5% of memory. Some of the settings were even still at their default. Changing the right ones allowed the machine to flex it’s muscles like a marathon runner taken off a starvation diet. Things improved very quickly, and the site returned to a snappy responsive self.

The CEO beamed with approval, and just a few weeks later the firm was purchased for over 80 million dollars. Not bad work if you can get it. 🙂

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

3. Drop the vernacular & speak broadly

After recently doing some writing for muckrack on how to reach pitch journalists and then at Infoworld getting started with Amazon EC2. I’ve learned a ton. Having a professional editor explain what they want really puts things in perspective.

Editors will start by talking about their audience. If you’re a blogger, do you know who your audience is, and what they really get from your site? There may be many answers. Once you get your audience, how can you speak to all of them? In my case, I have readers who are programmers & devops, then I have CEO’s & VCs. But it doesn’t stop there. What about recruiters, and hiring managers? How about random internet searchers, and students?

All of these folks can get something from my site, and using broad language allows everyone to be within reach. Don’t sacrifice depth, but use language and stories to make your point.

Check this: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

4. Analogies that resonate

I attend a lot of mini conferences, meetups, drinkups & social events in nyc. I find it’s one of the keys to success in consulting.

In an endless sea of conversations, you will find yourself talking about what your day-to-day business is all about. In my early years in nyc, these conversations would consist of technically correct descriptions, followed by glazed eyes, and a quick change of subject. After this happens often enough you start to wonder, how can I share such a technical description to a broader audience?

Truth is it’s only technical because you know so much about it. If I stand back I might say I’m “a sort of specialized surgeon for the internet”, or “a traffic cop of sorts, for the information highway we all share”, or better yet “a plumber, that you call when your pipes are backed up and your customers are screaming”.

Whichever analogy I use, I see eyes light up, and a look of understanding. “Oh I can see how that would be an important specialization”. Indeed.

The right analogy makes all the difference!

Related: Are startup CEO’s hiding their scalability problems?

5. Put your words on the chopping block

If you haven’t already done so, start chopping. Sentences & paragraphs all benefit from shortening & edit. Distill your big ideas in summary and let the story lend the detail. Your audience will pay closer attention, and see the big picture you are trying to share.

The guys at 37 signals do this eloquently in RE:Work .

Read this: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

Get more. Grab our exclusive monthly Scalable Startups. We share tips and special content. Our latest Why I don’t work with recruiters

When You Have to Take the Fall

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

One of the biggest jobs in operations is monitoring. There are so many servers, databases, webservers, search servers, backup servers. Each has lots of moving parts, lots that can go wrong. Typically if you have monitoring, and react to that monitoring, you’ll head off bigger problems later.

A problem is brewing

We, myself & the operations team started receiving alerts for one server. Space was filling up. Anyone can relate to this problem. You fill up your dropbox, or the drive on your laptop and all sorts of problems will quickly bubble to the surface.

Also check out – Why generalists are better at scaling the web.

As we investigated over the coming days, a complicated chain of processes and backups were using space on this server. Space that didn’t belong to them.

Dinner boils over

What happened next was inevitable. The weekly batch jobs kicked off and failed for lack of space. Those processes were not being monitored. Business units then discovered missing data in their reports and a firestorm of emails ensued.

Hiring? Get our MySQL DBA Interview Guide for managers, recruiters and candidates alike.

Why weren’t these services being monitored, they wanted to know.

Time to shoot the messenger

Having recently seen a changing of the guard, and a couple of key positions left vacant, it was clear that the root problem was communication.

Looking for talent? Why is it so hard to find a mythical MySQL DBA or devops expert these days?

I followed up the group emails, explaining in polite tone that we do in fact have monitoring in place, but that it seemed a clear chain of command was missing, and this process fell through the cracks.

I quickly received a response from the CTO requesting that I not send “these types of emails” to the team and to direct issues directly to him.

You might also like: A CTO Must Never Do This

A consultants job

As the sands continued to shift, a lead architect did emerge, one who took ownership of the products overall. Acting as a sort of life guard with a higher perch from which to watch, we were able to escalate important issues & he would then prioritize the team accordingly.

Are you a startup grappling with scalability? Keep in mind these 5 things toxic to scalability

Sometimes things have to break a little first.

What’s more a consultants job isn’t necessarily to lead the pack, nor to force management to act. A consultant’s job is to provide the best advice possible & to raise issues to the decision makers. And yes sometimes it means being a bit of a fall guy.

Those are the breaks of the game.

Want more? Grab our Scalable Startups monthly for more tips and special content. Here’s a sample

When You're Hired to Solve a People Problem

Also find Sean Hull’s ramblings on twitter @hullsean.

A good five years ago I worked for a firm in online education. Among various products they provided through their website, they were struggling with a process to get content churned out more quickly. The bottleneck was slowing down their business, and limiting the new products they could offer.

Help Us Publish, Please…

Among a number of things I was asked to look at, one particularly vexing problem surrounded publishing. Adding new products had become a cumbersome & difficult process. It took days sometimes weeks. For obvious reasons the stake holders wanted to wrestle this process out of the hands of engineering, and place it were it arguably belonged in the hands of the business units.

[quote]
When you’re hired to solve specific technical problems it only figures that you go looking for software solutions. But sometimes the problems turn out to involve the people and processes of an organization. Getting them unstuck is one of the biggest challenges an professional services consultant can face. But it is also one of the most rewarding to solve.
[/quote]

Bumping into Fear, Uncertainty & Doubt

As I dug into the meat of the problem I began to work closely with the database administrator. He was a very smart gentleman & friendly in his own way. But he also spoke with a very thick accent and brusqueness about his manner that proved difficult at times. After working together for some awhile, however I began to win him over, and he started to trust me.

Looking for a top-flight database administrator? Here’s our interview guide for recruiters, managers and candidates alike

It became apparent that he was rather resistant to handing over the keys to the publish process to non-technical folks in other departments. Having handled his share of outages, and bungling screw ups, which sometimes fall on operations during some of the least hospitable hours on the dial, I could understand his concern. What’s more he knew the code which had grown unwieldy.

If I were to use a polite euphemism I would call it spaghetti code.

Management, Managers & Trouble Brewing

Around then the CTO decided to send a manager to sniff around. Unfortunately the manager in question was a very hands off type. His edict was simply to get this done in two weeks, and proceeded to go on vacation. Upon his return when things were still hitting snags, things started to go south.

Despite AWS failures firms like AirBNB and Reddit didn’t have to go down.

Though some of the process had been automated, I refused to move the changes into full push-button automation without first testing on dev environments. Of course those requests had fallen on deaf ears.

Problem comes to a head

Next the hands off manager escalated things upstream, of course adding his own spin on the situation. Shortly thereafter I’m called into the CTOs office only to get royally chewed out. A serious smack down which I’ll admit came almost out of nowhere.

A related article which readers also found quite popular: A CTO Must Never Do This

Oh, honestly I’m not complaining. On some level this is the job of the consultant. To act as the third party, wise or unbiased second opinion, and even punching bag at times.

Once things calmed down, I explained the situation from top to bottom. Yes there was messy code, and yes the process was complex, but it could of course be automated. What really stood in the way was a very resistant engineer who currently owned the process.

As much of the Sandy recovery continues, Devops can learn real lessons from the hurricane.

The CTO for his part concurred, having had trouble communicating with the engineer himself, and really not liking him much. He then appointed a proper project manager to oversee redoing the publish process from scratch.

A Plea for Cooperation

If I were to do it all again, for my part I’d sniff out the people dynamics more carefully. It’s often the case the companies have the engineering talent in house to solve a particular problem, but not the will or knowledge to put it into play.

Is your business growing? Having trouble scaling? Here’s how we do a performance review. It’s the first step on your way to hyper growth.

To managers & CTOs I’d encourage where possible to look for people, process and communication issues. Try to ferret out when something is an engineering problem, or whether it is one of people, silos and territory.

Want more? Grab our Scalable Startups monthly for more tips and special content. Here’s a sample

You're Too Young To Be My Boss

About a year ago I engaged with a firm to do some operations work on their site. They provided services to colleges and universities.

When they first reached out to me, they were rather quick to respond to my proposal. They seemed to think the quote was very reasonable. I also did some due diligence of my own, checking the guy’s profile on the about page. I noticed he was 25, rather young, but I didn’t think much else of it.

We discussed whether they wanted fixed hours. Since those would limit my availability we both agreed a more flexible approach made sense. This worked well for me as I tend to shift and schedule time liberally, so I can be efficient & flexible with clients, but still have a life too.

Trouble Brewing

As we began to interact the first week, I sensed something amiss. My thought was that the first week you work with a client, they feel you out. They see how you work, when you work, how much gets done and so forth. This provides a benchmark with which to measure you. If either party is unhappy with how things are going, they discuss and make adjustments accordingly.

What was happening in this case was the guy started pestering me. I began to get incessant messages on instant messenger asking for updates. I had none. I explained that I would contact him as things were completed, or if I had questions.

This was only two days into the project. I’d barely gained access to the servers!

The Fever Pitch

After discussing my concerns on the phone, the gentleman kind of glossed them over. From there the pestering continued. I explained that I could not be available to him any hour of the day, while the engagement only provided for one half of a week. This began to interrupt me from other client work, so I had to signoff of instant messenger. Not good.

The Pot Boils Over

We spoke again on Monday briefly, and decided to connect the following day. From there the pestering began anew, and I began to lose my patience. I insisted that we speak on the phone before work would continue. I felt the problem was deteriorating and discussing over text would only make things worse.

He emailed me back as I was then offline. In his email he ordered me to come online. While he sat in a meeting, he explained, he could not take a call! Nevertheless he insisted we resolve it during the meeting. Distracted no less.

[quote]It was then that I started receiving text messages on my personal mobile phone from the guy, pestering me to get online so we could resolve our communication problem! You can’t make this stuff up![/quote]

The Fallout

Eventually we did both get on the phone, and I explained I had reached wits end. After only ten short days of working together, we had both set strong precedents and they were obviously not compatible. He asked if I would stay on longer, and reconsider working together, and I said I would think about it.

I chose not to dig a deeper hole, and let him know I wouldn’t be invoicing for previous the weeks work.

The Lessons

o beware age differences – in our case an 18 year gap
o pay attention to management styles – self-starters don’t need micromanaging
o be patient & keep communicating
o allow for an exit strategy that is amenable to both parties

Read this far? You’ll love our newsletter. Get Scalable Startups. No Spam. No Selling..

Consulting essentials: Managing & Completing Engagements

This is the second in a series of three articles on Consulting Essentials.
Read the previous post, Consulting essentials: Getting the business

Communicating well and knowing when to step in or stand back is the linchpin of successful consulting.
Some people have natural charm. If you’re one of these people you’ll find consulting is definitely for you. You’ll use that skill all the time as each new client brings a half dozen or a dozen new people to interact with.

If it doesn’t come easily, practice practice practice. Try to get out of your own head space, and hear what troubles your client, and what big business challenges worry them.

Be ready to help but don’t try to be the hero


A decade ago I worked for an Internet startup. They were having serious performance problems which was slowing down the site, and turning users away. When digging into the systems I found serious security issues besides the performance ones, and got distracted trying to wrap up those lest someone break in and destroy or steal their business assets. Communicating the situation to the client, they looked aghast. After explaining the situation to them, they understood the risks and explained that the current priorities were to get users back online.

The technical problems I saw may not have been aligned with the business priorities. Your job is to make your client happy. Provide your professional opinion and advice whenever and wherever your skills come into play, but let them run their own business.

If you’re focusing on one area, and you discover other problems or things that may need resolving going forward, bring this to the attention of the client. Allow them to prioritize for themselves. It’s their business not yours. Your job is to give your professional opinion, raise concerns that you see, but most importantly solve problems they want you to solve.

Project Your Personality

Smile a lot and listen to people. Make sure you’re talking less than half the time. When you first engage with a client, they should be speaking more like two-thirds of the time. You want to get in the habit of listening, and stepping in your clients shoes. You want to understand their pain, their business concerns and how to satisfy them.

Manage Time Efficiently

Get things done. Everybody talks about it, but not everyone does it. I personally avoid all the faddish tools for this, and use a simple checklist. Focus on the task at hand. Give yourself a doable list of tasks each day, and check them off as you go. Try hard to avoid working on things not on that list. The last point relates back to the principle of solving only the problems that you’ve been asked to solve.

Communicate Successes & Progress

In many engagements you’ll come upon struggles and get blocked by situations that seem intransigent. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to communicate with the client during these situations. Don’t get stuck thinking it will make you look weak. Communicating with the client has a number of surprising advantages.

For one sometimes they’ll have a solution, such as a different angle on the business problem, or insight and details that just simplify the problem you think you thought needed to be solved.

Second, it allows the client to adjust schedules in advance if something will take a little longer. You’d be surprised how often a client will sympathize with a difficult problem.

Lastly, involving the client intimately allows them to enjoy the triumph when you solve the problem. This helps morale, communicates more about what it is you do day-to-day and how you work through a problem. And overall it helps them appreciate the intrinsic value you’re providing.

Don't be that guy–Social tips for geeks

Sheldon CooperAs a tech consultant one of the most interesting parts of the job is being able to observe human relations at work. I’ve learned through the years that because tech people and non-tech people speak different ‘languages’, bridging the communication gap is a critical part of my role as a consultant.

Sometimes the relationship between tech and other business units is less sweet. The typical complaints are that IT guys are always denying requests, aloof and even downright unhelpful.

On the other side, the geeks feel frustrated that people “just don’t listen”. We remind people to always use strong passwords, and people still make “password” their password. We train end-users and give specific guidance and instructions but they still commit the fundamental mistakes. Meanwhile, the managers expect IT staff to perform miracles.

So who can be blamed when this animosity exists? Geeks for their arrogance? Or end-users for not making an effort to improve their understanding of tech concepts? Perhaps both sides can share the blame. But as tech folks we can try to make things better by working on our communication skills. Sliding into aloofness will not only make people resentful but suspicious of our motives too. Don’t be that guy!

If you’ve found yourself slipping up in the people-skills department, here are a few tips that can help you along. Think of understanding and persuading other people as a puzzle equally complex as the biggest engineering challenge. In that light you can look at it as an ongoing project to improve your communication and charm.

  1. Please Speak My Language
  2. Martha Stewart said “the biggest mistake people make is they expect that others know stuff…”. Amen Martha. In my experience a lot of folks fall into this category. Ever been at a meeting where financial folks are waxing on about the business bottom line, margins, and shareholder value? If talk of capex, opex and other financial terms confound you, then you know the feeling. So why subject others to this when we talk tech? There’s no reason to, and people will love you for using a language that everyone can understand. Use analogies and stories to emphasize an idea or point so it resonates with your audience.

  3. Listen to me
  4. Everyone wants to be listened to; hopefully that’s obvious. But sometimes we get stuck on our own ideas, and focus more on people hearing us. It may sound counterintuitive, but psychologically speaking, listening more to the other person makes them listen to your ideas more. Start by giving plenty of time to speak, and try to repeat the other persons ideas in your own words. You’ll set the tone for a more reasoned dialogue and find your own thoughts heard more too.

  5. Be more positive
  6. Perhaps it is our engineering backgrounds, and the discipline that the scientific method ingrains in us. You may think that being critical is a common way to approach a discussion on issues. However this may come across as negative and stand-offish depending on how you communicate. What’s more if your audience doesn’t see things from your perspective, you may find yourself complaining and condemning proposals.

    Better to find the positive as a common starting point. Speak about all the things that work well first, before working your way around to points of difference.

  7. Speak slowly
  8. Psychologists have found that people sense more confidence and listen more to people who speak slowly. It may seem counterintuitive, after all if you speak quicker, you may be able to get that complicated idea out into the world before you are ever interrupted! What’s more speaking slowly allows you to think about what might come next, anticipating reactions, or even changing direction slightly in mid-stream. It also allows you more time to catch what might be a … or a slip of the tongue.

  9. A few more ideas to chew on…
    1. Smile more
    2. You may not be aware of how often you’re smiling or not. What’s more you may think it insincere to try to smile. But a frown, or other negative face can criticize your audience as much as actual words can. And it can set people off on the wrong foot, so they won’t listen to you either. Better to stay positive, and convey that with a smile.

    3. Remember & use people’s names
    4. People love to hear their own names. Remembering and using someone’s name improves the chances that they will listen to you and your ideas.

    5. Repeat what others say in your own words
    6. This one is really crucial. By repeating someone’s ideas in your own words you do a few things all at once. First you improve communication, as it is so often the case that we misunderstand someone else’s ideas, repeating them in your own words allows them to hear how you’ve digested their point, and allows them to comment or adjust if you missed something. It also shows them you are really listening. If you’re going to critique someone, and they feel you didn’t really get their idea, they’ll be very unlikely to listen.

    7. Try not to say “you’re wrong”
    8. Even in the cases where the other person is completely wrong, this statement may not have the intended affect. It may simple cause them to wall off and not listen to you. Better to point out the sides of what they are saying that you can agree with first, then come around to some differences.

    9. Read Dale Carnegie
    10. The classic book “How to Win Friends & Influence People” should really be required reading for the geek set. Being personable and charming may not be natural to all of us, but a lot of it can be learned with practice. Dale Carnegie has written a sort of bible on the topic, and it’s definitely worth a read.

iHeavy Insights 82 – Better Practices

Best Practices, the term we hear thrown around a lot.  But like going on that new years diet, too often ends up more talk than action.

Manage Processes

Operator error ie typing the wrong command is always a risk.  Logging into the wrong server to drop a database or typing the dump command such that you dump data into the database, these are risks that operations folks face everyday.

Accountability is important, be sure all of your systems folks login to their own accounts.  Apply the least privileges model, give permissions on an as needed basis.

Set prompts with big bold names that indicate production servers and their purpose.  Automate repetitive commands that are prone to typos.

Don’t be afraid to give developers read-only accounts on production servers.

Communicate Clearly

Regular team meetings, a la the Agile stand ups are a great way to encourage folks to communicate.  Bring the developers and operations folks together.   Ask everyone in turn to voice their current todos, their concerns and risks they see.  Encourage everyone to listen with an open mind.  Consider different perspectives.

Communication is a cultural attribute.  So it comes from the top.  Encourage this as a CTO or CIO by asking questions, communicating your concerns, repeat your own requests in different words and paraphrase.  Listen to what your team is saying, repeat and rephrase those concerns, and how and when they will be addressed.

Document Processes

A culture of documenting services, and processes is healthy.  It provides a central location and knowledge base for the team.  It also prevents sliding into the situation where only one team member understands how to administer critical business components.  Were that person to be unavailable or to leave the company, you’re stuck reverse engineering your infrastructure and guessing at architectural decisions.

Better Practices

Rather than think of best practices as something you need to achieve today, think of it as an ongoing day-to-day quest for improvement.

  • repetitive manual processes – employ automation & script those processes where possible.
  • where steps require investigation and research – document it
  • where production changes are involved – communicate with business units, qa & operations
  • always be improving – striving for better practices

iHeavy Insights 77 – What Consultants Do

 

What Do Consultants Do?

Consultants bring a whole host of tools to experiences to bear on solving your business problems.  They can fill a need quickly, look in the right places, reframe the problem, communicate and get teams working together, and bring to light problems on the horizon. And they tell stories of challenges they faced at other businesses, and how they solved them.

Frame or Reframe The Problem

Oftentimes businesses see the symptoms of a larger problem, but not the cause.  Perhaps their website is sluggish at key times, causing them to lose customers.  Or perhaps it is locking up inexplicably.  Framing the problem may involve identifying the bottleneck and pointing to a particular misconfigured option in the database or webserver.  Or it may mean looking at the technical problem you’ve chosen to solve and asking if it meets or exceeds what the business needs.

Tell Business Stories

Clients often have a collection of technologies and components in place to meet their business needs.  But day-to-day running of a business is ultimately about bringing a product or service to your customer.  Telling stories of challenges and solutions of past customers, helps illustrate, educate, and communicate problems you’re facing today.

Fill A Need Quickly

If you have an urgent problem, and your current staff is over extended, bringing in a consultant to solve a specific problem can be a net gain for everyone.  They get up to speed quickly, bring fresh perspectives, and review your current processes and operations.  What’s more they can be used in a surgical way, to augment your team for a short stint.

Get Teams Communicating

I’ve worked at quite a number of firms over the years and tasked with solving a specific technical problem only to find the problem was a people problem to begin with.  In some cases the firm already has the knowledge and expertise to solve a problem, but some members are blocking.  This can be because some folks feel threatened by a new solution which will take away responsibilities they formerly held.  Or it can be because they feel some solution will create new problems which they will then be responsible to cleanup.  In either case bridging the gap between business needs and operations teams to solve those needs can mean communicating to each team in ways that make sense to them.  A technical detail oriented focus makes most sense when working with the engineering teams, business and bottom-line focused when communicating with the management team.

Highlight Or Bring To Light Problems On Horizon

Is our infrastructure a ticking timebomb?  Perhaps our backups haven’t been tested and are missing some crucial component?  Or we’ve missed some security consideration, left some password unset, left the proverbial gate open to the castle.  When you deal with your operations on a day-to-day basis, little details can be easy to miss.  A fresh perspective can bring needed insight.

BOOK REVIEW – Jaron Lanier – You Are Not a Gadget

Lanier is a programmer, musician, the father of VR way back in the 90’s, and wide-ranging thinker on topics in computing and the internet.

His new book is a great, if at times meandering read on technology, programming, schizophrenia, inflexible design decisions, marxism, finance transformed by cloud, obscurity & security, logical positivism, strange loops and more.

He opposes the thinking-du-jour among computer scientists, leaning in a more humanist direction summed up here:  “I believe humans are the result of billions of years of implicit, evolutionary study in the school of hard knocks.”    The book is worth a look.