Category Archives: Startups

Why I didn’t go postal at the postal service

I’ve had a mailbox with the postal service for over a decade. It’s been great. It’s a convenient address for a business, and it doesn’t change. Great for receiving bills, tax refunds, contracts, pay checks and everything else.

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I picked the postal service years back because I figured they are solid. A corner deli or other mailbox service might go out of business. And the idea was to have a box that doesn’t have to change often.

In all those years I’ve always been timely with paying the rent, which can be every six months or twelve months as you choose. Recently I mixed up the renewal. When I went in to pickup my mail, the lock had been changed. I went to the customer service counter to ask about it. Amanda came to help me. She was cordial.

She explained however that the box had been closed. Since it was the day before the holiday, she wouldn’t be able to help with this, and suggested I come back on Monday.

As I like to be agreeable, I agreed to this request. In the meantime she was able to give me my mail. It was nice to see they had been keeping it. After all I was only a few weeks overdue.

Bring me the documents!

On Monday I had planned to return right away. But as my day got going I wondered if I would have enough time. This probably won’t be just a quick stop in. For some reason I sensed the process would be complicated.

Tuesday I set my alarm clock to wake up two hours early. I got dressed & headed straight to the post office. I wanted to get an early start. I went to the customer service desk again, and met Michael. I explained the mixup. Yes I was late playing my rent. Could I pay a penalty of some kind and then renew for another year?

“No I’m sorry, your box is closed now. You’ll have to reopen it.”, he explained.

“That’s no trouble let’s do that. What do we need to do?”, I asked.

“Well, you’ll need to bring all the documents that you opened the box with originally. Driver’s license, second form of ID, and the business document.”, Michael explained.

“Sure I said. I have my driver’s license right here. I can bring the business certificate. Great. And second form of ID?”, I asked.

“A passport would work.”

“That’ll be fine.”, I said. “So if I bring the business certificate & passport, and my driver’s license here, we’ll be able to open the box up again.”, I asked.

“Yes. If you’re able to bring those today or tomorrow, since nobody has opened another box, you can get that same box number again.”

“Wonderful. Thank you. :)”

Related: Is Amazon about to disrupt your data warehouse?

The endless lunchtime

From there I took another train trip home. The passport was easy enough to find. However the business certificate I had misplaced. It took me quite a while rifling through folders, but eventually I found it. Great I thought, I’ll just return to the post office, and have this task done for the day!

One thought occurred to me, I wonder if they might need a proof of address. He didn’t mention it, but I’ll just bring a recent gas bill just in case. Little did I know what would follow…

As I returned to the post office, Amanda greeted me. Hi there. Yes, I remember you from last week she said. Thx! Michael is at lunch now. He will be back in ten minutes.

So I waited. And waited. Twenty minutes go by. I go back to the counter, and Amanda says she’s not sure where he is, but she is going to lunch now too. When you see him return, just buzz the bell and he can help you.

Another twenty minutes go by and I see Michael return. I buzz the door, and he comes out.

Hi there Michael. I’ve managed to track down the documents you asked for, and I’ve got them all right here. Hopefully everything looks right and we can get this taken care of.

He asks me to fill out another form. On it includes my current address. Which has changed & is different from the original business address. Now I had thought to just write the same address down, as that might “simplify” things. But then I thought, that’s probably not prudent. Better to be honest. Right? I mean honesty is rewarded eh?

He sees the address & explains, I’m sorry but you’ll need a proof of address.

“Umm. Yes of course. I was careful to be very attentive to your requests earlier. Did I understand you correctly that you needed two items, the passport & business certificate.”, I asked?

“Yes but I didn’t see that you didn’t have your address here. You’ll need that too”

“No problem sir. Although it isn’t something we discussed, I did also bring my gas bill, because I thought that might be helpful here.”

“No we don’t accept that. Don’t you have a lease? Do you rent an apartment? You’ll need to bring me the right documentation!”

At this point it really does feel like a scene out of Terry Gilliam’s famous 1985 classic Brazil, where beaurocrat’s control your life. We must have form 27b-6 or else!

Related: How I use terraform & composer to automate wordpress on AWS

Customer thine enemy

At this point I’m getting internally quite furious. It is now my third trip to the post office, and still I don’t have the right forms. Remember I’ve also been a customer for over ten years! But that seems to have no bearing. What’s more I have all the documents required, even a proof of address, but it is the wrong one!

My agitation is increasing, and I’m kind of shaking with frustration. I want to scream or yell at this point. But I realize that will only make things worse.

“With all do respect sir, I’ve returned here three times already. It’s quite a trip back and forth. I’ve brought the documents you requested. “, I explain

It seems his tension is rising too. I don’t know if this is the usual day but he is not bending.

“I’ve explained what you need to do. That’s it!”

“Can you please explain to me again sir.”, I ask

“One more question. That’s all I’ll take from you!”, he says holding up his finger menacingly to me.

“How do I know if I return with one more document, we won’t get further through this process and find something else missing. Then I may have to return again.”

I am despondent at this point. Close to giving up. I have less confidence now that I’ve had throughout. I think he sees my pain at this point. I’m practically crawling on the ground beaten. That must have been enough for pity.

“Well you could talk to Miss Adams. Maybe she can help you.”, he says

“Yes miss Adams you say? Sure let’s talk to miss Adams.”

Related: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

The magical Miss Adams

I go around to the main post office and ask after Miss Adams. I meet Kelly at the front desk. She explains that miss Adams is at lunch, and will be back soon. But asks what is the problem.

I explain my mixup. About paying the rent late, and how the box must be reopen. I further explain that I’ve returned three times and show her the documents I have. She says they look fine, what’s the problem. Michael explained that a National Grid bill is not sufficient proof of address.

“Why not”, she asks?

It is at this point I have a revelation. There is no rhyme or reason to any of this madness. There may be a rule, it may or may not be followed. Depending on the day, the moon, the alignment of planets. Who knows.

“I’m sure that should be fine. Let’s ask miss Adams”, she says.

And then as if by magic, Miss Adams materializes out of nowhere. After such a trial, I imagine I felt much like fraternity pleges feel as they’ve been beaten and abused for days. Miss Adams is like a saint arriving from the heavens.

“Michael doesn’t take the gas bill as proof of address? Well I do.”, she says.

And with one simple wave of the wand, everything is resolved. Just like that.

Related: Is Amazon about to disrupt your data warehouse?

Innovation, Customers First & Startups

When I think of this experience, yes I’m frustrated as anyone would be.

But it also really stands out for me in stark contrast. For I have worked with innovation, entrepreneurs & startups for many years. We all approach business from the perspective of solving problems. There understanding your customers, helping them, and simplifying processes is the rule of the day.

When I think of a government agency like the Post Office, I think of FedEx. Their market cap is 60 billion dollars. They exist with the sole purpose of moving packages. Customers will pay an incredible amount of money to avoid every having to deal with the post office.

This is a testament to innovation. And to startups. It’s why I’ve enjoyed working in the startup space all these years. The hard work & the creative problem solving. I live for that.

Related: How do I migrate my skills to the cloud?

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Key lessons from the Devops Handbook

I picked up a copy of the DevOps Handbook.

This is not a book about how to setup Amazon servers, how to use git, codePipeline or Jenkins. It’s not about Chef or Ansible or other tools.

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This is a book about processes & people. It’s about how & why automation & world-class infrastructure will make your business more agile, raise quality & increase productivity.

1. Infrastructure in version control

With technologies like Terraform and CloudFormation, the entire state of your infrastructure can be captured. That means you can manage it just like any other code.

Also: Myth of five nines – Why high availability is overrated

2. Pushbutton builds

You’ve heard it before. Automate your builds. That means putting everything in version control, from environment building scripts, to configs, artifacts & reference data. Once you can do that, you’re on your way to automating production deploys completely.

Related: 5 ways to move data to amazon redshift

3. Devs & Ops comingled

In the devops world, devs should learn about operations, infrastructure, performance & more. What’s more operations teams should work closely with devs.

Read: Why were dev & ops siloed job roles?

4. Servers as cattle not pets

In the old days, we logged into servers & provided personal care & feeding. We treated them like pets.

In the new world of devops, we should treat servers like cattle. When it begins to fail, take it out back and shoot it. (tbh i don’t love the analogy, but it carries some meaning…)

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

5. Open to learnings & failures

Organizations that are open to failures, without playing the blame game, learn quicker & recover from problems faster.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

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Some irresistible reading for March – outages, code, databases, legacy & hiring

via GIPHY

I decided this week to write a different type of blog post. Because some of my favorite newsletters are lists of articles on topics of the day.

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Here’s what I’m reading right now.

1. On Outages

While everyone is scrambling to figure out why part of the internet went down … wait is S3 is part of the internet, really? While I’m figuring out if it is a service of Amazon, or if Amazon is so big that Amazon *is* the internet now…

Let’s look at s3 architectural flaws in depth.

Meanwhile Gitlab had an outage too in which they *gasp* lost data. Seriously? An outage is one thing, losing data though. Hmmm…

And this article is brilliant on so many levels. No least because Matthew knows that “post truth” is a trending topic now, and uses it his title. So here we go, AWS Service status truth in a post truth world. Wow!

And meanwhile the Atlantic tries to track down where exactly are those Amazon datacenters?

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

2. On Code

Project wise I’m fiddling around with a few fun things.

Take a look at Guy Geerling’s Ansible on a Mac playbooks. Nice!

And meanwhile a very nice deep dive on Amazon Lambda serverless best practices.

Brandur Leach explains how to build awesome APIs aka ones that are robust & idempotent

Meanwhile Frans Rosen explains how to 0wn slack. And no you don’t want this. ๐Ÿ™‚

Related: 5 surprising features in Amazon’s serverless Lambda offering

3. On Hiring & Talent

Are you a rock star dev or a digital nomad? Take a look at the 12 best international cities to live in for software devs.

And if you’re wondering who’s hiring? Well just about everyone!

Devs are you blogging? You should be.

Looking to learn or teach… check out codementor.

Also: why did dev & ops used to be separate job roles?

4. On Legacy Systems

I loved Drew Bell’s story of stumbling into home ownership, attempting to fix a doorbell, and falling down a familiar rabbit hole. With parallels to legacy software systems… aka any older then oh say five years?

Ian Bogost ruminates why nothing works anymore… and I don’t think an hour goes by where I don’t ask myself the same question!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

5. On Databases

If you grew up on the virtual world of the cloud, you may have never touched hardware besides your own laptop. Developing in this world may completely remove us from understanding those pesky underlying physical layers. Yes indeed folks containers do run in “virtual” machines, but those themselves are running on metal, somewhere down the stack.

With that let’s not forget that No, databases are not for containers… but a healthy reminder ain’t bad..

Meanwhile Larry’s mothership is sinking…(hint: Oracle) Does anybody really care? Now’s the time to revisit Mike Wilson’s classic The difference between god and Larry Ellison.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

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5 surprising features in Amazon’s Lambda serverless offering

Amazon is building out it’s serverless offering at a rapid clip. Lambda makes a great solution for a lot of different use cases including:

o a hybrid approach, building lambda functions for small pieces of your application, sitting along side your full application, working in concert with it

o working with Kinesis firehose to add ETL functionality into your pipeline. Extract Transform & Load is a method of transforming data from a relational or backend transactional databases, into one better fit for reporting & analytics.

o retrofitting your API? Layer Lambda functions in front, to allow you to rebuild in a managed way.

o a natural way to build microservices, with each function as it’s own little universe

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Great, tons of ways to put serverless to use. What’s Amazon doing to make it even better? Here are some of the features you’ll find indispensible in building with Lambda.

1. Versioned functions

As your serverless functions get more sophisticated, you’ll want to control & deploy different versions. Lambda supports this, allowing you to upload multiple copies of the same function. Coupled with Aliases below, this becomes a very powerful feature.

Also: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

2. Aliases

As you deploy multiple versions of your functions in AWS, you don’t want to recreate the API endpoints each time. That’s where aliases come in. Create one alias for dev, another for test, and a third for production. That way when new versions of those are deployed, all you have to do is change the alias & QA or customers will be hitting the new code. Cool!

Related: Are you getting errors building lambda functions?

3. Caching & throttling

Using the API gateway, we can do some fancy footwork with Lambda. First we can enabling caching to speedup access to our endpoint. Control the time-to-live, capacity of the cache easily. We’ll also need to invalidate the cache when we make changes & redeploy our functions.

Throttling is another useful feature, allowing you to control the maximum number of times your function can be called per second on average (the rate) and maximum number of times (burst limit). These can be set at both the stage & method levels.

Read: Is Amazon too big to fail?

4. Stage variables

Creating multiple stages, for dev, test & production means you can separate out and control environment variables with more granular control. For example suppose you have access & secret keys to reach S3. You can set environment variables for these to avoid committing any credentials or secrets in your code. Definitely don’t do that!

Allowing multiple copies of stage variables, means you can set them separately for dev, test & production.

Also: How to deploy on Amazon EC2 with Vagrant?

5. Logging

You can enable logging in your Lambda function configuration. This will send error and/or info warning messages out to CloudWatch.

You may also choose the log all of the request & response data. This is controlled in the API Gateway settings for individual stages.

Also: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

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Are engineering orgs like Google so different from sales driven ones like Oracle?

Editor & writer in friendly dialog

Over the years I’ve worked with over 100 different organizations. Two decades in the industry you see a lot of things. Some businesses are more engineering heavy, while others are more sales driven.

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So this past week, I was somewhat surprised because I met with two very different organizations, and the contrast stood out dramatically to me. Pando Daily called it the Clash of Cultures.

I wonder will we ever learn from eachother?

1. On Monday I met with CloudOne

I’m choosing a fictional name here, but the meeting was real. We met over lunch to discuss how we might work together. Their org has been around for years, has a phenomenal track record, and they are strongly sales oriented.

Some observations:

o They’re hungry. They pushed for client lists & sniffed for leads.
o They’re margin oriented, they had a clear idea of where their strong suit was, and what types of customers they wanted to work with. That’s because they had a clear idea of their margins.
o They understand the industry well, much better than I did.
o They could certainly talk circles around me in terms of industry categories & verticals.
o They glossed over technical details
o They made broad generalizations & mixed up facts at times

Also: Beware the sales wolf in sheep suits

2. On Thursday I met with DataOne

Here again I’m choosing a fictional name. We met over dinner to discuss my opinions of the market and also if I might have any venture leads or could make introductions.

Some Observations I came away with:

o Their company is all engineering.
o They’re intimately focused on coding & building the product.
o They downplayed product limitations & somewhat out of touch with customer.
o They seemed to be feeling around in the dark for investors
o They seemed to have a weak network

Related: When you have to take the fall

3. Org experience: LearnOne

One of my past customers, also a fictional name here, they were also an incredibly sales heavy organization.

Some Observations:

o Their monthly standups felt like a sporting huddle.
o Lots of ra ra ra & high fives
o They were extremely sales driven, growing rapidly
o They had tremendous problems around engineering.
o They seemed to be boxing wayyy above their weight class.

Read: 5 Things I learned from Dvaid Maister about trust & advising clients

4. Cross-cultural studies

As a consultant I find this all fascinating. It often seems like this cultural style is driven from the top. The big movers are the ones who shape the organization.

I think of Google as an incredible example of an engineering driven organization. Finding top people is always about math & problem solving, but short on personality emphasis. Meanwhile their products lack the UI polish, but are functionally accurate & always fast.

Contrast that with Oracle, which send in a heavy armament of perfect suits to close a deal, negotiate soft until you’re firm is locked in, then jack up the license fees until you bleed. Meanwhile although the product is a sturdy technical construction, it’s every bit the marketing that is smooth & polished.

Also: Why is devops talent in short supply?

5. The takeaway

A winning team needs both. I’m obviously born of the engineering camp, but I agree with Ben Horowitz that the new enterprise customer is much like the old enterprise customer. And yes sales matters more than ever before.

At the same time the engineering team needs to carry equal weight, and decisions for both teams need to be framed as tradeoffs for the other.

Also: Five ways to build an analytics database with Amazon Redshift

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What events are good for tech & startup networking in New York City?

garys guide events

I’ve worked in the NYC startup scene since the mid-nineties. It seems to keep growing every year, and there are so many events it’s hard to keep track.

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Here’s where to look for the best stuff.

1. Gary’s Guide

Gary Sharma hosts an authoritative guide to all the events in the new york tech & startup scene. It’s sort of the one-stop shop for knowing what’s going on.

Lucky for us, in a city the size of new york, there’s an opportunity to meet & network with people everyday of the week.

Also: 5 core pieces of the Amazon cloud puzzle to get your project off the ground

2. Meetups

Meetup.com is another invaluable resource. There are technical groups & social ones, and plenty of niche groups to for specific areas of interest.

For example there’s NYC Tech Talks, NY Women in Tech, Tech for good & NY Entrepreneurs & Startup Network. There are plenty more.

Related: Some thoughts on 12-factor apps

3. Eventbrite

A lot of events us Eventbrite for ticketing, so it turns out to be a great place to search. Some of the startup related events .

Read: Why dropbox didn’t have to fail

4. Techdrinkup

Michael Gold’s #techdrinkup event keeps getting bigger & better. More social hour than presentations & such, you’re sure to bump elbows with some folks in NY’s exploding tech scene.

Take a look at some of the event photos on their facebook page.

Also: How do hackers secure their Amazon Web Services account?

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Five things I learned at NY CTO Summit 2015

cto summit 2015

Enjoyed attending the New York CTO Summit yesterday with a notable list of presenters. Looking forward to the slides. Links to follow.

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1. Product is a reflection of teams

Conway’s law was repeated by three different presenters!

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

2. Agile government

Government efficiency can be tackled with startup efficiencies!

Related: Is AWS enabling Angellist to boil the VC business?

3. Learning culture

There are lots of benefits to building a learning culture, not least is making the business succeed.

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Don’t report to finance

Let’s remember how important which teams report to whom is. It can make or break your technology initiatives.

Also: Is Amazon too big to fail?

5. Course correction & size

The cost of changing course gets bigger as your org does.

Also: Airbnb didn’t have to fail

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Does Linux tell the Gilgamesh story of hacker culture?

stephenson command line

Is the command line still essential?
Was Stephenson right about his Linux

It’s been a while since I read Stephenson’s essay on Linux. It’s one of those pieces that’s so well written, we need to go back to it now & then.

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This quote caught my eye right away.

“…as living in a commune, where much lip service was paid to ideals of peace, love and harmony, had deprived them of normal, socially approved outlets for their control freakdom, it tended to come out in other invariably more sinister ways. Applying this to the case of Apple Computer will be left as an exercise for the reader, and not a very difficult exercise.”

Anyone who has read about Steve Jobs will chuckle at this one.

1. The Hole Hawg of the internet

When Stephenson wrote this it was 1999. Linux adoption was growing at internet startups, where cost was everything, and risks could be taken. Remember this was before the two biggest data center companies even existed, namely Google & Amazon. Without Linux, neither would be here today!

hole hawg power

Linux was and is today more like a Hole Hawg for the internet, powerful, but dangerous in the wrong hands. ๐Ÿ™‚


“The Hole Hawg is like the genie of the ancient fairy tales, who carries out his masters instructions literally and precisely and with unlimited power, often with disasterous unforseen consequences.”

Also: Why I like Etsy’s site performance report

2. Unix as oral history, our Gilgamesh

gilgamesh unix


“Unix, by contrast is not so much a product as it is a painstakingly compiled oral history of the hacker subculture. It is our Gilgamesh. What made old epics like Gilgamesh so powerful and so long-lived was that they were living bodies of narrative that many people knew by heart, and told over and over again — making their own personal embellishments whenever it struck their fancy.”

Also: Are SQL Databases dead?

3. The bizarre Trinity Torvalds, Stallman & Gates


“In trying to understand the Linux phenomenon, then, we have to look not to a single innovator but to a sort of bizarre Trinity, Linus Torvalds, Richard Stallman and Bill Gates. Take away any of these three & Linux would not exist.”

And indeed we must thank all three of these characters for where the internet stands today. The cloud is possible because of Linux & cheap intel hardware. And the GNU free software to go along with it.

Related: Did MySQL & Mongo have a beautiful baby called Aurora?

4. On the meaning of “Open Source”


“Source files are useless to your computer, and of little interest to most users, but they are of gigantic cultural & political significance, because Microsoft & Apple keep them secret, while Linux makes them public. They are the family Jewels. They are the sort of thing that in Hollywood thrillers is used as a McGuffin: the plutonium bomb core, the top-secret blueprints, the suitcase of bearer bonds, the reel of microfilm.

Read: When hosting data on Amazon turns bloodsport

5. What about Apple today?


“The ideal OS for me would be one that had a well-designed GUI that was easy to set up and use, but that included terminal windows where I could revert to the command line interface and run GNU software when it made sense.”

Stephenson wrote this before Apple has rebuilt their OS to sit on top of Unix. And that’s where we are today with Mac OS X!

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon??

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Is Amazon too big to fail?

aws fault tolerance

Amazon is the huge online retailer everyone knows well. However there is another side of Amazon, namely Amazon Web Services that hosts many of the internets largest websites.

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In the infrastructure & operations world, Amazon is the Citibank, JP Morgan or Goldman Sachs of cloud providers.

1. Outage takes down Yelp & Netflix

As reported on Thousand Eyes among other places, Amazon had a major outage yesterday.

Amazon experienced a problem with how they route data over the network. Routing is the technical term for how the internet moves data around. When routing goes wrong at a provider like Amazon, the websites they host will go down too.

Also: Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon?

2. Automation can’t save you

Netflix is famous for their great streaming service, and shows like House of Cards.

On the technology side they’re also pretty famous. They deploy legions of Amazon servers to stream movies using Chaos Monkey. This open source suite allows them to remain resilient even if individual servers or components go offline.

Yet a heavy reliance on Amazon itself, meant a wider outage for them was also an outage for Netflix.

Related: What tech do startups use most?

3. Of cloud monopolies

Amazon’s dominance in the cloud hosting space is incredible. There are providers that can beat them in compute power, speed & price. But with their incredible reach of global datacenters & relentless growth they are still the first choice for most internet shops.

What is the downside of such dominance? What happened yesterday illustrates it clearly. When Amazon goes down, so do financial companies like Experian,

Read: Do managers underestimate operational cost?

4. Diversify your data portfolio

In the banking world we can put together legislation, regulating banks. We can enact capital requirements or consider breaking up the largest ones. For investors & consumers you can diversify your portfolio, putting money in different asset classes & institutions. If one fund fails, others will balance it out.

We can do the same with cloud hosting. For larger internet applications, deploying on multiple clouds can be very beneficial. In that case an outage at Amazon, would merely mean your global load balancer kicks in, sending traffic to your plan B servers.

Also: Replicate big data to Amazon Redshift with Tungsten

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Are we fast approaching cloud-mageddon ?

storm coming

One look at StackShare’s trending technologies, and you’ll discover the exploding growth of languages, webservers, load balancers, databases, caching servers, automation & monitoring tools, continuous integration suites & a broad spectrum of Software as a service solutions.

The choices today boggles the mind. Choice is good, but too much choice can mean trouble too.

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1. What am I actually using?

Erich Schubert wrote a superb piece about the sad state of the sysadmin in the age of containers. Here’s what caught my eye:

Stack is the new term for “I have no idea what I’m actually using”.

That definitely rings true for me. The customers I’m seeing these days have such complicated stacks, that nobody really knows what’s installed. That’s dangerous!

Also: Do today’s startups assemble at their own risk?

2. Embrace failure more broadly

Recently I wrote a blog post asking Is AWS the patient that needs constant medication?. It got a lot of traction, and here’s why I think that happened.

AWS uses very commodity, cheapo components. The assumption is, with an infinitely redundant datacenter, component failure is ok. It’s ordinary & everyday.

Unfortunately most startups, even ones that employ some Ansible & devops, still don’t have Netflix grade automation.

Those regularly everyday failures are still getting detected by old-school manual monitoring. And that’s a recipe for trouble

Also: 5 Things toxic to scalability

3. What are complex systems?

In this excellent deck, James Urquhart talks about emergent behavior in complex systems. It’s worth a quick read.

***

Read: How I find entrepreneurial focus

4. What to do? Do you like boring?

Dan McKinley formerly principal engineer at Etsy & now with Stripe wrote a brilliant essay arguing for boring technology.

This comes as a shock to many in the startup world. It sort of smacks in the face of open source, or does it?

I worked in the enterprise space as an Oracle DBA for a decade starting in the mid-nineties. Among DBAs there was always a chuckle when a new version of Oracle came out. No one wanted to touch it with a ten foot pole. Sure we’d install it on test boxes, start learning the new features and so forth. But deploy it? No way, wait a good 2 or even 3 years before upgrading.

Meanwhile management was eager for the latest software. Don’t we want the newest? The Oracle sales guys would be selling the virtues of all sorts of features that nobody needed right away anyway.

Choosing boring components takes discipline to fight sexy new technologies & bleeding edge versions. But staid & stodgy wins you everyday in operations uptime.

Related: Is automation killing old-school operations?

5. Use tried & tested components

Do you find your application or stack contains java, ruby, python & PHP? Choose one.

One webserver like nginx, one caching server like memcache or redis, one search server like solr or elasticsearch, one database like MySQL or postgres. Standardize all your components on one image, so you can use that for all your servers, regardless of which you use.

Fewer components will mean fewer interdependencies, less maintenance, & less chaos.

Also: What’s the luckiest thing that’s happened in your career?

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