Category Archives: Database Operations

No tools to reconcile MySQL with two masters

Here’s the last nail in the coffin. We hope this convinces you not to write to multiple masters with MySQL replication.

Reason 10 – No tools to reconcile inconsistent masters

For all the endless reasons we’ve already outlined MySQL replication is prone to failure. We know it’s going to happen, you now know too.

When replication breaks, your application may still be writing to both sides, both masters. Now you have data differences on both sides, random rows, in random tables.

Percona Toolkit checksum tool is great when you have a single authoritative master. It can compare & show you diffs. But when you’ve changed two masters, you have no authoritative side. Neither one is the last word on your data. You’re then faced with an intractable problem of reconciling your data in some manual or do-it-yourself method.

Not only would such a scenario be hairy and prone to error, but you would effectively have an outage for the duration. All ugly scenarios to be sure.

Click through to the end for multi-master solutions that work with MySQL.

PREV: Reason 9 – Temp tables can break replication

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Temp tables can break replication

If you’re not convinced yet that writing to dual masters is a bad idea, we have a couple more reasons.

9. Temp tables break replication after restart

MySQL’s replication is sensitive to temporary tables. You shouldn’t use them. If your queries create them to work against, and a node crashes, the temp tables will be missing upon restart. You can imagine what this will do to all those queries which expect to see a temp table. That’s right, they’ll fail.

Theoretically you could have a start script which creates and populates such temp tables. However this may add operational complexity if not carefully coordinated with developers & change management.

NEXT: Reason 10 – No tools to reconcile inconsistent masters

PREV: Reason 8 – Crashed nodes can corrupt your cluster

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Crashed nodes corrupt your MySQL cluster

Writing to two masters is like walking around with a loaded shotgun. Eventually one of your instances will fail and when it does, replications position & synchronization information could easily become corrupt!

Reason 8 – Crashed nodes cause big problems

MySQL instances, unfortunately can crash. When that happens, they don’t always sync the replication position properly. That’s a big risk. It’s one of the reasons why operational DBAs know that replication slaves need to be rebuilt from time to time.

If the replication position doesn’t sync properly when MySQL restarts it may do so at the wrong position and replay or miss some transactions. What this would do to an active-active setup is unpredictable. Again no single authoritative master means trouble!

MySQL 5.5 has introduced some parameters to address this. During my tests I’ve seen a performance hit, so use them with caution.

[code]
sync_binlog
sync_relay_log
sync_master_info
sync_relay_log_info
[/code]

NEXT: Reason 9 – Crashed nodes cause big problems

PREV: Reason 7 – Can’t add third node easily

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10 reaons active-active is hard and how to solve it

Multi-master replication provides redundant copies of your most important business assets. What’s more it allows applications to scale out, which is perfect for cloud hosting solutions like Amazon Web Services.

But when you decide you need to scale your write capacity, you may be considering active-active setup. This is dangerous, messy and prone to failure. We’ve outlined how.

Click through to the end for multi-master solutions that work with MySQL.

Reason 1 – auto_increment introduces new problems

o MySQL’s auto_inc settings make it more difficult to change servers around in your overall replication topology

o Using auto_inc settings can cause MySQL to introducing gaps in your primary keys which is a waste of space

o Such a solution would require all tables to have auto_inc primary keys

NEXT: Reason 2 – MySQL replication is brittle to start with

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The Art of Resistance

Sometimes, you have to be the bad guy. Be resistant to change. Here’s a story about how stubbornness pays off. As we’ve written about before A 4 letter word divides Dev & Ops.

I had one experience working as the primary MySQL DBA for an internet startup. Turns out they had Oracle for some applications too. And another DBA just to handle the Oracle stuff.

So it came time for Oracle guy to go on vacation. Suddenly these Oracle systems landed on my shoulders. We reviewed everything in advance, then he bid his goodbyes.

Almost as soon as he was out the door I started getting requests to change things.
“Oh we have to add this field”, or “oh we’d like to make this table change”.

I resisted enough to hold off development for a week.

“We’re now getting more heat from the CTO. Apparently certain pages on the site don’t save some very important content properly. It’s costing the business a lot of money. We need to make this change.”

My response –

[quote]No I can’t sanction this. If you want to do it, understand that it could well break Oracle’s replication.[/quote]

Oracle’s multi-master replication notoriously requires a lot of baby sitting. We held off for a few more days, and the Oracle DBA returned from his much needed vacation.

When discussing it afterward he said…

[quote]Am very glad you didn’t change those fields in the database. It would indeed have broken replication and caused problems with the backups![/quote]

Moral of the story…

  • apply the brakes around tight turns
  • don’t be afraid to say, we’re not going to do this before testing
  • you may have to say – we’re not going to do this at all…

A History lesson for Cloud Detractors

Computing history

We’ve all seen cloud computing discussed ad nauseam on blogs, on Twitter, Quora, Stack Exchange, your mom’s Facebook page… you get the idea. The tech bloggers and performance experts often pipe in with their graphs and statistics showing clearly that dollar-for-dollar, cloud hosted virtual servers can’t compete with physical servers in performance, so why is everyone pushing them? It’s just foolhardy, they say.

On the other end, management and their bean counters would simply roll their eyes saying this is why the tech guys aren’t running the business.

Seriously, why the disconnect? Open source has always involved a lot of bushwacking…

Continue reading A History lesson for Cloud Detractors

What Ops doesn’t tell you about your MySQL Database

MySQL is a very scalable platform which has proven robust even in the most dense and complex data environments. MySQL’s indispensable replication function is ‘sold’ as being fail-safe so you have little to sweat about as long as your backups are running regularly. But what the ops guys aren’t telling you is MySQL performs replication with tiny margins of error that could cause big problems in times of disaster.

Replication database backup

The Scenario

Imagine the scene, you use replication to backup your data. Your secondary database is your peace of mind. It’s the always-on clone of your crown jewels. You even perform backups off of it so you don’t impact your live website. Your backups run without errors. Your slave database runs without errors. Then the dreaded day comes when your primary database fails. You instruct your team to switchover your application to point to your live backup database. The site comes online again. But all is not right. You notice subtle differences and your team begins to question how deep the data divide could be.

The Problem with MySQL replication

Although MySQL replication is fairly easy to setup, and even to keep running without error, you may have unseen problems. MySQL’s core technology to replicate data between master and slave is primarily statement based. Various scenarios can cause what in other database platforms you might call database corruption, that is silent drifting of data from what tables and rows contain on the master. It is no fault of your own, or perhaps one might argue even of your operations team. It is a fundamental flaw in how MySQL performs replication.

The Solution

Fortunately there is a solution. Checksums, the wonderful computational tool for comparing things can be put to work nicely to compare database. The Percona Toolkit (formerly maatkit) includes just such a utility for use with MySQL. It can be used to check the integrity of your slave databases.
If you’ve never performed such a check, you should do so ASAP. If your database has been running for months at a stretch, chances are there could be differences lying undiscovered between the two systems.

Depending on the volume changing in your database, you can continue to use this tool periodically to confirm that all is consistent. If integrity checks fail, there is another tool in Maatkit to syncronize differences, and bring everything back to order.

Book Review – Effective MySQL

Effective MySQL: Optimizing SQL Statements

by Ronald Bradford

No Nonsense, Readable, Practical, and Compact

Effective MySQLI like that this book is small; 150 pages means you can carry it easily.  It’s also very no nonsense.  It does not dig too deeply into theory unless it directly relates to your day-to-day needs.  And those needs probably cluster heavily around optimizing SQL queries, as those pesky developers are always breaking things 😉

Jokes aside, this new book out on Oracle Press is a very readable volume. Bradford has drawn directly from real-world experience to give you the right bite size morsels you need in your day-to-day MySQL activities. Continue reading Book Review – Effective MySQL

Oracle Announces Paid MySQL Add-ons

 Oracle starts charging for MySQL Add-ons

Exciting news, Oracle just announced commercial MySQL extensions that they’ll be offering paid extensions to the core MySQL free product.

To be sure, this has raised waves of concern among the community, but on the whole I suspect it will be a good thing for MySQL.  This brings more commercial addons to the table, which only increases the options for customers.  Many will continue to use the core database product only, and avoid license hassles while others will surely embark on a hybrid approach if it solves their everyday business problems. Continue reading Oracle Announces Paid MySQL Add-ons

3 Biggest MySQL Migration Surprises

3 ways your MySQL migration project can shake you up

Once a development or operations team gets over the hurdle of open-source, and start to feel comfortable with the way software works outside of the enterprise world, they will likely start to settle in and feel comfortable.  Best not to get too cushy though for there are more surprises hiding around the corner.  Here are a few of the biggest ones. Continue reading 3 Biggest MySQL Migration Surprises