Category Archives: Book review

5 Things I just learned from James Turnbull about Docker

docker containers

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I just got my hands on a copy of James Turnbull’s new book The Docker Book. It’s an excellent introduction to Linux containers & the powerful things you can do with them. It’s 335 pages covering all the introductory topics to get you up and running and then more advanced topics like working with the docker API, building services & extending docker.

Here’s what I learned…

1. Containers aren’t new

The technology today we call containers in Unix is based on chroot mechanism which was introduced way back in the 80′s.

With traditional virtualization, we use a hypervisor layer, so we emulate hardware. The virtual machine running on top, can run anything, from Windows, to different flavors & versions of unix. It appears to be a completely separate piece of hardware.

With containers we move up to the operating system level, and we create isolation between users. These users all share the same parent operating system. This means it requires dramatically less overhead. That means speed!

Docker is an automation layer built on Lightweight Linux Containers or LXC. To applications it looks like they have their own machine, their own userspace, their own filesystem, their own network.

Also: Is Apple betting against big data?

2. No more VirtualBoxes

Are you tired of waiting for your VMs to spinup? Building dev & test environments becomes lightening fast with Docker. This accelerates software development, and makes a lot of things easier.

Also: When prospects mislead

3. Images, registries & containers

Images share some of the properties of images in hypervisor virtualization. However they are implemented with union file systems. While VirtualBox images take some time to boot, as the entire filesystem must be read & code executed anew, docker images are more like source code to the LXC subsystem.

Registries store your public and private images. The Docker Hub is one popular one. You can also host & deploy your own docker registry as your needs dictate.

Like VMs, containers can be started & stopped at will, albeit at lightening fast speed. They can also be deleted much as a VM can be.

Also: What can new york fashion week teach Chad Dickerson about Net Neutrality?

4. Lightning fast sandboxes

As we mentioned containers are fast. Did we mention really fast?

This can facilitate unit testing & continuous integration. A lot of shops are starting to use Jenkins for continuous integration, and fast testing is key to this process.

Also: Is automation killing old-school technical operations?

5. They work with Vagrant

Are you already using Vagrant to automate deployment of virtual environments. If so the transition is easy. Here Docker becomes your provisioner.

Mark Stratmann put together a great how to, Implementing a Vagrant / Docker Dev environment which we’d recommend you take a look at. You can also head over to the Vagrant docs themselves.

Also: Which tech do startups use most?

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Do we need another book on communicating?

supercommunicator

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I had to ask the question. There are so many books on communicating & presenting affectively, it begs the question, what can this book do that others haven’t?

While it’s a fair question, I don’t necessarily think it stands with peers. That said it’s a new book, with a new tone, preaching many of the best advice and doing it with a flair. If you’ve read a ton of communication books, you may not find something new, but if the topic is one you’re just digging into, Pietrucha is a great place to start.

1. Jobs vs Gates – inspired presentations

If you’ve ever seen these two companies CEO’s do new product demos, you’ll immediately get it. You don’t have to be an apple fanboy to appreciate how Jobs presents without buzzwords, and cuts to the heart of our hearts.

That means don’t get mired in jargon, speak to our passions, and be your own ambassador.

Also: Do managers underestimate operational costs?

2. Lead with a story & a question

In a recent discussion with a prospect I was asked about one experience that stood out over the years of consulting.

One popped into my head of a dot-com startup in the late 90′s. The company was trying to close an acquisition deal, but the web application was sick & feverish. My first few days involved conversations with lead engineers, DBA & operations team members. As I turn over more stones, I found a key component, the database, misconfigured. I sifted through configurations, and found the setup lacking. The server was using only 5% of memory. Some of the settings were even still at their default. Changing the right ones allowed the machine to flex it’s muscles like a marathon runner taken off a starvation diet. Things improved very quickly, and the site returned to a snappy responsive self.

The CEO beamed with approval, and just a few weeks later the firm was purchased for over 80 million dollars. Not bad work if you can get it. :)

Read: Which tech do startups use most?

3. Drop the vernacular & speak broadly

After recently doing some writing for muckrack on how to reach pitch journalists and then at Infoworld getting started with Amazon EC2. I’ve learned a ton. Having a professional editor explain what they want really puts things in perspective.

Editors will start by talking about their audience. If you’re a blogger, do you know who your audience is, and what they really get from your site? There may be many answers. Once you get your audience, how can you speak to all of them? In my case, I have readers who are programmers & devops, then I have CEO’s & VCs. But it doesn’t stop there. What about recruiters, and hiring managers? How about random internet searchers, and students?

All of these folks can get something from my site, and using broad language allows everyone to be within reach. Don’t sacrifice depth, but use language and stories to make your point.

Check this: 5 ways startups misstep on scalability

4. Analogies that resonate

I attend a lot of mini conferences, meetups, drinkups & social events in nyc. I find it’s one of the keys to success in consulting.

In an endless sea of conversations, you will find yourself talking about what your day-to-day business is all about. In my early years in nyc, these conversations would consist of technically correct descriptions, followed by glazed eyes, and a quick change of subject. After this happens often enough you start to wonder, how can I share such a technical description to a broader audience?

Truth is it’s only technical because you know so much about it. If I stand back I might say I’m “a sort of specialized surgeon for the internet”, or “a traffic cop of sorts, for the information highway we all share”, or better yet “a plumber, that you call when your pipes are backed up and your customers are screaming”.

Whichever analogy I use, I see eyes light up, and a look of understanding. “Oh I can see how that would be an important specialization”. Indeed.

The right analogy makes all the difference!

Related: Are startup CEO’s hiding their scalability problems?

5. Put your words on the chopping block

If you haven’t already done so, start chopping. Sentences & paragraphs all benefit from shortening & edit. Distill your big ideas in summary and let the story lend the detail. Your audience will pay closer attention, and see the big picture you are trying to share.

The guys at 37 signals do this eloquently in RE:Work .

Read this: Is Amazon RDS hard to manage?

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Is Dave Eggers right about the risks of social media?

eggers the circle

I have to admit, though Egger’s is a pretty famous author, I wasn’t familiar with his work. I do however read AVC regularly, the writing of renowned VC & Union Square Ventures partner Fred Wilson. So when one of the commenters pointed to the book as a great read I grabbed a copy on my Kindle.

Flipping through to the back of the book, the further reading section is telling. Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, DeLillo’s White Noise, Huxley’s Brave New World & Orwell’s 1984 are just a few on the list. All books that I’d read & enjoyed not only for their story, but for their cautious warning of a dystopian future.

The Circle story takes place at a fictional Silicon Valley company “The Circle”, whose campus includes wings such as Old West, Renaissance, Enlightenment, Machine Age & Industrial Revolution. The main character Mae, has just been hired in customer experience. Employees at the circle are all but *required* to socialize together. There everything is ranked, from customer satisfaction, to employee participation, comments, likes, posts & shares.

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I came away with five major themes from the book. As the characters march through the pages, watch them sacrifice their morality, free will & eventually human rights too.

1. social media is like snack food

What I loved most about the story, was how extreme the social media use had become. It was as though every moment had to be captured, every interaction “shared”. And with that, others then comment, favorite, and interact.

But as we found later, social media became something of lesser value. It was like eating snack food, a simulation of real food, missing in nutrients, but masquerading as the real thing. The metaphor holds together well, as we see people become fatigued with Facebook in the real world, and the constant sharing of everything.

Also: Is quality journalism dead? What I learned from Ryan Holiday

2. Egger’s fictional technologies are close at hand

At one point in the story, Mae does a search to find out about her family history. What turns up is more than she bargained for. It turns out that her parents had a rather odd affinity for yearly baccanalian partying, and the photos shock & embarrass Mae.

Turns out some neighbor had scanned a whole shoebox full of photos, and from there the internet crawlers took care of the rest, indexing the photos complete with facial recognition & identification. Once that was complete, a simple search revealed pictures even her parents didn’t know exist.

Facial recognition technologies in fact already exist, though are not widely used quite yet. Governments are obviously beginning to use them for law enforcement, but facebook & google are certainly getting into the act too. What’s more the SeeChange cameras described in the story, parallel Google Glass for example, which is maturing quickly.

Related: Do consultants need to balance conflicts of interest?

3. secrets are a real human need

After Mae begins wearing the SeeChange monocle, everything she does is streamed to an online audience. It begins as an exercise in transparency, but we quickly see the trouble it brings as Mae has no moments of privacy.

In this world, moments of intimacy become shorter & harder to find. And we see then how Mae begins to crave those moments, and they become more precious too.

Check this: Why Oracle won’t kill MySQL

4. monitoring changes our behavior

Much of the monitoring and transparency in the Circle story comes from a new technology called SeeChange, a camera monocle worn around the neck, perhaps paralleling Google Glass that we have all heard of.

Surveillance can surely help prevent crime, or provide evidence after the fact. But one other affect of the technology is in warping people’s natural behavior, as though we are all on a stage, all on camera all the time. In Mae’s case she begins to act for the camera, and those around her do too.

Read: Why devops talent is in short supply

5. how social media warps our sense of time & human scale

Another interesting scene occurs when Mae follows up with a friend via text. Her friend doesn’t respond back, so she sends along another text a few minutes later asking if “everything is ok”. By Mae’s fourth & fifth message, she’s sure she’s been kidnapped, and by the tenth message she’s just angry and declares their friendship is over! All this in the span of 25 minutes.

I think Eggers uses a sort of extreme example, but really to illustrate an important point. In the world of always on communication, these types of misunderstandings are more and more common. Our sense of time changes, and we may feel that others are in slow motion.

Also: Are SQL databases dead?

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5 Things Frans Johansson says about innovation

medici affect johansson

You may not have heard of Medici before, but you’ve probably heard of the renaissance. The medici family hosted the round tables, the meetups, the social gatherings & mixers. They brought diverse artisans engineers & thinkers together, and the world hasn’t been the same since!

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In the Medici Effect, Frans dissects what this famous family did. His case studies include the likes of Richard Branson, Deepak Chopra, Charles Darwin, Thomas Edison, Orit Gadiesh, Marcus Samuelsson, George Soros & our own favorite Linus Torvalds,

What he discovered really surprised me.

1. Swim at the intersection

Hanging out with folks in your field is great. Whether you’re a physician, financial analyst, Ruby programmer, or artist. But it won’t expose us to enough new ideas. To get that, you need to hang out with those in other disciplines. Learn a language, take dance classes, try your hand at a new sport, or attend meetups of wedding planners or DJs. Whatever it takes to get out of your comfort zone is what will put you at the intersection.

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

2. You need quantity to get quality

This was a very surprising finding of their research. One might think that greats like Albert Einstein were geniuses from the start. But it turns out one consistent factor between all these folks is the quantity of their attempts. They came up with many many ideas, and chased as many as they could. Of course they are only remembered for their successes, but this hides the underlying mathematics. It’s a numbers game in almost all of these cases.

Read: Are SQL Databases Dead?

3. Peel all the potatoes and cook them together

Peel one potato and cook it. Then peel another and cook it. Doesn’t sound like a recipe for efficiently preparing dinner does it? Turns out it’s also not great for innovating. Peel & prepare many ideas at once, and try to execute them in parallel if you can. That’s what these greats have done.

Related: Why generalists are better at scaling the web

4. Be ok with more failures

This is a tricky one. But Johansson puts in perspective with this key quote:

”Inaction is far worse than failure.”

Viewed that way, our caution about diving into a new idea seems more limiting. True it costs money, time & resources to pursue new ideas, ventures & startups. So be sure to reserve resources. That’s right spend that money & time carefully lest you run out before hitting on the big one.

He also says to be suspicious of low failure rates. In yourself or those you’re evaluating. This probably indicates you’re not risking enough, or trying new things constantly.

Read this: Why Oracle Won’t Kill MySQL

5. break out of your network

Your network is powerful to pursue your career, or following existing well traveled paths. But they can be an obstacle when forging new paths, which is what innovation is all about.

So break away from your networks. One way you can do this is by building a new one. But be sure to surround yourself with diverse cultures, upbringing, backgrounds & expertise.

Also: RDS or MySQL 10 Use Cases

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Lulzsec, Anonymous and the sorry state of internet security

zalgo text

If you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past few years, you might not have heard of Anonymous, the headline grabbing hacker group that’s famous for attacking citibank, ebay, Sony, the FBI, CIA and the websites of various world governments.

Parmy Olson takes us on a ride, through tales that are riveting, and quite a bit scary for what they reveal about today’s internet, and the false sense of security we all have.

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Kids these days!

By now you’ve probably heard their names T-flow, Topiary, Sabu, & Kayla. And then there was AVunit, pwnsauce, Sup_g, and Havij. Cool characters, sitting at keyboards all over the world hatching menacing attacks, and seeming more organized than they actually were…

Topiary jumped into the role as spokesman for the group. Listening to this live hack only seems amusing in retrospect, now that the group has been brought down…

Read: Why devops talent is in short supply

For all the subcultures you’ve never heard of…

Today’s internet is rife with fascinating subcultures, many I’d never heard of. Parmy’s book on Anonymous takes us to the door of all these places, and gives us a candid peak at what goes on there. Kids these days are up to no good!

The bizarro Encyclopedia Dramatica is a wikipedia of weirdness. And then there’s Googledorks, a hackers delight of exploits (ways to break into systems online), and hacks.

And let’s not forget 4Chan the online community and forum that hatched Anonymous.

You thought Ascii Art was cool, but have you heard of zalgo text? That’s the text garbling software that created this posts image.

If you’re looking to dig a little deeper, browse over to know your meme, a sort of urban dictionary for internet subcultures.

Don’t forget the 47 rules of the internet. I’m still looking for rules two through thirty three. Does this have something to do with this 33?

Read: How to evaluate an independent consultant expert

With only a very thin blanket to secure us…

If you’re not already a touch paranoid with the risks of online banking, social networks and identity theft you will be after reading this tale.

Anonymous troublemakers were able to send SWAT teams to unsuspecting people’s homes, crowd source personal information, social engineer their way to facts about someone and then dox them publishing all that personal information online.

On the more technical side, many sites are vulnerable to SQL Injection a rather technical sounding method to trick websites into dumping the contents of their databases back to a hacker. There’s even an automated tool called sqlmap to help you with the dirty work.

And then there are the very illegal denial of service attack tools like the ominous sounding low orbit ion cannon. Please don’t try this at home!

Definitely the worst of all offenders are the botnets, swarms of infected computers that can be controlled from a central location, to wreak havoc on users and internet firms alike. Thanks Bill!

As a parting word, take a quick look at this instructional video on using backtrack5, a hacking & security testing tool…

Also: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

The older roots of hacking circa 80’s and 90’s

I remember back in the 80’s when War Games came out. It was a scary premise. With the cold war between the US and the former Soviet Union in full bloom, it felt very real.

The 90’s brought Clifford Stoll hunting a hacker through his computer systems in The Cuckoo’s Egg.

And then along comes Kevin Mitnick, turning his finger up at US agents, and wreaking his own havoc in his wake.

The anonymous story turns more political when they meet the likes of Julian Assange, but even that isn’t new. Remember the Pentagon Papers?

What’s really knew is how the internet has grown, but how computers have not gotten more secure through that period. It has all grown more brittle, with many websites, and personal computers steered by unsuspecting users.

Read: Why high availability is so very hard to deliver

Surprisingly soft landing

One thing that really surprised me in this tale, was the sentences many Anons received. The way the headlines read, this was real all-out warfare on governments and corporations a like. But reading the judgements, it appears judges had a different perspective.

Although there were certainly compromises of personal information, the group really wasn’t responsible for a huge amount of theft & fraud. Sure they took down some websites, but whom does that really harm. It makes great headlines, but the bigger systems behind the scenes are actually more secure than that.

”IRC is just the crap out of everyone’s minds…” – Topiary on words thought-typed in IRC chats

After flipping through to the end, it seems we’ve taken a ride through the internet underground, but not through the criminal underworld. That is out there surely, but it’s not run by this scattered team of recluse misfits.

Related: Why Airbnb didn’t have to fail

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25 Rumsfelds Rules for Startups

RumsfeldsRules

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While we are still deep in the woods of a government shutdown, I thought it would be interesting to sum up some of our former Defense Secretary’s words of wisdom.

Rumsfeld may not have done everything right, but some of his quotes are priceless. What’s more they appeal to Startups quite nicely…

1 If you are working from your inbox, you are working on other people’s priorities.

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2 Men count up the faults of those who keep them waiting.

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3 In unanimity, there may well be either cowardice or uncritical thinking.

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4 Test ideas in the marketplace. You learn from hearing a range of perspectives.

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5. You can’t recover a fumble unless you’re on the field. Get out there.

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Read this: Why the Twitter IPO mentioned scalability

6. First law of holes. If you get in one, stop digging.

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7. Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.

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8. You pay the same price for doing something halfway as for doing it completely so you might as well do it completely.

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9. It is difficulties that show what men are.

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10. What you measure, improves.

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Also: Why I don’t work with recruiters

11. If you are lost, “climb, conserve and confess”

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12. It is not the strongest species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

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13. Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

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14. People don’t spend money earned by others with the same care that they spend their own.

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15. Disagreement is not disloyalty.

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Related: Why a CTO must never do this

16. A lie travels halfway around the world before the truth gets its shoes on.

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17. It is easier to convince someone they’re right, than to convince them they’re wrong.

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18. Your best question is often why.

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19. Simply because a problem is shown to exist, it doesn’t necessarily follow that there is a solution.

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20. The world is run by those who show up.

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Read: Who is Sean Hull?

21. Don’t panic. Things may be going better than they seem from the inside.

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22. Know that the amount of criticism you receive may correlate closely to the amount of publicity you get.

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23. Sunshine is a weather report, a flood is news.

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24. If you expect people to be in on the landing, include them in the takeoff.

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25. If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.

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Read this: Why a killer title can make or break your content efforts

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30 Days of Aspirin for your Ailing Management Headaches

Take Two & Call Me In the Morning

I like a book like Gerry Czarnecki’s even if I can’t pronounce his name. He’s laid out things for readers, a very busy bunch who are going to have trouble finding time in their day to read, but can sorely use the advice. Organized into 30 daily bites of probably 15-20 minutes, you can dig through on your commute to work, or on your lunch break.

Also check out Who Moved My Cheese a business self-help classic.

Czarnecki should know. As a 2nd Army Lieutenant then later heading up board of directors at organizations large and small he’s seen a lot. He digs up the best stories, and offers up lessons straight out of his experiences.

[quote]
On interviews – Be careful that you do not let the resume dominate your conversation. You will gain better insight if you listen to what the candidates want to talk about or what they think you want to talk about. – Gerry Czarnecki
[/quote]

Some of the topics you’ll touch on…

o dealing with mistaken hires that don’t work out
o finding a mentor
o career moves & pivots
o setting expectations with new hires
o hitting peak performance
o filling your bus with rock stars

For startups an all-time favorite of mine is REWORK – 37 Signals guys. These guys have taken the lean methodology and built a real business by being efficient. The pages resonate for me as a small business owner. I’ve found many of the same lessons work in the real world for me.

[mytweetlinks]

Also read
Thank you for arguing by Jay Heinrichs
. With some of the best advice on rhetoric, sales, presentations & persuasion, I re-read bits of the book often.

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Tech Print Isn't Dead – Bloomberg Businessweek

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I usually review a book. But this time I thought I’d trumpet about the best weekly going right now. Nope it’s not a blog, not Wired or any of the other tech mag.

It’s the upstart Bloomberg Businessweek which got a major overhaul a couple years back by
creative director Josh Tyrangiel formerly of the Guardian.

Check out: Why Generalists Are Better at Scaling the Web

The covers are controversial and grab your attention, and the copy is top notch. It’s like reading the economist but with more tech & business heavy content. Work lifestyle articles, back-to-back with business book reviews as haiku? A solid dose of business & tech trends, startups, entrepreneurs and innovation. It’s all here.

Also: What Wouldn’t Google Do?.

If you’re looking for a good read, get a subscription right now.

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MySQL for Devs, DBAs and Debutantes

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I just received my copy of the 5th Edition of Paul DuBois’ MySQL tomb. Weighing in at 1153 pages, it’s a solid text, with a very thorough introduction to the topic of administering MySQL databases.

Buy the book here: MySQL 5th Edition by Paul Dubois

A book for a broad audience

When I say debutantes, it’s a nod to beginners, for this book forges a very solid and complete introduction to the topic of MySQL. Start with installing the software & setting up your environment, and then move on to really understanding the SQL language, from commands to create objects, to ones for adding & modifying data, and then writing code around it.

See also: 5 more things deadly to Scalability

There’s a thorough discussion of datatypes, stored procedures, functions and views.

[quote]
Paul Dubois’ definitive reference makes a excellent compliment to High Performance MySQL. They should sit alongside eachother on your database bookshelf.
[/quote]

For developers there are chapters on writing applications in C, another for Perl and a third for PHP.

For DBAs there are chapters on security, backups, replication, understanding the data directory and general server administration. There is also good coverage of both 5.5 and the newly released 5.6 of MySQL.

What I like about this book

You can think of this book as a definitive reference to MySQL. It includes much of the online documentation that you would find at Oracle’s site, such as command & variable reference, and detailed explanation of how to use the client tools.

Dubois also goes beyond the online documentation though, giving you a bit of a background around concepts, a broader more complete discussion.

Read this: Two Part DBA Interview Guide for Managers & Candidates alike

He also lays out the material in a very logical stepwise way, so for someone new to the MySQL world and the time on their hands, the 1153 pages could be read straight through.

Why No Mention of Percona Toolkit?

I have to admit I was a bit surprised there was no mention of Percona Toolkit. Perhaps it was buried in some dark corner of the text I missed, but it made no mention in the index at all.

Percona Toolkit of course is a tool that every DBA should be familiar with. It is really an essential toolkit and fills the gaps that the prepackaged tools can’t help you with.

Want to checksum your tables to compare data on master & slave? pt-table-checksum does the trick.

Check this: AirBNB didn’t have to fail during the Amazon AWS Outage

Want to find out how far your slaves *really* are behind? pt-heartbeat is your friend.

Want to analyze your slow query log to produce a useful summary report? pt-query-digest to the rescue.

I also see no mention of innotop, which I would also say is an essential tool. These aren’t really advanced topics, so It’s unclear why they are missing. In the real world you need these tools to do your job.

Other Criticisms

My more general criticism is where the book lacks real-world advice from a seasoned DBA. At times the writing feels a bit more of the official line on how things work. But in day-to-day devops and operations, things can be quite different.

Also: Bulletproofing MySQL Replication with Checksums

For example, stored procedures. In MySQL they are there, however using them brings real performance challenges. They’re not always compatible with replication. Given all of that, why include a whole chapter with endless discussion of them without strong reservations. It would lead a novice user or developer to incorporate them into an application only to be shocked and surprised at the problems they bring.

Another example, looking through the system variables reference, I see the sync_binlog option. There is a short caution “…lower values provide greater safety in the event of a crash, but also affect performance more adversely”. Now reading this as a novice DBA I might think great, crash protection. But having tried this parameter in production, I found a huge impact on performance and had to disable it. What’s the advice here? It’s a bit confusing.

Conclusions

This is a really great book as an introduction to MySQL, and delving into intermediate topics. I would sit it on your bookshelf along side High Performance MySQL. What this book lacks in advice, you can turn to the latter book, and what High Performance MySQL lacks in terms of introductory material this book covers in spades. They make a great compliment to each other.

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The Needle in Big Data Noise

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Also take a look at: I hacked Disqus Digests to discover new blogs

Who the heck is Bayes

Thomas Bayes was a scientist & thinker, Fellow of the Royal Society, and back in 1763 author of “An Essay toward Solving a Problem in the Doctrine of Chances”. His method advocated learning by approximation, to get closer and closer to the truth by gathering more information, and factoring that into probabilities & predictions.

[quote]
What isn’t acceptable under Bayes’s theorem is to pretend that you don’t have any prior beliefs. You should work to reduce your biases, but to say you have none is a sign that you have many.
[/quote]

Why should you care?

From hurricane & earthquake warnings, to financial storms or terrorism, prediction is more important than ever. Epidemiologists can make use of Bayesian techniques to protect populations, gamblers can use it in sport, and investors for markets.

See also Amp up your blog traffic by improving your pagerank

Why Nate Silver is different

Nate is famous for predicting the 2012 presidential election with uncanny accuracy. So the book is an in depth look at how he thinks, and how he works with data. He talks of Hedgehogs – those who believe in big ideas and work from large principals, versus Foxes who see the world as messy, often inconsistent and unpredictable, but who nevertheless tend to present better though less definitive predictions. The philosophy is less of modeling, and more of testing, and adjusting along the way to get closer to the truth.

See also Sales sucks, but a bear market offers hard lessons

For engineers & startups

Nate interviewed John Sanders of a scout for the LA Dodgers. He identified five abilities and characteristics that predict success in baseball. Looking at them together, I think they can well predict success in Startup land too.

1. Preparedness & work ethic
2. Concentration & focus
3. Competitiveness & self-confidence
4. Stress management & humility
5. Adaptiveness & learning ability

The book is a bit technical and sometimes long winded. But it is choc full of real insight, and wisdom that we can all put to use in our careers and businesses.

Also: AirBNB didn’t have to fail – AWS outages be damned!

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