Category Archives: iHeavy Newsletter

Open Insights 51 – Stretch Your Database Dollar

Open Insights Newsletter

Issue 51 – Stretch Your Database Dollar

  January 1, 2009

by Sean Hull


2009 is finally here.  Let’s put the struggles of 2008 and the last few months behind us, and take the downturn as an opportunity to dig in, work harder, and get creative in business. 


In This Issue:

1. Feature: Stretch Your Database Dollar

2. Current Reading

3. Podcast Reviews

4. Past Issues

5. Technical Articles

6. Audio Interviews

7. Lightweight Humor

8. About Heavyweight Internet Group


1. Feature: Stretch Your Database Dollar

I’ve taken to listening to some podcasts by the Financial Times of late.  A particularly good one which is very relevant to Information Technology is called Digital Business.  It’s a weekly show hosted by Peter Whitehead, Editor of FT.com’s Digital business section. 

The last episode of 2008 is one of particular interest, and I’d recommend it to readers of this newsletter.  In it  Whitehead discusses trends for 2009.  Obviously with the recent shift in markets and availability of credit 2009 will be a lot about stretching your budgets, and making your dollar go further. 

Interviewee Alan Kane suggests that virtualization and going green to save money will both be big trends in 2009.  Steven Pritchard emphasizes Software As A Service, Cloud Computing, and notably open source, will all be big in 2009.  It will also be a year for the public sector, with all the new government spending initiatives planned.  Finally, Whitehead adds that as web2.0 has ramped up it has opened a whole new category of vulnerabilities thus web2.0 security will become a new priority.  He also loves Twitter, and points to it’s recent explosive growth as a trend which will surely be significant in 2009.

Obviously we’ve been talking about open-source for years.  With the heady mix of flexibility, few licensing restrictions, and customizability, it has always appealed to the do-it-yourself side of the IT world.  But as IT managers look to optimise their budgets, I can definitely see how open-source will win even greater consideration. 

In fact anecdotally I’ve already seen an up tick in the number of companies calling us about MySQL in the fourth quarter of 2008.  MySQL has matured from the web-facing mini-database of five or ten years ago to a real force to be reckoned with.

MySQL for those new to the technology, started out as a lightweight, primarily web-facing database.  It’s limited feature set and transactional support posed little problem for the mostly read-only web-based applications it was designed for.  But as MySQL 4 came online, a transactional storage engine named InnoDB was added providing read-consistency, and recoverability of data.  In 5.0 more and more enterprise features have become available, including stored procedures, functions, views, subqueries, complex joins, as well as a whole host of sophisticated caching mechanisms to make data access even faster.  I now hear from clients supporting terabyte MySQL databases, using partitioning and other features previously only available in the more powerful commercial databases like Oracle. 

If I might add my own predictions of trends for 2009, I would reaffirm Pritchard’s forecast of growth in open-source adoption, as IT shops look to squeeze more out of their budgets.  In particular we expect MySQL to be a big part of this.  We’ve already seen shops moving some of their enterprise data to MySQL in an effort to gradually test the waters.  I firmly expect this trend to continue as IT staff & managers’ confidence in the

technology grows, and as familiarity with its strengths and weaknesses improves.  Awareness of where the technology can fit in well, what type of jobs it is well suited for, and how to roll it into the mix without disrupting services will be crucial.

For DBAs all this will mean beginning to look at the technology, and building test and sandbox environments.  For managers it will mean porting small and peripheral applications, testing for performance, reliability, benchmarking, and recoverability.  All of these will weigh heavier as you look at moving more core business functions onto the open-source database platform.


2. Current Reading

Reality Check by Guy Kawasaki

Some like irreverent writing, and some don’t.  Kawasaki’s subtitle is "the irreverent guide to outsmarting, outmanaging, and outmarketing your competition" sets the tone right out of the gates.  I find his writing to be smart and hardhitting, and very relevant.  This new book is no exception.  The Standard has a piece Five reasons why a recession is a good time to start a company.  I have to agree, and Kawasaki’s book will provide you with tons of cut-to-the chase, and get-the-job-done advice.  Highly recommended.


3. Podcast Reviews

I’ve been trolling through iTunes in the last few weeks, and have found some real gems.  With that in mind I decided to add a new section to the newsletter to focus on interesting, and technology relevant shows that I find.  By far the best one I’ve stumbled upon is Financial Times – Digital Business

For instance the September 10th episode of this year talked about Mesh Collaboration, Globalization, and Social Networking.  Definitely worth a listen.

You can read it online with updates almost everyday, and the print edition comes out on alternate wednesdays.  The podcast you can find here.


4. Past Issues

Issue 50 – Do Your Dishes

Issue 49 – Things Fall Apart

Issue 48 – Balancing Time & Money

Issue 47 – Change the Problem

Issue 46 – Interests Aligned

Issue 45 – Contractualities

Issue 44 – Gaining Legs

Newsletter Archives


5. Technical Articles

Intro to Oracle’s Automatic Workload Repository

Intro to PHP + Oracle

Useful PL/SQL Packages

Oracle Automatic Storage Management

Programming Perl + Oracle


6. Audio Interviews

Though we haven’t added a new audio interview in a while, we certainly plan to do some new interviews in the coming months.  So please stay tuned.  In the meantime, please listen to our past audio interviews.

In our last interview we had the opportunity to talk with Norman Yamada CTO of Millburn Corporation.

Norman shares with us his experiences providing world-class computing solutions, and the pros and cons of doing it with open source.

We are hosting our podcast to Odeo.  It is a great service, and provides all the RSS and subscribe links automatically.  So please subscribe if you haven’t already.


7. Lightweight Humor

The Onion does it again, this time with "Apple Employee Fired for Thinking Different"


8. About Heavyweight Internet Group

We’ve always been about open-source technology, integration & mixing commercial technologies such as Oracle with open-source ones such as MySQL and Linux.  As open-source becomes mainstream, and more shops consider moving critical services to these technologies, we continue to provide assistance and expertise for these transitions.  Whether it is performance testing and tuning, benchmarking, high availability or recovery, we can provide services for your specific needs.

Looking for a top-flight DBA?  Visit us on the web at www.iheavy.com.

Open Insights 50 – Do Your Dishes

Open Insights Newsletter

Issue 50 – Do Your Dishes

December 1, 2008

by Sean Hull


Here we are into the holidays already.  I’m happy to have reached the 50th issue of Open Insights, and plan to bring another 50.  Thanks to everyone for reading.

2008 has brought us a lot of surprises, none of which need further repeating.  Let’s take the downturn as an opportunity to dig in, work harder, and get creative in business. 

With that, I wish all of you a peaceful holiday season, and happy new  year 2009!


In This Issue:

1. Feature: Do Your Dishes

2. Current Reading

3. Podcast Reviews

4. Past Issues

5. Technical Articles

6. Audio Interviews

7. Lightweight Humor

8. About Heavyweight Internet Group


1. Feature: Do Your Dishes

Many people ask me how I manage time.  The truth is I’m pretty good at staying on top of things but I wasn’t always.  There was a time, I guess everyone had their moments in college, where I was quite the procrastinator.

So people wonder how did I get a hold of the discipline to start a business, and keep it going for a decade?

A Funny Analogy

Even if you haven’t had roomates, you can probably appreciate this story.  Perhaps you’ve lived by yourself, or just didn’t have someone around taking care of you.  So it was left up to you to do the dishes.  You know it doesn’t matter how lazy you are, or how on-top of things you are, we all have to do the same amount of dishes.  That’s right, you can either do the dishes AFTER you use them, or BEFORE you use them.

What do I mean?  Well on the one hand there’s the person who stays ahead of the game, does them right after dinner.  The other person doesn’t feel like doing them, so they leave them sitting around.  But when they need a dish, they have to do it before hand.  So really, they end up with the same amount of work.  The only difference is the on-top of things person had a clean smelling kitchen, and the procrastinator had a smelly kitchen.  The procrastination didn’t really save them any work.  Actually it probably caused *MORE* work.

So there’s the theory.  In practice people need to use this method for a while and start to like it before they will really feel it. 

Back To Consulting

Doing freelance consulting is much the same way.   You always have the opportunity to put off work until another day.  And it’s tempting, like a credit card, or like not doing the dishes.  However the advantages of staying ahead of your game are legion. 

For starters you come across professional.  If you have things done on time, this is immeasurable.  And it turns out to be somewhat rare, so your clients will really appreciate it.

Next it allows you to have contingency plans.  If something happens, you’ll be able to absorb the distractions, mess, or other detours that can derail your timeline and prevent you from delivering on time.

One of my favorites though is always being available.  If you’re waiting too long, you’re dealing with crunch time.  It sneaks up on you, and starts to impinge on your social life, or other important things you’d like to do.  What’s more if someone contacts you during crunch time, you are definitely not available.  However, if you stay ahead of your game, distractions are a pleasant surprise, and a needed respite.  Get some air and come back, and your productivity will probably improve.  And this availability doesn’t just extend to new projects that appear on the horizon, it also applies to your social schedule.  You have more options to shift things around if you are way ahead of deadline.

But probably the most important reason is it’s just less stressful.  If you stay ahead of things, you don’t have that deadline weighing on the back of your mind.  If you wait for two weeks until the last minute, you enjoy that interim time a lot less than if you did the work at the outset. 

In the end if you want to be together, run a solo or small business, you really have to keep up with things.  That means doing the dishes at the earliest opportunity, and keeping yourself organized, focused, and ultimately, carefree!


2. Current Reading

The Numerati  by Stephen Baker

Data mining is a hot word these days if google search results, or technorati are any indication.  Baker charts a course looking at entrepreneur mathematicians he dubs "The Numerati".   They are using data mining in new ways to put the vast array of data to use, customizing our buying experiences, or offering us products we didn’t know we’d like.  It’s an interesting if sometimes cautious look at what the future may hold.


3. Podcast Reviews

I’ve been trolling through iTunes in the last few weeks, and have found some real gems.  With that in mind I decided to add a new section to the newsletter to focus on interesting, and technology relevant shows that I find.  By far the best one I’ve stumbled upon is Financial Times – Digital Business

For instance the September 10th episode of this year talked about Mesh Collaboration, Globalization, and Social Networking.  Definitely worth a listen.

You can read it online with updates almost everyday, and the print edition comes out on alternate wednesdays.  The podcast you can find here.


4. Past Issues

Issue 49 – Things Fall Apart

Issue 48 – Balancing Time & Money

Issue 47 – Change the Problem

Issue 46 – Interests Aligned

Issue 45 – Contractualities

Issue 44 – Gaining Legs

Newsletter Archives


5. Technical Articles

Intro to Oracle’s Automatic Workload Repository

Intro to PHP + Oracle

Useful PL/SQL Packages

Oracle Automatic Storage Management

Programming Perl + Oracle


6. Audio Interviews

Though we haven’t added a new audio interview in a while, we certainly plan to do some new interviews in the coming months.  So please stay tuned.  In the meantime, please listen to our past audio interviews.

In our last interview we had the opportunity to talk with Norman Yamada CTO of Millburn Corporation.

Norman shares with us his experiences providing world-class computing solutions, and the pros and cons of doing it with open source.

We are hosting our podcast to Odeo.  It is a great service, and provides all the RSS and subscribe links automatically.  So please subscribe if you haven’t already.


7. Lightweight Humor

Sadly, even with humor we have to make a nod to the stockmarket meltdown.  With that I give you the 401 Keg Plan


8. About Heavyweight Internet Group

In a nutshell, databases.  More and more we have clients asking us to manage MySQL at the enterprise level.  With twelve years experience dealing with databases in the enterprise, we bring a wealth of experience to the table on open-source platforms such as MySQL, and traditional enterprise solutions like Oracle.  Whether it is high availability, redundancy, scaling, tuning, or troubleshooting, we can bring you the same level of service and expertise we’ve been delivering for years.

Looking for a top-flight DBA?  Visit us on the web at www.iheavy.com.

Open Insights 49 – Things Fall Apart

Open Insights Newsletter

Issue 49 – Things Fall Apart

November 1, 2008

by Sean Hull


In This Issue:

1. Feature: Things Fall Apart

2. Current Reading

3. Podcast Reviews

4. Past Issues

5. Technical Articles

6. Audio Interviews

7. Lightweight Humor

8. About Heavyweight Internet Group


1. Feature: Things Fall Apart

This month it’s hard for talk of the economy not to makes it way into the conversation.  Our recent global economic meltdown, and in many places near collapse of our banking system have given people the jitters far beyond their retirement and stock investments.  When the fed needs to reassure people that FDIC will be backed 100%, and when I find myself checking into my various bank accounts, and whether their insured, you have to wonder if we’re only a whisper away from a larger run on the banking system.

This month I’ll speak a bit about economics, but mainly to use it as an illustration of larger truths which pervade technology, and consulting projects. 

Complex Systems Break

The first lesson is that complex systems break.  It seems obvious in retrospect, but before the fact these sophisticated systems often because of their size somehow seem more reliable.   So the sudden revelation that they’re actually quite fragile leaves many people shocked and bewildered.

I find myself trolling finance sites like Baseline Scenario, Economic Principals, and Vinny Catalano’s Blog, or listening to NPR’s Planet Money, or FT’s Money Show.  These are all good resources, and certainly do shed a lot of light on what’s been happening. 

Whenever I talk to clients about Oracle technology, or the open-source MySQL, they are often surprised to learn that these enterprise class systems have bugs and problems.  I would almost argue this is more prevalent in departments implement Oracle not because there are more bugs, but more because the bar has been raised higher by the investment dollars, and the marketing folks who sell everything as bulletproof or what is the latest fad term "unbreakable".  All large enterprise level database systems have bugs, issues, and implementation challenges. 

Put simpler, complex systems break.  You need to monitor and manage them closely, be honest about the risks & problem areas, and be prudent about how far out on a limb you’re willing to hang.

Internet Applications, Markets, Dominoes and Interconnecting Pieces

Our recent lessons in the fragility of the global financial systems tells us that their are a huge number of interconnecting pieces.  Huge amounts of new wealth looking for places to invest, mortgages rolled up and repackaged, and sold in foreign markets,  ratings agencies, and regulatory bodies not doing their jobs. 

When the web first got big, a lot of sites were trying to build on heavy technologies.  Examples

might include sites that built using Java which required a lot of overhead, and heavy memory usage, and really didn’t match the lightweight, high transaction nature of the internet.  ASP.NET in some senses falls into this category as well.  This is why you’re seeing more and more sites built on PHP, especially huge very interactive sites like Facebook.  And look how snappy that site responds.

The connection here is that transparency is good, many simpler working components that you can optimize individually is helpful, and each of those pieces being small and lightweight is a good thing.

Lessons Learned

I was listening to Fareed Zakaria on CNN the other day, and one of the financial advisors said "great economic events shape the way people act".  He was referring to how the great depression spawned hears of saving, and a whole different philosophy around money than we have today.  It was more generally frowned upon to get into debt, and being in debt was something you wanted to get out of as quickly as possible.

That’s a far cry from where we were in the 90′s and 2000′s where I commonly saw people buying cocktails at bars with their credit cards.  The idea of the credit card extending your wealth is commonly accepted.  And the idea of businesses, banks, or even countries living on an overly huge amount of debt had become commonplace.  I suspect that will change quite a lot now, as it should.

The lessons I would take away from this in terms of consulting, and technology projects would be three-fold. 

(1) Don’t bite of more than you can chew.  Develop less first, and make your milestones conservative, that way when things get messy, as they always do, you’ll have some give in the schedule.

(2) Be realistic about risks.  This pertains to what technology can do, it’s potentials, as well as it’s hidden surprises.  Expect things to break, and plan for that.  Monitor, and be proactive, especially around areas whose inner workings are less understood.

(3) Be ready with the firefighters.  As the fed deals with the current crisis, trying to put out fires as fast as it can, you should have people at the ready in the same capacity.  Your on-call people should understand some of the problem areas, and know who to call if something falls out of their scope, or area of expertise.


2. Current Reading

The Undercover Economist by Tim Hartford

Most of us are not classically trained as economists, so we need coffee table books to dispense the wisdom.  This is one of those books.  I particularly liked one chapter where he uses Starbucks as a case study.  They have drinks of prices ranging from the inexpensive $1 or so to $4 and up.  Yet if you look at the underlying costs, they are all about the same plus or minus a few cents to produce.  What they are doing is providing thrifty customers inexpensive choices, and customers more cavalier about price with expensive alternatives.  Businesses that use this technique can have it both ways, being appealing to high-end consumers, as well as thrifty ones.  The same technique works in business, and is the way to appealing to a wider field of potential buyers of products and services.  A very interesting read.


3. Podcast Reviews

I’ve been trolling through iTunes in the last few weeks, and have found some real gems.  With that in mind I decided to add a new section to the newsletter to focus on interesting, and technology relevant shows that I find.  By far the best one I’ve stumbled upon is Financial Times – Digital Business

For instance the September 10th episode of this year talked about Mesh Collaboration, Globalization, and Social Networking.  Definitely worth a listen.

You can read it online with updates almost everyday, and the print edition comes out on alternate wednesdays.  The podcast you can find here.


4. Past Issues

Issue 48 – Balancing Time & Money

Issue 47 – Change the Problem

Issue 46 – Interests Aligned

Issue 45 – Contractualities

Issue 44 – Gaining Legs

Newsletter Archives


5. Technical Articles

Intro to Oracle’s Automatic Workload Repository

Intro to PHP + Oracle

Useful PL/SQL Packages

Oracle Automatic Storage Management

Programming Perl + Oracle


6. Audio Interviews

Though we haven’t added a new audio interview in a while, we certainly plan to do some new interviews in the coming months.  So please stay tuned.  In the meantime, please listen to our past audio interviews.

In our last interview we had the opportunity to talk with Norman Yamada CTO of Millburn Corporation.

Norman shares with us his experiences providing world-class computing solutions, and the pros and cons of doing it with open source.

We are hosting our podcast to Odeo.  It is a great service, and provides all the RSS and subscribe links automatically.  So please subscribe if you haven’t already.


7. Lightweight Humor

Sadly, even with humor we have to make a nod to the stockmarket meltdown.  With that I give you the 401 Keg Plan


8. About Heavyweight Internet Group

In a nutshell, databases.  More and more we have clients asking us to manage MySQL at the enterprise level.  With twelve years experience dealing with databases in the enterprise, we bring a wealth of experience to the table on open-source platforms such as MySQL, and traditional enterprise solutions like Oracle.  Whether it is high availability, redundancy, scaling, tuning, or troubleshooting, we can bring you the same level of service and expertise we’ve been delivering for years.

Looking for a top-flight DBA?  Visit us on the web at www.iheavy.com.

Open Insights 48 – Balancing Time & Money

OPEN INSIGHTS Newsletter

Issue 48 – Balancing Time & Money

  Oct 1, 2008

by Sean Hull

This month’s dispatch comes to you direct from London where we’re anxiously watching the Wall Street meltdown from the bleachers.

Like what you see here? Forward us to a friend.

Comments are always welcome, please direct them to Sean Hull – shull at iheavy.com


In This Issue:

1. Feature: Balancing Time & Money

2. New Articles

3. Audio Interviews

4. Current Reading

5. Lightweight Humor

6. Miscellaneous

7. Past Issues

8. Technical Articles

9. About Heavyweight Internet Group


1. Feature: Balancing Time & Money

Balancing Time & Money

I was just talking today with a friend. She called for advice. She had a number of different projects in front of her, offering various career directions. Some provided measurable income, while others were gratifying to work on, and still others offered a larger potential return, but remained more nebulous in the short term.

I explained one method I use to help clarify things. I divide time by total income. It shocks me how simple this equation is, and how surprising the numbers are often to someone, when they really look at it.

A Couple of Examples

For example, let’s say she has a full-time job making $50,000 for arguments sake. Let’s also say that she works eight hours most days, but also works 3-5 hours extra two days per week. We’ll average that to 8 extra hours. She also gets no paid vacation. So, calculators out, 48 hours/week x 52 weeks = 2496 hours. $50,000 divided by 2496 equals $20/hr. If there are benefits go ahead and factor those in, by counting *ONLY* the company contribution.

Another example. I know a few bankers who get into work at 7:30am, and work until 10pm regularly. We’ll estimate a half hour for lunch. They even work weekends sometimes. Let’s say they work every other weekend, 10 hours total. That adds 5 hours to each week. Now you’re gonna say, yeah but they get a handsome salary and bonus. Yep, that they do. Let’s say base is $120,000 and bonus is $50,000. So total is $170,000 for 75 hours per week. Now the first thing I’m thinking is, why not work two $120,000/year salary jobs, and make $240k. But I’m not done yet. Let’s say they get two weeks paid vacation. So we’ll count 50 weeks. 75 times 50 equals 3750 hours. And guess what, that’s $45/hour. Ok granted I didn’t count benefits, but still. Here’s the really interesting part. The base of $120,000 divided by 40 hours (times 50 weeks) comes to $60 per hour!! The extra hours (which in consulting are normally billed out at time and one half because they are more burdensome on your life) 35 times 50 equals 1750 hours for $50,000 bonus paid out only $28.50/hour. I can think of a lot of jobs that pay more.

If you’re going to go ahead and do these calculations, I suggest you include the benefits you get, such as medical and 401k contributions. But let’s also be fair and include commute time as work time. Why? Because if you work from home, you save that time. It’s not to say freelancing is for everyone, but for comparison purposes, it’s worth looking at.

Striking a Balance

So back to my friend’s dilemma. Sure there is more to life than money. There is the time you spend with friends and family, or on your own leisure pursuits. Or perhaps you have a side business you are working on, or a million other reasons. You certainly have to balance all these factors. How much money you’ll make can impact how much time you have positively or negatively, but if the job kills you, it may impact your well-being in other ways. So sure, go ahead and consider everything, juggle and balance in a way that is right for you. But don’t do it without all the facts, and figuring out your hourly rate, is one eye-opening exercise you won’t regret.



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2. New Articles

Intro to Oracle’s Automatic Workload Repository

Intro to PHP + Oracle

Useful PL/SQL Packages

Oracle Automatic Storage Management

Programming, Perl + Oracle

Oracle Indexing – What, Where, Why?

Create a Database Manually – When & Why?

Migrating MySQL to Oracle – Part I

Migrating MySQL to Oracle – Part II

Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM)

 

Eight Ways to Hack Oracle – Part I

Eight Ways to Hack Oracle – Part II

Oracle, MySQL and Postgres – Feature Comparison Part I

Oracle, MySQL and Postgres – Feature Comparison Part II

Open Source Technologies for Oracle DBAs Part I

Open Source Technologies for Oracle DBAs Part II

3. Audio Interviews

In our last interview we had the opportunity to talk with Norman Yamada CTO of Millburn Corporation.

Norman shares with us his experiences providing world-class computing solutions, and the pros and cons of doing it with open source.

We’ve also moved our podcast to Odeo for Audio Podcast hosting. It is a great service, and provides all the RSS and subscribe links automatically. So please subscribe if you haven’t already!

4. Current Reading

Globalization and It’s Discontents by Joseph Stiglitz

If there were ever a time to discuss some of the more troublesome aspects of globalization, now would be that time. Stiglitz’s book is an excellent antidote to always shiny-happy Thomas-Friedman-world-is-flat optimism that I suspect is quickly falling out of favor these days.

5. Lightweight Humor

A little inane humor to brighten up your day…  Jessica Hagy has this cute little blog called indexed.  She uses index cards to illustrate little truisms, often with funny comments on venn diagrams.  Here’s a funny one the relationship of status to money.

6. Miscellaneous

We all want to optimize our sites for Google.  I mean other than a select few, that’s where most of our traffic comes from, so the more our site plays well with Google, the more users, readers, customers, and clients will find their way to us.

Most of the SEO material I’ve read has been pretty sparse, and unclear.  But I’ve been following the topic over at my good Felix’s #comments blog, and I’m starting to get it.  So you can too!  Take a read: Google loves me, again!

If you haven’t been following the news on the topic, take a look over at this NY Times piece: Silicon Valley Start-Ups Awash in Dollars, Again.  Personally I don’t think there is much hysteria this time around, sure there’s some, but not much.  The industry is more mature now, and computers in general have lost their initial wow factor, so people are general more sober, and able to step back and see what is actually useful, can make money, is making money, or might well make money.  That’s the root of investing smart.

7. Past Issues

Issue 47: Change the Problem

Issue 46: Interests Aligned

Issue 45: Contractualities

Issue 44: Gaining Legs

Issue 43: On Prudence

Issue 42: On Efficiency

Issue 41: Roshomon Effect

Issue 40: Self Taught

Issue 39: Reputation Management

Issue 38: Are You Fast Failing

Issue 37: A Real Open Book

Issue 36: Rarity of Excellence

Issue 34: Hindsight Is Always 20/20

Issue 33: Market For Experts

Issue 32: Different Heritages

Archive: Past Issues

8. Technical Articles

Oracle DBA Interview: click here

Tools for the Intrepid DBA: click here

Oracle9i + RAC on Linux/Firewire: click here

Migrating MySQL to Oracle: click here

MySQL Disaster Recovery: click here

9. About Heavyweight Internet Group

In a nutshell, Oracle. Everything related to and surrounding the database technology we specialize in, but specifically setup, admin and tuning of Oracle technology. I have 10 years experience with Oracle, wrote a book on the technology, and write and lecture frequently. I’m founder and senior consultant of the company. In capacities where your company might hire Deloitte, AIG, or Oracle Consulting we can bring the same level of service and experience, at about half the price. Simple equation.

Looking for a top-flight DBA? Visit us on the web at www.iheavy.com.