Category Archives: Redshift

How to build an operational datastore on AWS with S3 & Redshift

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You’re building your data warehouse, and getting data into Redshift. You’ve got your ETL pipeline running, and presentation layer talking to the warehouse. Great.

But how to get access to that source data? Wouldn’t it be nice if that was close by too?

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It may be you have 10-zillion rows of source data and don’t want or need to get all of that into Redshift and keep it there. But it would be nice to have access to it when you do.

Enter EXTERNAL tables, aka Spectrum. Now you can keep all your raw data in S3, an in place operational datastore of data before it’s been reworked and transformed. Use SQL to access it right where it sits.

Get all the advantages of lifecycle management in S3, and don’t pay all the redshift costs for data you don’t need all the time. Cool!

Let’s see how it works.

What is an EXTERNAL table?

Spectrum is Amazon’s rebranding of an old database technology called EXTERNAL TABLES. Back in the 90’s Oracle pioneered this work, allowing you to essentially map a CSV file, that sits outside the database proper. This means you can query all that juicy data sitting in flat files. Cool!

Athena allows you to query this stuff as a service, native to AWS. Spectrum allows you to create those external tables inside of Redshift.

Also: Top serverless interview questions for hiring aws lambda experts

Give Redshift permissions

Go into IAM and create a new role called “SeanSpectrumRole”. Assign the policy AmazonS3ReadOnlyPolicy. It looks like this:


{
"Version": "2012-10-17",
"Statement": [
{
"Effect": "Allow",
"Action": [
"s3:Get*",
"s3:List*"
],
"Resource": "*"
}
]
}

If you’re using the dashboard you just pick the policy from the named list. However if you’re using CloudFormation, you’ll use the code above.

Now navigate your aws console to the Redshift dashboard, click clusters, and click the checkbox for your cluster. Probably there’s only one.

Now click the “Manage IAM Roles” button, and a dialog should popup.. Select the role you created earlier, SeanSpectrumRole. Then click “Apply Changes”.

The beauty of the AWS world is that servers themselves can have API permissions. In this case we gave the redshift cluster or server itself, access to S3 for our use below!

Related: Which engineering roles are in greatest demand?

Create your spectrum schema

First you must create a spectrum schema. Here’s the syntax:


create external schema spectrum
from data catalog
database 'sean'
region 'us-east-1'
iam_role 'arn:aws:iam::9999999999999:role/SeanSpectrumRole';

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Upload your data to S3 bucket

Here we create an s3 bucket called sean_spectrum, then upload one csv file named sean_numbers.txt.


$ aws s3api create-bucket --bucket sean_spectrum --region us-east-1
{
"Location": "/sean_spectrum"
}
$ cd spectrum/
$ cat sean_numbers.txt
21,Dr.,Who,44-22-55-77-88
35,Bat,Man,317-222-4777
15,Wonder,Woman,999-324-7878
99,Storm,Cloud,367-399-6767
75,Marvel,Girl,222-333-9595
32,Quick,Silver,22-33-77-99
12,Scarlet,Witch,23-35-47-555
$ aws s3 cp sean_numbers.txt s3://sean_spectrum/
upload: ./sean_numbers.txt to s3://sean_spectrum/sean_numbers.txt
$ aws s3 ls s3://sean_spectrum/
2017-05-18 20:28:41 193 sean_numbers.txt
$

Note the names. The table name won’t turn out to be sean_numbers. It will be called sean_spectrum, and all files inside that directory will be queried. So make sure they have consistent formats!

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Create & query your external table

Here’s how you create your external table. Note this is just a map to data. The data is still stored in S3. it is not brought into Redshift except to slice, dice & present.


mydb=# create external table spectrum_schema.sean_numbers(
id int,
fname string,
lname string,
phone string)
row format delimited
fields terminated by ','
stored as textfile
location 's3://sean_spectrum/';

Here’s how you query it:


mydb=# select * from spectrum_schema.sean_numbers order by id;
id | fname | lname | phone
----------------+---------------
12 | Scarlet | Witch | 23-35-47-555
15 | Wonder | Woman | 999-324-7878
21 | Dr. | Who | 44-22-55-77-88
32 | Quick | Silver | 22-33-77-99
35 | Bat | Man | 317-222-4777
75 | Marvel | Girl | 222-333-9595
99 | Storm | Cloud | 367-399-6767

Cool. We reordered data read from an S3 file!!!

Although you can’t create a view over a redshift table *AND* an S3 external table, you can query them together.

So for example if I have a table in redshift with addresses, I can join them together:

mydb=# select a.id, a.fname, a.lname, b.address from spectrum_schema.sean_numbers a, sean_addresses b
where a.id = b.id order by id;

id | fname | lname | phone | address
----------------+----------------------------
12 | Scarlet | Witch | 23-35-47-555 | 10 main st
15 | Wonder | Woman | 999-324-7878 | 25 center st
21 | Dr. | Who | 44-22-55-77-88 | 32 broadway
32 | Quick | Silver | 22-33-77-99 | 1 first st
35 | Bat | Man | 317-222-4777 | 99 west st
75 | Marvel | Girl | 222-333-9595 | 66 East Ave
99 | Storm | Cloud | 367-399-6767 | 50 North st

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A roughneck walk down database alley

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I was just responding to some Disqus comments on a recent blog post. Admittedly it had a provocative title Will SQL databases just die already. What do you think?

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A reader pointed out that some No-SQL databases do support joins. Huh? My face contorts in total confusion. How? Why?

For years SQL was misunderstood & unloved

Relational databases have been around for decades. 43 years according to the StackExchange article. That’s a lot of years. I’ve spent a few years as a dba, aka database administrator. The role can be distilled down as a herder of sorts. Keep all the data bits in the right boxes with the right labels. A digital librarian, that makes sure the books don’t get lost.

Of course patrons don’t always put books back where they should, and strict rules get put in place to avoid losing that one volume of shakespear in miles of shelves.

In the fast moving world of web + mobile, product is king, and agile rules the day. And anything that can make us more agile also wins. SQL, much maligned & misunderstood, was not one of those things.

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NoSQL burst on the scene with much fanfare

With all that pressure, it was no wonder engineers thought, there must be a better way. Then along comes the No SQL database. I mean just the name speaks volumes about the design goal.

We’ll sacrifice anything, just please don’t make me write SQL!

The promises…

1. Never have to deal with pesky SQL that we don’t understand!
2. Interact with the database like any other data structure in our code!
3. Be schemaless! Crotchety Database Administrators be damned!
4. Be distributed. Be everywhere consistent! Be indistinguishable from magic!
5. Always be fast.

In that rush into the abyss, we lost track of durability. And down the rabbithole we went!

Related: Which engineering roles are in greatest demand?

Relational databases tried to be key-value

Then I started hearing about crazy things, like MySQL providing a memcache plugin, so you could use it albeit lightening fast, as a key-value store. You could sidestep that pesky SQL engine, and get right down to the bare metal. But why? Memcache & Redis were already doing that & purpose built. Why indeed?

I started to argue maybe we shouldn’t be muddying the waters. I mean stick with what you know!

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War was won, success declared

Around this I think was when Mongodb was declaring the war won. We had finally left SQL databases in the dustheap of history. It may or may not have inspired this popular youtube skit…

Also: 30 questions to ask a serverless fanboy

Meanwhile hadoop is losing ground. Bigquery & Redshift both speak SQL

But then something funny started to happen. It seemed there was a backlash against Mongodb. A lot of customers were losing data. (Yep that’s what durability means guys…) And the hype started reversing. Even the mighty hadoop has been losing popularity of late. How long does it take to write an EMR job versus an SQL query. Let’s be honest?

I asked myself, Is Hadoop losing ground to SQL warehouses like Redshift & Bigquery?. I wonder.

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NoSQL databases are looking for JOINs?

Recently I bumped into some interesting blog comments & discussions about how Orientdb was trying to add joins to their product.

As certain relational databases try to become No SQL databases, other No SQL databases are trying to add more complex SQL, because well somehow their product is missing something.

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Engineering truth versus fashion

43 years is a lot of years. And when we drop all the fashion trends in tech, and the new database du jour, what do we find?

There is room for No SQL databases. Yep. And the do certain things, and solve certain types of problems well. But their not general workhorses, nor can they slice and dice your data however you like. And when you get to that point in your project, you’re going to want to ask interesting questions of your data.

And surely that’s where SQL excels. It ain’t going anywhere, folks!

Also: What can startups learn from the DYN DNS outage?

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What products & improvements are new on AWS?

Amazon is releasing new products & services to it’s global cloud compute network at a rate that has all of our heads spinning.

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Here’s new stuff worth mentioning around databases & data.

1. For ETL – AWS GLUE

Moving data from your transactional MySQL or Arora database to your reporting database isn’t always easy.

In the past you could use a service like xplenty or Alooma.

Now Amazon themselves are getting into the ETL game, providing a new service called Glue.

Also: RDS or Mysql? 10 use cases

2. Query S3 with Athena

Chances are if you’re using AWS for anything, you’ve got data in S3. And wouldn’t it be nice to pick that apart and dig through it, where it sits?

Oracle had a feature called “external tables” and MySQL had something similar. Now Amazon is offering that native within it’s own cloud universe. Thanks to some tricky lambda code, now you can do that. Don’t worry how they did it, because it’s been packaged into a nice easy service for your use!

Related: When you have to take the fall – consulting war stories

3. Business Intelligence with QuickSight

If you’re a data driven startup, and who isn’t these days, you’re going to have a business unit building reports. Tableau or Looker may be in your wheelhouse.

Amazon is obviously seeing the opportunity here, and competing with their own partners. Check out Amazon Quicksight for details.

Read: Is upgrading RDS like a sh*t storm that will not end?

4. Expanded RDS

RDS is obviously a very popular offering. And even though zero downtime is very hard to achieve with RDS, you’ll save plenty on DBAs and admins you don’t have to hire!

If you hadn’t heard, there is now MariaDB support. And with it, there’s a migration from MySQL to Mariadb as well.

Using Mariadb may bring you performance advantages & improvements. But RDS may mitigate this by productize & standarizing things.

You can also now move encrypted snapshots across regions. In my view this isn’t really a new feature, but rather fixing something that was broken before. The previous limitation was really more a symptom of their global network of data centers, than any built feature per se.

Also: Is the difference between dev & ops a four-letter word?

5. Expanded Redshift

As I’ve blogged before, everybody is excited about Redshift these days.

Amazon has introduced some new features.

o better loading of sorted data

This is done behind the scenes to load data quickly, and keep it stored efficiently. No more vacuuming after a big load!

o user & database rate limiting

Limit connections on a per user or per database level. Useful!

o storage estimates on analyze

When you perform the analyze command, you can get storage information so it’s easier to decide datatypes & compression type. Nifty!

Also: Is Redshift outpacing Hadoop as the big data warehouse for startups?

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5 essential tools for Redshift DBA’s

redshift dba tools

Like every other startup, you’ve built everything on AWS or are moving there quickly.

So it makes sense & is an easy win to build your analytics & bigdata engine on AWS too. Enter Redshift to the rescue.

Unlike the old days of Oracle where you had career DBAs to handle your data & hold the keys to the data kingdom, these days nobody is managing the data. What makes matters worse is the documentation is weak, and it hasn’t been out long enough to warrant good books on the topic.

But there’s hope!

Here are five great tools to help you in your day-to-day management of Redshift

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The Github Redshift Utils Page has the whole package, while I link to individual scripts below.

1. Slow queries

Just like MySQL, Postgres & Oracle, your database performance & responsiveness lives & dies by the SQL that you write. And just like all those databases, you want to look at the slowest queries, to know where to tune. Spend your time on the worst offenders first.

Redshift Slow Queries Report.

Also: 5 Ways to get data into REdshift

2. Fragmented Tables

You add data, you delete data. And just like all the other relational databases we know & love, this process leaves gaps. New data is still added at the high water mark, and full table scans still read those empty blocks.

The solution is the vacuum command, but which tables should we run it on?

Run this script & find out which tables need maintenance.

Redshift Display tables needing vacuum

Related: Is Redshift outpacing Hadoop for Startups & bigdata

3. Analyze Schema Compression

Getting your schema compression right on your data in Redshift turns out to be essential to performance too. Each datatype has a recommended compression type that works best for it. You can let Redshift decide when it first loads data, but it doesn’t always guess correctly.

This tool will help you analyze your data, and set compression types properly.

Redshift analyze schema compression tool

Read: 5 Reasons to move data to Amazon Redshift

4. Audit Users

Once you have your Redshift cluster up & running, you’ll setup users for applications to connect as. Each will have different privileges for objects & schemas in your database. You’re auditing those right? 🙂

This script will output who can read & write what. Useful to ensure your application isn’t overly loose with permissions. Shoot for least privileges where possible.

Redshift Audit User Privileges.

Redshift Audit Table Privileges

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5. Lambda Data Loader

Want to automatically load data into Redshift? Download this handy Lambda based tool to respond to S3 events. Whenever a new file appears, it’s data will get loaded into Redshift. Complete with metadata configuration control in Dynamodb.

Redshift Lambda Data Loader

Also: Why is everybody suddenly talking about Amazon Redshift?

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Five ways to get your data into Redshift

redshift data pipeline

Everybody is hot under the collar this data over Redshift. I heard one customer say, a query that took 10 Hours before now finishes in under a minute. Without modification. When businesses see 600 times speedup, that can change the way they do business.

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What’s more Redshift is easy to deploy. No complicated licenses like the Oracle days. No hardware, just create your cluster & go.

So you’ve made the decision, and you have data in your transactional database, MySQL RDS or Postgres. Now what?

Here are some systems that will help you synchronize data on the regular. And keep it in sync. Most of these are near real-time, so you can expect reports to be looking at the data your business created today.

1. RJ Metrics Pipeline

One of the simplest options, RJ Metrics Pipeline. Setup a trial account, configure your Redshift credentials in the warehouse section (port, user, password, endpoint) and save. Then configure your data source. For MySQL specify hostname, user, password & port. You get the option to go through an ssh tunnel for security. That’s good. You’ll also be given the grant code to create a user in MySQL for RJM.

rjmetrics table config screen

RJM uses a primary or unique key to figure out which rows have changed. Well that’s not completely true. Only if you’re using incremental refresh. If you’re using complete refresh, then it just selects all the data & replaces it each time.

The user interface is a bit clunky. You have to go in and CONFIGURE EACH TABLE you want to replicate. There’s no REPLICATE-ALL option. This is a pain. If you have 500 tables, it might take hours to configure them all.

Also since RJM isn’t CDC (change data capture) based, it won’t be as close to real-time as some of the other options.

Still RJM works and it’s pretty point-n-click.

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2. xplenty

xplenty is really a lot more than just a sync tool. It’s a full featured ETL system. Want to avoid writing tons of python jobs to convert datatypes, transform 0 to paid & 1 to free, things like that? Well xplenty is made to allow building ETL systems without code.

xplenty main dashboard

It’s a bit complex to setup at first, but very full featured. It is the DIY developer or DBAs tool of the bunch. If you need hardcore functionality, xplenty seems to have it.

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Is Data your dirty little secret?

3. Alooma

Alooma might possibly be the most interesting of the bunch.

After a few stumbles during the setup process, we managed to get this up and running smoothly. Again as with xplenty & Fivetran, it uses CDC to grab changes from the MySQL binlogs. That means you get near realtime.

alooma dashboard

Although it’s a bit more complex to setup than Fivetran, it gives you a lot more. There’s excellent visibility around data errors, which you *will* have. Knowing where they happen, means your data team can be very proactive. This is great for the business.

What’s more there is a python based Code Engine which allows you to write bits of code that transform data in the pipeline. That’s huge! Want to do some simple ETL, this is a way to do that. Also you can send notifications, or requeue events. All this means you get state of the art pipeline, with good configurability & logging.

Read: Is aws a patient that needs constant medication?

4. Fivetran

Fivetran is super point-n-click. It is CDC based like Flydata & Alooma, so you’re gonna get near realtime sync with low overhead. It monitors your binlogs for changed data, and ships it to Redshift. No mess.

The dashboard is simple, the setup is trivial, and it just seems to work. Least pain, best bang.

Related: Does Amazon eat it’s own dogfood?

5. Other options

There are lots of other ways to get data into Redshift.

Flydata

I did manage to get Flydata working at a customer last year. It’s a very viable option. I wrote at length about that solution I’ll leave you to read all about it there.

AWS Data Pipeline

I’ve started to kick the tires of AWS Data Pipeline but haven’t decided if it’s the best option for customers.

Nightly rebuild

The Donors Choose Tech Blog posted about their project which can move data from postgres to redshift. You can find the project here.

This will do a *full* reload each night, so if your db is too big for that, it might need modifications. Also if you’re using MySQL as source db you’ll need to change code. One thing I found in there was Perl & Sed commands to transform your source schema CREATE & ALTER statements into Redshift compatible ones. That in itself is worth a look.

Lambda to the rescue

The awslabs github team has put together a lambda-based redshift loader. This might be just what you need. Remember thought that’ll you’ll need to deliver your source data in CSV files to S3 on the regular. So you’ll need some method to dump it. But if you have that half of the equation, this is ideal.

Data Migration Serve or DMS

This appears to have supported Redshift early on, but does not appear to do so now. I’ve gotten conflicting reports, so I should dig a bit more. Anybody want to comment on this one?

Tungsten

I tried & tried & tried to get Tungsten to work. I did have some success but was still blocked by data problems which remained unresolved. To my mind the project is still broken or at least very buggy.

Also: Is AWS too complex for small dev teams?

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Why is everyone suddenly talking about Amazon Redshift?

par accel redshift

It seems like all I hear these days is Redshift, Redshift, Redshift!

I met up with a recruiter today. We talked about this & that. The usual. Then when he came to the topic of technology he said,

“yeah it seems as though suddenly everybody is looking for Redshift & Snowflake”

As I blogged about before, I don’t work with recruiters, I learn a lot from them.

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Luckily I got to cut my teeth on Redshift about a year ago. I was senior database engineer managing Amazon & MySQL RDS, and they wanted to build a data warehouse. Bingo!

Here’s the big takeaway from my discussion today. Recruiters have their fingers on the pulse!

1. We need an Amazon expert

Here’s what else I’m hearing everywhere. “We’re migrating to AWS, can you help?” Complexity & confusion around the new virtual networking, moving into the cloud, and tuning applications & components to get the same performance as before. All of these are real & present needs for firms.

Related: Is data your dirty little secret?

2. We need a Redshift expert

Amazon bought Par Accel, a bleedingly fast warehouse. It uses SQL. It looks like Postgres, and handles petabytes. You read that petabytes! It’s so good in fact that it seems a lot of folks are now dumping Hadoop.

Incredible as that sounds, Redshift is delivering *that* kind of speed on that kind of big data. Wow! What’s more you skip the whole Hadoop cycle of write, test, debug, schedule job, fix bugs, and stir. With SQL you bring back the iterative agile process!

Read: 5 cloud challenges I’m thinking about today

3. We need a Hadoop expert

Ok, for those enterprises who aren’t sold on Redshift yet, there is still a ton of Hadoop out there. And for good reason.

Apache Spark is also getting really big now too. It’s an easier to manage successor to Hadoop, based around much of the same concepts.

Also: 5 core pieces of the Amazon cloud puzzle to get your project off the ground

4. We need strong Python skills

Python is everywhere. Amazon’s command line interface is python based. You see it everywhere. If it’s not in your wheelhouse get it there!

Also: Why Dropbox didn’t have to fail

5. We need communicators

Another interesting thing the recruiter said

“I was surprised & a little shocked that you suggested we meet for coffee. Most developers are hard to get out to have a conversation with.”

Good communicators are as in-demand as ever! Being able to and happy to talk with people who aren’t deeply technical, and distill complex technical jargon into plain english. And do that with a smile too & enjoy it?

That’s special!

Also: Should we be muddying the waters? Use cases for MySQL & Mongodb

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Is data your dirty little secret?

data comparison cloud

While I was fumbling for the dictionary to figure out what polyglot persistence was, the CTO had decided to build a warehouse on Redshift.

“Everybody’s moving data there.” He declared. I looked on quizzically.

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“That’s a very new database engine”, I chimed in. “Lets do some testing”.

And there began an adventurous ride into the bleeding edge of Amazon’s new data service offerings!

1. The data scientist comes crying

Are our transactional database we were using Amazon RDS for MySQL. It’s a great managed service that eliminates some of the headaches of doing it yourself. I wrote about thisRDS or MySQL Use Cases.

We needed some way to get data over to Redshift. We evaluated AWS Data Pipeline, but it wasn’t realtime enough. In a pinch we decided on a service called Flydata. After weeks of effort to get it setup & administered we had it running smoothly.

I since discovered some pipelining solutions dedicated to Redshift such as Alooma – modern data plumbing, RJMetrics pipeline and Domo. I *did not* manage to get Tungsten working. It supports redshift on paper, but has a lot of growing up to do.

Until one data when the data scientist shows up at my desk. “We have problems in our data on redshift.”. I look back confused. “Are you sure? Can you tell me where you’re seeing that?” I respond.

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2. Deleted data reappears in Redshift!

He sends me over some queries, that I rerun myself. I see extra data in Redshift too, data that had been deleted in MySQL. Strange. We dig deeper together trying to figure out what’s happening.

We find that the tables with extra data are child tables of a parent where data was deleted. Imagine Citibank deletes a customer, they also want to delete the records for monthly bills. Otherwise those will just be hanging around, and won’t match up anymore with a parent record for a customer. In real life Citibank probably doesn’t delete like this but it’s a helpful example.

The first thing I do is open a ticket with Flydata. After all we hadn’t gotten any errors logged. Things *must* be running correctly.

After highlighting the severity of the issue, we setup a conference call with Flydata. Digging further they discover the problem. Child table data can’t get deleted on Redshift, because it doesn’t support ON DELETE CASCADE. Wait what?

Turns out Flydata makes use of the MySQL transaction log to move data. In mysql to mysql replication this works fine because downstream you also have MySQL. It also implements on delete cascade so those child records will get cleaned up correctly. Since Redshift doesn’t have this, there’s no way for Flydata to instruct Redshift what to do. Again I said, wait what?

My surprise wasn’t that a new unproven technology like Redshift had a lot of holes & missing features. My surprise was that Flydata was just silently ignoring the problem. No logged messages to tell the customer about inconsistencies. At least?

Related: Is Amazon too big to fail?

3. The problem – comparing data

As you might imagine, this is a terrible way to find out about data problems. As the person tasked with moving data between these systems, eyes were on me. My thought was, we chose a service-based solution, so they’re manage data movement. If there’s a problem, they’ll surely alert us.

From there the conversation became, ok, how do we figure out where all these data differences are? Is it widespread or isolated to a few tables? Can we mitigate it with changed queries? Cleanup on a daily basis? These are some questions that’ll immediately come to mind.

To answer them we needed a way to compare table data across different databases. This is hard to do within a homogenous environment where server versions & datatypes are likely to be the same. It is much more complicated when you’re working across heterogenous systems.

Read: 5 Reasons to move data to amazon redshift

4. Build some way to spot check data

Although this still doesn’t seem a solved problem, there are some tools. One way is to perform checksums on tables & rows. These can then be compared to find differences.

This drew me to find Jason Friedman’s
table hash script on Github. It can work across MySQL, Postgres & redshift. Pretty cool stuff if you ask me.

One problem remains. Databases are always in flux. As such you may find discrepancies based on data that hasn’t been moved yet. Data that’s just changed in the last few minutes.

If you refresh data nightly, you may for example be able to stop a slave to compare data at an instant in time.

Also: Is Redshift outpacing hadoop as the warehouse for startups?

5. The mentality: treat data as a product & monitor

Solving tough problems like these is a work in progress. What it taught me is that:

You should own your data pipeline

This allows you to be vigilant about monitoring, throw errors if data is different, and ultimately treat data as a product. Owning the pipeline will mean you can build monitoring around stages, and automate spot checks on your data.

You won’t get it perfect, but you want to know when it isn’t.

Also: 5 core pieces of the Amazon puzzle to get your project off the ground

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