Tag Archives: change

Is there a devops talent gap?

jenkins_docker

New programming languages & services are being invented at a staggering pace. Hosting is changing, networking is changing, race to market is quickening.

But what does all of this mean to the search for talent? Who understands all these components? Who is an expert in any one?

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1. That new car smell

We all remember that time. You know when you drove out of the dealership with your brand new wheels. Driving down the road, you feel on top of the world. You start dreaming of all the fun times you’ll have in your new car. For days and weeks afterward you walk out to your car, open the door & sit inside. It all feels special. You kind of hang out there for a few minutes enjoying the smell before you drive off. Right?

Let’s be vigilant to remember the same thing happens, or rather is happeing in technology all the time. As we automate our infrastructures with Ansible, Puppet & Chef, deploy continuous integration with Jenkins, Travis or Codeship, we should give pause. Each of these tools has it’s own syntax, it’s own bugs, it’s own community, it’s own speed of development & change, it’s own life.

Also: Does a four letter word divide dev & ops?

2. A lot of rushing

Google tells me the synonyms of agile are, nimble, lithe, supple & acrobatic. So in a fast moving world it’s no wonder agile is so big. Anything that allows us to respond to customers quicker & evolve our product faster is a good thing. Yes it is.

Over the years I’ve worked with a lot of clients & customers. Some right out of the gates are in a hurry. There is a sense of urgency even from the initial meeting. Although not in every case, sometimes these are the sign of the perpetually late. They end up throwing money around, throwing technology around, and all in a desperate attempt to plug a leaking ship.

In our race to automate & remain agile & nimble, we should also consider the future. Lets attempt to find a balance & consider future implications of technology decisions & choices.

Read: Is automation killing old-school operations?

3. Hosting, what’s that?

For many of the startups I work with today, they’ve never deployed on anything but Amazon. There was no rack of computers in a closet & a T1 line, circa 1997. There was no rackspace hosted servers or a colo in New Jersey circa 2005. Right from the beginning it was all on-demand computing.

This shift has surely brought a lot of benefit. But no one can argue it isn’t still very new. And with newness there is a learning curve. And bugs & surprises.

Related: Does a devop need to practice the art of resistance?

4. More complexity in troubleshooting

The wild ride really begins when you’re troubleshooting performance problems. Running your database on RDS you say? How the heck do I get to the terminal and run “top”? Can I do an iostat?

And what does iostat output really mean in multi-tenant Amazon, where your disk is an EBS volume across an unknown & unfriendly network. Who knows why it just slowed to a crawl, then sped up dramatically a few minutes later.

Even fetching the relevant logfile can be complicated. For all the problems the cloud eliminates, it sure introduces a few of it’s own. And who is the expert, and how to find them?

Read this: When fat fingers take down your database

5. More tech, fewer experts

I asked the question a few weeks back Do todays startups require assembly of a lot of parts that no one really understands?.

I’ve taken to browsing the stacks at the lovely StackShare site lately. There you can see what some of the top startups are using for their technology stacks. Docker, Yammer, Yelp, Stripe, Vine, Spotify & Stack Overflow are all there today.

There are new message queues like NSQ & programming languages like Markdown, Coffeescript & Clojure. Even Java. Are people still building web apps in Java. No please no!

While it’s wonderful to see such an explosion of innovation, I look at this from an operations perspective. In five years, when the first & second wave of developers at your startup have left, picture yourself trying to find talent in a long since out-of-fashion language like Dart or Swift. What’s more how do you untangle the mess you’ve now built?

Check this: Is the SQL database dead?

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